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+ 40c ???????????????????????????????????
 

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2005 S600
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Unless you're driving in sub-freezing temperatures, like -30°C (-22°F) don't worry too much about the difference between 0W40, 5W40, 10W40, 15W40, etc., As it's all 40 weight oil and good for temperatures up to +40°C (104°F)
The "W" stands for Winter...not weight, and goes with the left number: 0W, 5W, 10W, etc.
So like the others said: as long as it meets the MB specifications.
....
For those curious, here's the difference the Winter number means:
0W = -40°C
5W = -35°C
10W = -30°C
15W = -25°C
It's simply a 5°C increment in temperature capabilities. That's it.
While everything George said is true...keep in mind that those are the LOWEST temperatures at which the oil will flow.

But "flow" like molasses... A lower 1st number (the "winter" number) will flow much, much better on start-up at more normal temperatures.

At operating temperatures, 100C, Mobil 0W40 is 12.9 CsT (viscosity).
At 40C (really hot day, or during warm up), the M1 is 71 CsT. Five times thicker.
At -40C (really cold day), the oil is 21,000 CsT.

Over 1,000 times more viscous It's molasses! It barely moves!

So, yeah, while you can use those oils down to the temperatures listed, and all xxW40 oils fall within the 12-16 CsT range at 100C, even at 20C (regular day), the 0W40 will flow quicker on start-up than the 10W40, or 15W40.

So, I use either 0W40, or 5W40 year 'round. It gets to the turbos a couple of seconds sooner on a regular day than an oil with a higher winter number.

Further, a 0W30 is a good choice for this car. xxW30 falls between 9 and 12 CsT. Castrol 0w30 is right at 11 CsT. The difference between that and the 12.9 CsT of the M1 is quite minor. Both are good, and both are on the Bevo list of Mercedes-approved for 229.5

And finally, ANY oil must meet the MB 229.5 specification.

Viscosity is one parameter, and important, but the specification is critical. Oil is 20-25% additives. Those additives are what distinguish oil in specification, for important things like drain interval/life. The right base stock with the wrong additive package is the wrong oil just as the right size tire in the wrong speed rating is the wrong tire.


 

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2005 S600
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+ 40c ???????????????????????????????????
In Scotland, that number is never seen, but in parts of the US, we call that temperature "Spring" before the real heat of summer shows up...
 

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2006 S500 (W220, Designo Espresso, AMG Sport, LWB)
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+ 40c ???????????????????????????????????
Eh? A little too warm for ye o'er there in Scotland? That's a typical day here in Texas during the summer! (Blah...Yuk... double Yuk!!)

For the OP and future readers:


Keep in mind, AFTER the engine has fully warned up, the outside temperature is irrelevant and you NEED to have the correct weight oil, per manufacture specifications. Ultimately this is to match the tolerances between the engine parts.
The M113 engine was not built with extremely tight tolerances between the various parts. Thus requiring the thicker than average 40 weight oil.
An example engine built with very tight tolerances would be Subaru's EJ257 (4 cyl, 2.5L, Turbo)
 

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Regardless of the MB approval, I read that you shouldn't use -30 oil on the V12TT because the high temperature shear strength isn't high enough. I can't remember the source, but it was authoritative and it stuck in my mind. All our other cars use 0W-30, but it's 10W-40 on the Merc.

Nick
 

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2007 E220CDI, 1990 300E-24V, 1987 W124 3.6 AMG build 1993 E500 W124, 94 320CE, 1997 W140 S280
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I had bought a 2000 s430 about a year back as a project car needing tidying. The seller had included new synthetic engine oil and a full suite of Mahle Filters in the deal so I went ahead and installed it all when I got the car home.

It had a couple of lifters making noise after the oil change which I had not noticed before. So I looked at the oil spec and it was fully synthetic 0w-30 the PO had supplied. Not my flavour if I
was buying it in the first instance.

So I drained (Or should I say extracted it - BEST tool I ever bought FWIW) and put in what I use on all my m104s, m119s, m113s & the m275 - Shell Helix Ultra 5w-40 fully synthetic. Immediate improvement and the lifter noise disappeared again.
 

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In the US, nearly all 10W40 sold is mineral and NONE of it meets MB 229.5, making it a terrible choice for our cars.

HTHS above 3.2 would be good. HTHS of 3.5 or greater would be excellent.

Mobil 1 0W40 has an HTHS of 3.6.
 

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In the US, nearly all 10W40 sold is mineral and NONE of it meets MB 229.5, making it a terrible choice for our cars.

HTHS above 3.2 would be good. HTHS of 3.5 or greater would be excellent.

Mobil 1 0W40 has an HTHS of 3.6.
Shell Helix Ultra has HTHS of 3.68 :p
 

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The Shell Helix, by the way, is Shell’s top of the line and an excellent choice.

On this side of the pond, it’s sold as Pennzoil Ultra Platinum. It’s made in a gas-to-liquid synthetic process and is both rare and expensive.

It’s also the factory fill for Ferrari.

I’ve used the Ultra 5w40 in our Volvo- and the oil analysis of its performance in service was excellent.
It’s a great choice.
 

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S500 4Matic 2005
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Discussion Starter #50
The Shell Helix, by the way, is Shell’s top of the line and an excellent choice.

On this side of the pond, it’s sold as Pennzoil Ultra Platinum. It’s made in a gas-to-liquid synthetic process and is both rare and expensive.

It’s also the factory fill for Ferrari.

I’ve used the Ultra 5w40 in our Volvo- and the oil analysis of its performance in service was excellent.
It’s a great choice.
Astro,

Do you know what the HTHS is on the Liqui Moly?? Thanks.
 

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One would have to live above Arctic Circle to worry about difference between 0W-40 and 5W-40. Both would be, more than, good enough for most of us.

I use High Performance Mobil1 5W-50 in all my cars, which is not easy to find locally but, if I needed to... mixing it with 0W-40 or 5W-40 would not be a problem.
 

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Actually, the Great Lakes era (Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ontario, etc.) will hit -40 (yep, minus 40) Celsius. My Dad was from Detroit and would at times see such winter extremes. Therefore, in those climes, 0W-40 is probably best.

As @Astro14 and @4DGeorge point out, it depends on your local climate which one you need to use. Heavier W (Winter) weights will work in hotter (e. g. the Southwest United States or Northern Mexico) climates.
 

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Actually, the Great Lakes era (Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ontario, etc.) will hit -40 (yep, minus 40) Celsius. My Dad was from Detroit and would at times see such winter extremes. Therefore, in those climes, 0W-40 is probably best.

As @Astro14 and @4DGeorge point out, it depends on your local climate which one you need to use. Heavier W (Winter) weights will work in hotter (e. g. the Southwest United States or Northern Mexico) climates.
I agree. But Great Lakes in the winter… that's inside arctic circle AFAIC. :) I had the "pleasure" to experience -40° there… and couple of times in Colorado. Brrrrrrrr… you spit and it hits the ground frozen.

I've been in California too long… "freezing" usually means little too cold for short sleeves. ;)
 

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Exactly, gents. So, certain parts of the USA are basically like the Arctic, and thus 0W-40 is a good idea in such climes.
 
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