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All RHD: 82 280GE LWB UK | 12 SLK200 | 08 B170 | //sold:14 B250|06 B170|11 B180
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Singapore Army released a batch of 1995 29GD/34 (209GD) vehicles with a cab and long deck, what is called a ute in NZ. See 1995 Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon Model 29GD/34 - Price Estimate: $32000 - $40000 for a listing. They advertised it as having a 4,200 tare weight.

Wikipedia says tare sometimes called unladen weight, is the weight of an empty vehicle or container. That's 9,260 pounds, getting into Unimog territory, and the photos sure don't look like anything that butch.

In NZ, 4,200 kg tare means the vehicle is subject to a much more expensive semi-annual COF inspection, because it is over 3,500 KG tare. The advert specifically says "Please note this vehicle was previously listed as being a WoF, it is not eligble for WoF but requires a CoF due to its weight."

But my 1982 280GE LWB is said to have a 2065 kg curb weight and a 2800 kg gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR), and a payload of 735 kg. If tare weight means unladen with 10 litres of fuel, then my G has a tare weight of 2020 kg, less than half the 4,200kg Singapore 29GD/34. My 280GE LWB has a full steel body and steel roof. The 29-GD-34 has a flat bed and a fabric roof.

But more to the point, if it is accurate how is it designed to carry empty 4,200 KG, when my GVWR is 2,800 kg. Would that be by using a different spring and tyre combination? Can I upgrade my 280GE to a tare of 3,500kg? Or is this just an error?

1995 Mercedes-Benz G-Class - G-Wagon 29GD/34

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Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Locking hubs


Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Land vehicle Vehicle
 

· Registered
All RHD: 82 280GE LWB UK | 12 SLK200 | 08 B170 | //sold:14 B250|06 B170|11 B180
Joined
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176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't own one.

They were sold at auction in New Zealand, which has a semi-annual inspection for vehicles made before 2000.

However, the NZ warrant of fitness (WOF) inspection for 3,500 kg and under is $50 while the certificate of fitness (COF) is much more extreme and can cost $300. The auctioneer specifically mentioned the 29GD/34 required a COF, and had a tare of 4,200kg.

What piqued my interest was the much higher carrying capacity. However, unless someone on the forum can enlighten me, I tend to think the auction house just got it wrong. If it truly means tare, then a trip to the weigh station should reveal the truth.
 
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