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2007 ML CDI, 1967 250SL(early), 1984 280 SL, 2004 E320 wagon, 2015 ML 250, 1999 E300TD
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449 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
After 160K miles my fuel pump gave out and intermittantly malfunctioned.
After a lot of stops and starts the engine would not fire up. It would crank, but not start.
Twice, after about an hour it would restart, so I brought it to my MB dealer.
They diagonsed a faulty fuel pump and changed it out.
But in order to do so they had to remove the rear seat, pump out fuel tank from inside in order to replace the pump.
Labor was more then parts- $1300. bucks total.
Why is the pump inside the tank and not next to it like they used to be ?
 

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His 2013 RAM Cummins Turbo Diesel Laramie; Hers 2007 ML320 CDI P3; Kids 2010 "4Matic" Impreza
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334 Posts
That's the way forward now...
At least it gave 160000 miles.:thumbsup:
 

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04 SL500 / 06 ML 500
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2,004 Posts
Fuel pumps today are much higher capacity plus higher fuel pressure and for a long time manufacturers put them in tank for cooling making for higher longevity but costly and time consuming replacement.
Heat and fuel pumps makes for nervous corporate lawyers. They don't care about repairs as long as it doesn't catch fire.
 

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2006 Mercedes ML 350
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68 Posts
The first car I ran across with an in-tank fuel pump was a 1969 Buick Riviera. We all (here at the dealer) thought that was a bad idea, and said they would not keep doing that. Now look years later every tank has one!! I also remember when the first car that came in to the Buick dealership was priced over $10,000, we all said that people would not pay that much for a car. Times have changed.
 

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2009 ML320 Bluetec, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
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875 Posts
One bone I have to pick with M-B is how poorly designed-for-repair their products are. There is no excuse for a fuel pump to be $1300 difficult to replace.

It is good for a fuel pump to last 160,000 miles but M-B should know a quality car is going to last that long and need several such repairs. New cars have higher value when buyers learn that they can be kept in top shape for a long time. New cars have higher value IF older cars are kept in top condition. A top notch service department can only go so far toward this goal.

At some point owners realize the car has turned into a money pit costing more to repair than its worth. It would be worth more if it didn't cost so much to repair. For an example just look at the used Porsche 928S market.
 

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2006 Mercedes ML 350
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68 Posts
Here at the dealer I work at (Buick GMC) this summer alone we have had a couple of 7 series BMW's and a Mercedes Benz traded in with the complaint that they are not going to pay the price to repair the expensive German cars anymore. Here in the town I live in we have only 1 MB dealer and his labor rates are about $125.00 an hour to work on the MB cars. Most of the Mercedes repair work is done on menu pricing. Last year the defroster went out on my 04 ML and the dealer wanted about $1,000 to replace the actuator for the defrost door. I had bought the part from parts.com for about $100.00 and Aldata said it could be installed without taking the dash out in about two hours time. The dealer would not do the job by aldata time they were charging for dash removal about 8+ hours labor from the menu pricing guide. If they were more dealers they might offer better prices, who knows. As far as a fuel pump goes I hade to put one in a Jeep Grand Cherokee a few years back, and it listed for almost $600.00 and the rear skid plate and hitch had to be removed to get the tank out to change the unit. The price would be almost as much as the Benz repair was. Times have changed and all repairs are too high. I tell customers to buy new or certified preowned or lease a car to keep from the high cost of repair.
 

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2008 ML 350
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45 Posts
{snip}Times have changed and all repairs are too high. I tell customers to buy new or certified preowned or lease a car to keep from the high cost of repair.
I can't help but feel this is by design. Expensive repairs = increased sales on new cars or CPOs. Maybe that had something to do with why they killed the electric car.

I always appreciate and look forward to reading your thoughtful posts, Don.
 

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2007 ML CDI, 1967 250SL(early), 1984 280 SL, 2004 E320 wagon, 2015 ML 250, 1999 E300TD
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449 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the comments.
BTW, the car is still running and driving like a dream.
I had 4 big guys ,plus full luggage on a 600 mile round trip to Vermont and back this past weekend and everyone commented how smooth and fast the car was- all impressed.
I think next will be ball joints and motor mounts and I will be good for another 160K miles.
 

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2007 ML320 CDI
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117 Posts
Mine only lasted 90,000 miles. I did it myself. The pump was $400.00. What a rip. I still have to go to the dealer and get the fuel gauge recalibrated. It hasnt work right since. My 2003 GMC Envoy has 200,000 + miles and the pump is still pumping. I must just be too stupid to realize how great and high tech the MB pump is. (sarcasm)(Duh)
 

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2006 Mercedes ML 350
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68 Posts
The biggest problem with failed parts on the vehicles built today, is most of the parts are built by an outside company. They may be build from the car makers design or specs, but they are still not built in house like they were in the past. Look in a car magazine sometime they will show a car and point out who builds the various parts for the car. Each company has different build standards and sometimes they may find an outside vender (in China) to build a part and put the company name on it and sell it to the car maker. Everything is about saving a dollar at our expense. The auto makers need to go back to building parts in house so the have a better handle of failure rate and quality control.
 

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2009 ML320 Bluetec, 2013 Tesla Model S 85
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875 Posts
The biggest problem with failed parts on the vehicles built today, is most of the parts are built by an outside company.
Thats why we have (and have always had) the term OEM, to describe the Manufacturer of Original Equipment, which is not to be confused with OE, Original Equipment.

A recent example in my case: It appears Bilstein is the OEM for my ML's shock absorbers. The B4 "comfort" shocks appear to be OE. The 4600 series "HD" shocks are still OEM because they are made by Bilstein who makes the OE. The 4600's are OEM but they are not original equipment.

KTM made a name for themselves in the dirtbike world by deliberately using the best independent components rather than have custom just-for-them parts made. Shocks, handlebars, brakes, wheels, controls, etc. Honda seemingly uses a different clutch lever every year on their CRF, and different on the 450 than the 250. But KTM has used practically the same two clutch levers on all models 125-570 the past 12 years. Some have Magura (with mineral oil) others have Brembo (using DOT brake fluid).

The auto makers need to go back to building parts in house so the have a better handle of failure rate and quality control.
They have always farmed out parts. The more complex the car the more parts will be outsourced. No matter the source it is ultimately the automaker's responsibility to control the quality.

What would you have M-B do, buy iron mines and steel plants to produce their own steel as well? In a way I am joking but steel and welding rods for nuclear construction are tracked all the way to their original mines.
 

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2006 Mercedes ML 350
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68 Posts
N4HHE I still stand by my statement. Parts should be made in house by the car makers. I have worked at the same dealership for 40 years, and have replaced more parts than I can remember over the years. The town that I live in had at one time 30,000 workers working in at least 6 production plants building parts for GM cars. No they did not make the raw material for the parts but they did build the shocks, brake shoes, pads, brake hoses, steering wheels, motor mounts, a/c compressors and too many parts to list for GM cars. If we had a part to fail here at the dealer we could call the plant, and someone would come over with a replacement part for the customers car and take the failed part back to the plant to inspect. Yes I would like MB to build its parts and the same with every other car company. All of the GM plants here in town have shut down now. The GM truck plant is also closed. Now when you look at a part on a car it is made in mexico china or some other country. I bought a part from MB the other day and it was made in Mexico as well. So yes a company making its parts will keep workers working with the pride to build a quality part that will last more than a couple of years, and in the long run make people want to be a repeat buyer.
 
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