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1988 U1300L RW1 Working gears Dual Tanks AC Rigged for Camping Plus: 91 F250 HD 4x4
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354 Posts
Spent the past week at an undisclosed location on the Colorado Plateau (Oops, was I supposed to say that?), where I was very privileged to be allowed to observe what is believed to be the first (and highly classified) field-of-rock testing of the highly sophisticated, yet to be publicly unveiled, (or even acknowledged) Mercedes-Benz

Mogtonomous Truck Three Point Ohhhhh.....

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[ might have mis-understood, perhaps the techs said "Autonomogous Vehicle 3.0" ]
Fortunately, this platform vehicle has a backup camera; here is what was behind:

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1966 Unimog 406 Cabrio 406-120-10 095-883
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I spent the day yesterday driving my mog around the airport trying to understand the gears and shifting. Is there a lock out for the forward & reverse lever, that the other levers have to be so you can shift from forward to reverse?
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1976 406
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538 Posts
Which transmission do you have?

BWSwede
 

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1966 Unimog 406 Cabrio 406-120-10 095-883
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The real answer is, I don't know. One of the guys here, after looking at a picture of it said, "... looks like a fully spec'd PTO/cascade/crawler transmission". I am trying to learn about it as much as possible so I would be greatly thankful for any help.
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'78 Mog 416.141 DoKa
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Well, (1) is the main gear shifter...
(2) is the old style diff lock (I think - mine is air powered)
(3) is the cascade
(4) is the reverser
(5) is the range shifter (normal, crawler,super crawler)
(6) don't know that one - it doesn't come up above the shift boot
EDIT: Oh wait - PTO shifter - duh. By the looks of your truck front end, you don't have a PTO


Oh. . . you can only shift into reverse in 1st & 2nd unless you have the full French "retreat option" :cool:
 

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1966 Unimog 406 Cabrio 406-120-10 095-883
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28 Posts
Well, (1) is the main gear shifter...
(2) is the old style diff lock (I think - mine is air powered)
(3) is the cascade
(4) is the reverser
(5) is the range shifter (normal, crawler,super crawler)
(6) don't know that one - it doesn't come up above the shift boot
EDIT: Oh wait - PTO shifter - duh. By the looks of your truck front end, you don't have a PTO


Oh. . . you can only shift into reverse in 1st & 2nd unless you have the full French "retreat option" :cool:
That is SO FREEKIN helpful!!! Thank you very much!!!
 

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... Is there a lock out for the forward & reverse lever, that the other levers have to be so you can shift from forward to reverse?
The exact operation depends on the transmission and shift pattern, but yes reverse can only be engaged in low range. For the 6-speed base pattern (404, some 406) which I think you have, where you engage low range 1st/2nd gear by moving the main gear stick hard to the left and high range 3/4/5/6th gear by a hard movement to the right, reverse can only be engaged in 1st/2nd. This is because the reverse gear is driven off the low range reduction shaft. In high range operation the reduction shaft is bypassed.
 

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1988 U1300L RW1 Working gears Dual Tanks AC Rigged for Camping Plus: 91 F250 HD 4x4
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354 Posts
The pandemic is sure making a mess of a lot of things. Finally decided we needed at least a day trip to the mountains, so Ms Mog and I packed lunch and goodies, and did a reprise of last July's jaunt up near the Continental Divide and the East Portal of the Moffat Tunnel. About 40 minutes to get to Boulder Canyon, then a long slog "up the hill", then life gets more entertaining. As last trip, the Forest Service had the gate still locked, that lets one get out above treeline and very near the Divide and James Peak. We backtracked about 1/2 mile, and took a side track. Stopped for food and views, at 10800 foot elevation.

I trotted up on the rise, and beckoned for company.

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Turning 90 degrees right, this is what I see; James Peak, at the head of Mammoth Gulch. Aiming right at the sun, the polarizing filter doesn't do any good, but still.....

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Turning 180 degrees from that, this is a bit of the road we came up on, with the eastern plains visible in the far distance:

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We hung out for a while, watched two small thunderstorm cells develop as the winds pushed the air masses from the southwest up and over the Divide. A few cracks, a few sprinkles; typical Colorado mountain weather.

Driving back down, we stopped at the open stretch in the previous photo. Looking up to James: we were stopped for lunch in the dip just below treeline, to the left of the peak.

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Back down to the Rollins Pass Road, we continued up, but being late, turned back before the gate at the old rail tunnel and wagon road over the Pass, up on the Divide. Coming back down from there, we stopped to get a photo of the East Portal. The Moffat Tunnel is 6 miles long, and a real cool thing to experience on the Amtrak passenger train. The rail route from Denver to Glenwood Springs (more or less the west side of the range) is supposed to be one of the greatest train rides in the US. 40-some tunnels, the Moffat is the longest by far. I have done this rail trip 3 times; never boring.

The East Portal; facing west at 4 pm, the light contrast was really extreme. That is not rain or haze, just over exposure washing out the image. The West Portal is right at the Winter Park Ski area, over on the west side of the Continental Divide. The original rail route went over Rollins Pass, adding several thousand feet of climbing, and lots of excitement during the winter months.

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And for context:

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The deep valley is Mammoth Gulch. We had been far up on the near side of that valley earlier.

Now, the ostensible purpose of this jaunt was to test out the Dual SkyPro XGPS160 receiver, and the new iPad arrangement in the truck. I won't belabor you with all my miscues and goofs launching and operating the whole shebang, but it would have made a good comic video. Why read and learn before you go, when floundering like a beached whale can be so amusing?

With maps downloaded to the iPad from Gaia.com, one is supposed to be able to know and track one's location anywhere, no cell service or Internet required. Where I like to go on my "real" trips, that is a requirement. The XGPS updates every 0.1 seconds, so fast that the direction of movement arrow will turn on the map as you make a left/ right turn at a road intersection. And it does this anywhere, miles away from any other form of communication. And it did this, on this trip. I am jazzed!

FWIW, here is a screenshot of part of the saved track, from the Gaia app on the iPad:

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Where the track changes color is Nederland CO. Site of a miscue in operating the app (oops!!). The Gaia maps have layers, and rather than their composite topo layer (more civilization oriented), I am displaying on the Trails Illustrated map layer. It is more detailed and more relevant up in the mountains.

Final bit: my Kysor roof top unit is a godsend, although far from perfect. I think it is about 18K BTUH. My gripes are the noise up by our ears, and the fact that cool air must be thrown over your shoulder. If the sun is coming in on the right side, or even right front quarter, the radiant heat on the arm and upper body gets a bit much, but I would sure hate to be without any AC.

The sound absorber panels for the rear windows seem to do a lot for sound quality, and conversation was actually decently doable at engine rpm's below 2200 or so, not quite so good at max 2750. Fan noise is subdued, which is the biggest thing. Back down on the plains, it was 20 miles heading east (firebody shades the cab) to home, and with fan on middle speed, the cab was very comfortable. Got top the shop, and jumped out to open the doors. Nearly fainted in the heat: it was 98 degrees. Gotta love one's mechanical contrivances (like refrigeration).

Lee
 

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1976 406 w/ backhoe and dozer blade, a small collection of implements too
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Well, today it's a the house but yesterday it met up with a friend out in our sand pit.

Actually a bunch of us humans and dogs got together for some swimming and grilling Sunday afternoon. The mogs were not really the main event but they got together and played a bit in the pit and in the woods.
 

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'76 1300L,HE351CW,H15P Winches,Konis,Hydraulics,All Gears,10mm Plungers,Aftercooler,Lots of Littles
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1996 U1350L
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YIKES! :)

C.
Felt fine driving it. Knew it was coming so was ready for a little lift. Opted not to trail build to fill the big hole that the passenger rear tire drove through. Could I have chosen a slightly different line? Perhaps, but again, well within the ability of the truck and really not that far of a lean - I've driven much more angle.

Still need to go see my friend who has a crane shop. We plan to do the angle test like the bodybuilders do in Europe. One crane to prevent tip over + two forklifts (one for each wheel on one side) to see actually how far we can lean this truck over before it starts to tip. The camper has a very low COG, but I'd like to know the point-of-no-return angle number.

I do find that because the GVWR of this truck is 8.5t and the fully loaded setup is only 7.0t, it sometimes doesn't flex as much as it could (with frame twist and all), but then again, I'd rather be light than heavy.
 

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Another day, another rescue mission.
I've been lucky again to be able to demonstrate the mighty abilities of this forum's main topic to the world - Unimog of course.
This time the dump truck with pup got stuck in the snow.
Standard procedure of locking differentials, setting transmission in first gear and using recovery strap turned out to be enough again, to do the job.

View attachment 2477554
How does you u500 handle in the snow?
 
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