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1981 300 SD, 1991 Geo Metro 4-door Automatic
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487 Posts
If it lives up to their claims...

...it would have been great in my old Mazda RX2...it succumbed to a loss of coolant one day...overheated...the aluminum rotor housings expanded more than the steel bolts holding them together...when the engine cooled, I had a coolant leak and the car, while still running great, ate coolant.
 

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1986 560SL
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43 Posts
I have not tried it, but after the video and checking out their spec sheets I am going to stock some of the powersports mix. I think I can sell it to some of the guys on metric bikes who are still crazy enough to be riding in the 105 temps we are having here in Arkansas. Then I may put it in the 560 this winter when I take her apart for TC guides.
 

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'95 993 / 2011 F150 Raptor SC / Land Cruiser D4D V8 / 500 SEC
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439 Posts
I need some new coolant for the SEC, but first you need to 'prep' for it ith the water remover (75$ over here) and then 2 gallons of 100$ a gallon coolant. Cost for the whole thing : 275 USD. If I replace the water/glycol every 2 years 275$ is going to last me a LOOOOONG time.

That said, if it's as good as they say it is, it's probably worth it.

But I'd have to see some real life heat transfer numbers first.

Incidentally, the 'fan having to run less because of the higher temperature stability' is NOT going to happen all by itself. I suppose you could have a custom thermostat made that opens at -say- 90C AND convert to an electric fan with a switch in the cooling system to run your engine at a higher temp, but a soon as the engine reaches that temp, it's going to switch on and of on just as often as with regular coolant. Only on at 90C and off at 'say- 80 instead of on at 80 and off at 70. Providing the heat transfer of the Evans stuff is around the same as water.

It WOULD help if you cook your engine I guess...

Now, I checked the MSDS on the NPG stuff, and it STILL lists Ethylene Glycol (66-70%), Propylene Glycol (unspecified), WATER (unspecified) and 'Propriety Corrosion Package' <2% (Oooohhh !). So don't drink it or you'll die.

What I am afraid of, however, is they use some form of sodium (that's salt to you guys) to raise the boiling point. Which would NOT be good in an alloy engine. Depending.

I think Amsoil sells a product that's almost completely propylene glycol, so that would qualify as 'waterless' too.

Come to think of it...with that high a boiling point ... at what temp does it freeze solid ?

So at this time, I wouldn't say it's 'snake oil', but it's no magical and revolutionary iCoolant.
 
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