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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,
I wonder if i put a turbo on a non turbo 3.0 r5 diesel engine would it work properly? i have 65 kw but i am planning to get nearly 150. should i also change fuel system? has anyone tryed to do that? if yes please share your thoughts)) You could also help me by giving an advice in what turbo should i purchase.
 

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Bad idea. Maybe if you had barrels of money and a shop that would bring a tool-freak German to tears and a couple of years to tinker. Turbo 300D's are all over the place and cheap. Get one of those, and tune it properly and enjoy the car. Same way, enjoy your non-turbo 300D. It is faster than the 240's and they are much beloved

When the factory went to turbo 300D's they put their fanatic minds to the problem and made hundreds of changes to the engine to give it reliability and longevity. You think you can do better working under your shade tree? For example the pistons. They were changed to versions that had oil squirters pointed at the bottom of the piston for cooling.

Bottom line: sell off your non turbo and get a turbo 300D and be happy with it

BTDT Marshall in Phoenix
 

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changing pistons wouldnt also help?
Changing pistons is only a small part of the problem. Turboing an engine, any engine, creates a huge amount of heat and stress. The rest of the engine has to be designed to deal with that if you expect it to last any decent amount of time
 

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'73 450SL, '83 300CD, '01 E320 4matic
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1) The non turbo engine is a very long lasting, reliable, and fuel efficient engine that will last, and last, and last, and last......... and last.... I drove two non-turbo 300s over the course of almost 3 years and a combined 75,000 miles or so, all highway driving, all kinds of weather. It IS fast enough. The turbo is very nice, but I would not think twice about buying another without it if the car was in nice shape. Both cars were put to bed because of rust and transmission failures- both engines ran like new. The most recent one's 331K mile engine is running in my friends tractor.

2) Turbo 300D's are all over the place for cheap. You could just swap out the entire engine and it'd be easier and more reliable.

3) Search this forum, there are literally hundreds of threads about this. You have two different engines built in a similar crankcase. Other than both displacing 3.0L with 5 cylinders and sharing a bolt pattern with the transmission, you have two completely different engines.
 

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'83 300D
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What everyone else has said rings true. If you don't think the NA 5-cyl has enough power for our needs, then find a complete turbo engine and related parts and wiring to install in your car. Just bolting on a turbo will cause you more problems than you can imagine.

I think we need a "Can I turbo a NA 300D?" sticky.
 

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1982 300D Turbodiesel 212K or so, it doesn't work anymore :-)
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if you are willing to change pistons why wouldn't you just swap the motor...in my area you can pick up a complete low mileage motor for <$800...

i just don't think you can justify all the extra work and parts you'd have to replace against simply swapping motors.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok thanks guys, than i will stay with my stock engine. But one more question would it be difficult to install engine from w210?
 

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'73 450SL, '83 300CD, '01 E320 4matic
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Ok thanks guys, than i will stay with my stock engine. But one more question would it be difficult to install engine from w210?
You can do anything if you know how- but if you're asking, chances are this isn't the type of project you've gotten into in the past.

Search here and online. Mercedes modifications are nothing new- somewhere along the line just about any MB engine has been installed in a W123, new and old- and a lot of non MB engines too.

Know that on an American rear drive car that the transmission is always mounted in the same spot no matter what engine is installed. ie. a V8 chevy and a V6 chevy will both be lined up at the firewall.

In an MB and in other european cars, this is not the case. The transmission, it's assorted linkages, and the driveshafts will all be different depending on the engine installation.

Easy? not really... Difficult? not really... if you know what you're doing. Any modifications require the know-how, which comes from experience.

Right now, I'm working on putting a 2.0L european market Ford Pinto engine and its mated 4 speed manual into a 1958 Triumph 10. It does not come close to fitting. The firewall was modified to make it fit. We finally got it all set in last weekend, but there's a long way to go before that vehicle moves on it's own. Brakes for example-- The engine and tranny fit, but there's no room for the master cylinder... whoops... You will always run into obstacles doing these projects. Sometimes you have to completely re-engineer a car to get things to work. There's always something you have not thought of- and always something that will send you in the house at 11:00PM, because you need some little thing you can't get at that hour. Even when I swapped the 300SD engine into the 300CD- there were some things that had to be changed, and those are nearly identical engines.
 

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Can someone email me privately with info as to what turbo upgrade options i have on a budget, where to get rebuild kits trustworthy or rings, etc. just purchased my second one and would like up to date assistance or advice. these threads are old and so ongoing i can't find the answers I'm looking for on a first page.

1982 w123 300d. TD
 

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2013 MINI Copper S Clubman, '84 300CD-weekend car
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There is a web site, superturbodiesel or something similar, I would think you may find more answers there.
 
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