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Discussion Starter #1
what engine oil is used in the vito from factory?
mine has done 5000km and needs top up.
to mix different grades is not recommended, so does someone know what sort oif oil is used when they come new from factory?
i read that mobile1 is supposed to be "the best"
is there an other one, - just a little bid better in price?
 

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Mercedes-Benz Engine Oil Recommendations

CASTROL ENDURON LOW SAPS
Castrol Enduron Low Saps is an SAE 10W-40 synthetic technology high performance engine oil designed to allow fleet operators to maximise drain interval in new vehicles . It's primary application is for the latest low emission Euro V and IV European trucks, buses and light commercial vehicles, especially those requiring a low SAPS lubricant. Meets ACEA E4, E6, E7.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
so, they deliver them with 10W-40(?)
thanks for the info

carpy said:
Mercedes-Benz Engine Oil Recommendations

CASTROL ENDURON LOW SAPS
Castrol Enduron Low Saps is an SAE 10W-40 synthetic technology high performance engine oil designed to allow fleet operators to maximise drain interval in new vehicles . It's primary application is for the latest low emission Euro V and IV European trucks, buses and light commercial vehicles, especially those requiring a low SAPS lubricant. Meets ACEA E4, E6, E7.

Hope this helps.
 

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Vito 111CDi 2004
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Do a search... this has been discussed before. I just stick in castrol in mine but change it relgiously every 6k miles.
 

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Lads as far as I know it's not 10W40 as that would be a semi-synthetic according to my limited knowledge.. The 111 cdi uses fully synthetic suitable for cars with particle filters ( 5w30 is the one your looking for I think, aka Mobil One, the silver cans of high end magnatec and so on ). Another indication of having bought the right stuff is price, should be on average about twice as expensive as 10w40
 

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V280 LPG 2000
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I'm probably talking rubbish here but I thought...

Engines need thicker oil when running in so what they come out the factory with and what is recommended after they have done so many miles is different.

Mobil 1 is now 0w40, but used to be 5w40.

I'm sure someone will be along to correct me shortly. :D
 

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Vito 114 tourer 2015: Vito 108d 97: 108d 98: Traveliner 2003 ; Aixam; z1100; xbr500; z440 ++++
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dangerous misconceptions arise - methinks.

too much "knowledge" comes from when cars were very new and misunderstood.

Oil is Best when it easily flows around the engine AND provides maximum distance between moving parts (called lubrication).

When an engine is cold ..... oil is at its thickest ....... and it flows less easily.

When an engine is hot ...... oil is at its thinnest ....... and gives least lubrication.

therefore you need an oil that is thin when cold AND most lubrication when hot.

Hence the numbering (sae) system
..... first number is at its cold point ... and should be as low as possible.
..... second number is at its hot point .... and should be as high as possible.

using oil of significantly greater spec than the vehicle demands is a waste of money.

most modern vehicles (turbos etc) like oil with the widest sae points ... like 0/50
slightly older vehicles (say pre turbo vitos) prefer a slightly narrower range of 10/50 (or 10/40)

Synthetics are generally better than mineral (standard) oils and are desirable if using vegetable oil or biodiesels (they don't soap as much)

It is most important to use the best oil you can when running in - mobil one is excellent (but more than I can afford on me disabled pension).

Always use a flushing oil (an additive type is great .. and easier) when oil changing (garages won't normally .. so add one yourself a couple of hours before going for service and have a good run)

Advantages of wide range (and synthetics) ... better lubrication, more protection when hot, easier starting when cold, more protection when cold, engine should last longer.

Disadvantages .... slightly noisier engine (thick oil muffles sounds), more expensive, you can expect to use more oil as it leaks past the piston rings and seals easier.

Another "old knowledge" is "always warm a diesel engine up before moving off" --- complete crap and was originally (in mr fords handbook) "always fully warm up an engine before starting" or "turn the injector heaters on and allow to warm up properly before hitting starter button, then drive away gently until at full operating temperature" ... slight difference over the years but the original is easy to understand, whereas the garbled modern version produces lots of wear and smoke, burns fuel for no reason and pollutes everybody.
 

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Malcolm raises some good points, i disagree with a couple though.
"It is most important to use the best oil you can when running in" Our engines get a 4 minute run-in using a horrible looking (& smelling!) oil which gets reused on the next engines coming down the line.
The oil is pre-heated, as is the engine coolant, to allow the quick run-in. Once the engine has been run-in the oil is flushed & the engine treated to some good quality oil. The engines don't use good quality oil (synthetic) for the run-in as the engine doesn't break-in properly leading to excessive blowby & oil consumption.
The other points "Another "old knowledge" is "always warm a diesel engine up before moving off" & "then drive away gently until at full operating temperature" both true i'm afraid although not always practical. Most vans get ragged right from the off, so common rail engines have fuel & rail pressure maps which are limited by coolant temp. Only when the coolant temp goes over 78°C do you recieve the full power fuel & rail pressure maps. So you are limited until the engine is at full operating temperature.

Ugly
 

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Vito 113, X-Trail
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Mercedes-Benz to my knowledge use a reconditioned oil in vehicles coming off the line. This is engine oil that has been in a sense 'recycled'.

(The base oil which is obtained from a number of sources, is micro-filtered, and a 'package' is added that contains detergents, anti foaming agents, lubrication additives (solid and soluble) etc. It is then labelled as Mercedes-Benz item 000.000.something and used as so-called 'factory-fill.")

Given that the base stock from this 'factory-fill" is probably derived from different sources, it is unlikely to be a fully synthetic ester, rather semi-synthetic or even mineral-based.

So, if your Vito is still running on its factory-filled oil and you need to replenish it, you could simply use a mineral oil of the same viscosity as stated in the owner's book, since replenishing the factory-filled oil with synthetic is a waste of good money.

I would save the synthetic for subsequent oil changes. In which case, for the Mercedes diesels I would use Mobil One Delvac - if its available, and make sure to use a good quality oil filter that is changed twice as often as the oil itself.
 

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Vito 114 tourer 2015: Vito 108d 97: 108d 98: Traveliner 2003 ; Aixam; z1100; xbr500; z440 ++++
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I agree with you.... I also run in a new or rebuilt engine with old preheated oil, as it works well and gets the engine moving quickly.

BUT (sorry to shout) when most people talk of running in, what they mean is - driving for the first 500 / 1000 / 5000 etc miles as called by the manufacturer "running in" and I stand by " good oil is best".

I think my "old knowledge" bit has been misunderstood ..... I was being sarcastic to a point........

people think that the "old knowledge" is "fully warm a diesel before moving off" whereas the original information was in fact (if applied to a modern diesel like a vito) turn key until ignition lights come on, wait for the heater plugs to warm up (the heater plug light goes out) THEN start the engine and drive off gently (don't race the engine)..... in other words DON'T sit and warm the engine for 10minutes before driving off.

The point is...... I hate people who sit and warm an engine first (provided you can see out of the windows) as it pollutes the air and wastes fuel .... more over .... it actually does not help the engine, since steady revs (at any speed) can cause damage ........ ALL manufacturers recommend varying engine revs at all times, something we all do naturally whilst driving.
 
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