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Discussion Starter #1
I have recently begun a long overdue maintenance program on my 1994 S420. I have found that some of the very expensive wood panels particularly around the front seat adjuster are lifting from the aluminum. Before I just JB Weld them back on I was wondering if there are any thoughts on a better adhesive to use. Thanks
 

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You might look into some contact cement !! There are a few things that I have used Gorrilla Glues super glue ! good stuff!

Smokie
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks much for the advice. Will probably go with Gorilla glue because the superglue works best on a non porous surface and I can't tell what's on the back of the wood and I don't want to lift it and risk breaking it. I can't afford to remortgage the house . ;-)
 

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Super glue is perfect for that job
 

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The proper technique is to use contact cement. Let it dry and then clamp the veneer firmly to the aluminium for a few hours.
 

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The proper technique is to use contact cement. Let it dry and then clamp the veneer firmly to the aluminium for a few hours.
The impact glue can dry out if the car gets very hot inside, the industrial cayanoacrylate glues are what MB supplied with walnut trims
 

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If MB used the stuff, then OK, but still clamp it to make sure it's flat.

Good, high solids, contact cement lasts forever. I do veneering as a hobby.
 

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Gorilla Glue EXPANDS as it cures

I have recently begun a long overdue maintenance program on my 1994 S420. I have found that some of the very expensive wood panels particularly around the front seat adjuster are lifting from the aluminum. Before I just JB Weld them back on I was wondering if there are any thoughts on a better adhesive to use. Thanks
You don't want Gorilla Glue in this application. It expands 3x to 4x as it cures which sounds good, but not in a laminated environment.

While contact cement is commonly used to apply melamine laminate to a substrate (counter tops) and apply veneers to wood backing (furniture), the best choice is the super glue material for long term stability.

The one advantage of contact cement is flexibility as temps fluctuate and wood/aluminum expand/contract at different rates. It tends to degrade in high heat environments common to summer intereriors.

Go with a very THIN layer of adhesive and CLAMP firmly.
 

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If MB used the stuff, then OK, but still clamp it to make sure it's flat.

Good, high solids, contact cement lasts forever. I do veneering as a hobby.
Fair enough you do know what you are talking about, I did some veneering on my 1928 RR it took 3 goes to get it right, with burr walnut impact glues cannot be used. I had to make up pressure bladders from car tyre inner tubes and blow them up so the the veneer went down in the curved sections.

Wonderful working with wood, so nice and clean
 

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Curved surfaces are hard to do, compound curves particularly so. The old fashioned way is to apply pressure with a thing that looks like a scraper. Takes forever and needs real skill. My efforts have been less than successful.

Using a high density PVA glue on these makes it easier to get right but it takes a long time to dry so clamping is even more essential. A vacuum press is best but I've not been able to justify the cost for a pro one. They are simple enough to make for small items though, really just a vacuum pump and some plastic bags. Got the pump, just waiting on another project to try it out.
 

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Curved surfaces are hard to do, compound curves particularly so. The old fashioned way is to apply pressure with a thing that looks like a scraper. Takes forever and needs real skill. My efforts have been less than successful.

Using a high density PVA glue on these makes it easier to get right but it takes a long time to dry so clamping is even more essential. A vacuum press is best but I've not been able to justify the cost for a pro one. They are simple enough to make for small items though, really just a vacuum pump and some plastic bags. Got the pump, just waiting on another project to try it out.


My younger brother just bought a vacuum set, it was not expensive very useful, he is a chippy. cannot remember who made it
 
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