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SEC 600 V12 2dr COUPE (RHD) One of the chosen few.
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2,233 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
RE: Knowlege base

Hmm.. not been keeping an eye on this.. but I think it seems to be drifting away from the reason i set it in motion..

Though it would be good for those of us who can show those of us who might want to..

The info was to be posted here.. for us all to use..without recourse to other website info..

still ***
 

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Premium Member
1997 S600 (sold)
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4,660 Posts
1997 S600 front main seal replacement

1997 S600 Front main seal replacement

This write up describes front main seal replacement on a 1997 S600 sedan. I have no experience with other model years. Things may be different on your car. This is not necessarily a difficult job, but it is a little technically involved and a lot time consuming, especially if you’re like me and you’ve never done it before. The job is made much easier with the right tools and a lift. I have a low-rise lift in my garage, and it got a work-out during this repair as there are a couple of things to do from underneath. DO NOT WORK UNDER YOUR CAR WITHOUT PROPER SUPPORT. BARE MINIMUM, USE SUITABLY RATED JACK STANDS OR RAMPS.

Special tools for the job that you may not have in your tool box:

Mercedes tool #602 589 00 40 00: This is a tool that holds the ring gear to keep the engine from turning while you loosen and tighten the bolt holding the crankshaft pulley to the crankshaft. My dealership quoted me $334 for it. Don’t even think about buying it. You can get away without it.

Mercedes tool #119 589 01 14 00: This is the seal insertion tool. My dealership quoted me $140. I did not buy it opting instead for the shade tree mechanic’s method of tapping the seal in with various tools. I describe my method below.

27mm 3/4in drive deep well socket (1 1/16in is the same size)
3/4in drive breaker bar (with a pipe cheater)
3/4in drive torque wrench . You need 300 ft-lbs (400 NM). This is a big wrench.

1. Remove the fan shroud and fan. Follow Pete’s directions here: http://www.v12uberalles.com/fan_clutch.htm. Because I was also planning to do a coolant flush, I gave myself more room by draining the radiator and removing it. The extra room is not necessary if you’ve got the MB tool for main seal insertion. I didn’t want to buy it. I used a rubber mallet and hammer to insert the seal so I pretty much needed the extra clearance that removing the radiator provided in order to work the mallet and hammer. It’s easy to remove the radiator once you have the fan shroud and fan out. Drain the radiator by opening the stopcock on the lower left of the radiator. Disconnect the transmission cooler lines on the right side of the radiator. These are the hard-line banjo fittings. Place a drain pan underneath and unbolt them. About 100 mL of transmission fluid will spill out and make a mess. I don’t see that this can be avoided, but it is a good idea to remember to replace the lost fluid when the job is done. Disconnect all coolant hoses, remove two nuts and bolts that hold the radiator to the AC condenser, and simply lift the radiator out of the car I plugged all openings in the radiator to prevent dust and dirt from entering.

2. Remove the belt and clean the engine. Take a picture or draw one of the proper belt path. Slacken the tensioner with a 15 mm wrench on the bolt in the middle of the pulley, and remove the belt. The pics below are before and after cleaning pics. I used Gunk Engine Brite. It had been leaking slowly for a while, but the Gunk worked wonders. I was impressed. I’ve also removed the tensioner pulley (one bolt in the center of it) and power steering/hydraulic suspension pump pulley (3 bolts in the face of it) as noted in the pic. This gives more room and a better view of the crankshaft pulley.




3. Rotate the engine to top-dead-center (or close to it). To do this, put a 27 mm socket on the crankshaft pulley and rotate the engine clockwise when you’re facing the engine from the front until you see the 0T mark on the crankshaft pulley. Line this mark up with the point cast into the engine block as shown in the pic (or just get it close). Actually, this could be TDC or 180 degrees past TDC, but it’s not important for this job. The reason for doing this is to ensure that the Woodruff key that links the crankshaft pulley to the crankshaft is on top of the crankshaft. Otherwise, the key may fall off the crankshaft and inside the engine into the oil pan. See below for pics of the key. If the key falls into the oil pan, you have no choice but to remove the oil pan to retrieve it. When I removed my pulley, I found the Woodruff key was stuck to the crankshaft. I couldn’t remove it with mild pressure from a right angle pick, so I just left it in place and figured I had nothing to worry about losing it. WARNING: Do not rotate the engine counterclockwise. Always turn in the normal running direction of the engine.



4. Prevent the engine from turning counterclockwise while you loosen the crankshaft pulley bolt. The factory tool mentioned above prevents the ring gear from turning. We’ll do the same thing much more cheaply using a Mercedes mechanic‘s trick taught to me by my father-in-law. He owned a MB repair shop for a while in the past. First, remove the ring gear access hole cover on the transmission shown in the pic. Wedge something in between the ring gear and the transmission housing so that the ring gear won’t turn counterclockwise (as you’re looking at the engine from the front of the car). I used a 3in long piece of 1/2in square solid steel bar. See pic for how the bar is put in place. NOTE IN THIS PIC THAT THE BAR IS PLACED TO PREVENT THE RING GEAR FROM TURNING CLOCKWISE. FOR THIS STEP, THE BAR SHOULD BE ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RING GEAR.




5. Remove the crankshaft pulley bolt. This is where you need a big wrench. The factory torque spec on the crankshaft pulley bolt is 300 ft-lbs. Hopefully, the steel bar placed to stop the ring gear holds. When the bolt is out, keep the four washers on the bolt as they are. They are concave and should stay in that orientation with the concave side facing the engine. The bolt should be a little damp with oil. It is oiled when it is installed because of the high torque it receives. When I was replacing the pulley and torquing down the pulley bolt to 300 ft-lbs, the bar didn’t hold the ring gear as placed in the above pic. It got gouged by the ring gear teeth and slipped out. I had to resort to a long bar inserted through the torque converter bolt access hole and through the ring gear. In this position, it catches a spoke of the ring gear and stops it from turning. This is clear in the pics below in the steps on reinstalling the pulley.

6. Remove crankshaft pulley. Be careful not to damage the rubber outer circumference too much. I used a pickle fork and hammer from underneath, alternately driving the fork between the pulley and engine on either side of the shaft until the pulley began to come off. I then worked the pulley off the crankshaft by hand from the top. You may be able to work a crow bar from the bottom, too. Be careful of the Woodruff key as you remove the pulley. Don’t knock the key into the engine. Like I said, my key was stuck to the crankshaft so I didn’t have to worry about it. If your key is loose, carefully remove it.





7. Clean around the main seal, and remove the old seal. Plug the opening with something (I used lint free wipes.), and use a wire brush to clean around the old main seal. You don’t want junk entering the engine. Cover a screwdriver with a towel and pry out the old seal.




8. Inspect crankshaft pulley for wear. There will be a polished ring where the old seal contacted the pulley. This is normal. If there is an obvious groove or other wear marks, that is not good. Take a close look. Normally, the seal is installed flush with the engine (see pics above), but Alldata and the MB W140 CD both say to install the seal 3 mm inboard of flush with the engine if there is wear on the pulley. This puts the contact area of the seal on the crankshaft pulley 3 mm inboard of the old patch. This part of the pulley will be clean and fresh since it has been inside the engine the whole time. The factory seal installation tool is designed to handle either installation by simply using the other side of the tool to insert the seal. I guess you get two chances to use your crankshaft pulley, then you have to buy a new one. My pulley had an odd rough spot, about 1 mm X 2 mm right in the polished contact patch, so I opted to do the recessed “repair� installation.



9. Install new seal. While hunting around the local hardware store, I found some big nylon washers that happened to be exactly 3 mm thick and about the size of the main seal. I bought one and trimmed it down in diameter so it was just smaller than the seal. See pic. This will be the final depth-setting insertion tool.



My father-in-law then gave me a piece of PVC piping that was almost the exact diameter of the seal, too. I used this to start the seal and get it flush with the engine. You just need something cylindrical and sturdy and about the same size as the seal. As the pic shows, put the seal in place by hand, place your “insertion tool� flush with the seal, and use a mallet or hammer to tap the seal into the engine. Work your way around slowly a couple of taps at a time, trying to keep the seal fairly even all the way around. Note: I taped a large piece of cardboard to the AC condenser to protect it. The condenser is exposed when you remove the radiator, and I didn’t want to risk damage to it. Work until the seal is flush with the engine. If you’re doing a normal install, you’re done. If you’re installing the seal 3mm recessed, time to get out your 3mm thick final insertion tool.



I put my nylon washer over the seal and slowly tapped it with a hammer, working around its circumference. Once the seal was recessed partially, I took a short piece of 1/2in square steel bar, placed it across the seal and washer, bridging the seal opening as shown in the pic, and tapped the bar to finish seal installation. Again, I worked the bar slowly around the seal trying to keep it going in straight, tapping twice at each stop. I tapped until the bar contacted the face of the engine all the way around the circumference of the seal. This should ensure a uniform 3mm depth all the way around.




10. Install crankshaft pulley. First, oil the inner lip of the seal. I used a Q-tip dipped in clean motor oil. Install the Woodruff key onto the crankshaft. (Mine never came off, which made life easier). Align the notch in the crankshaft pulley with the Woodruff key, and manually slide the pulley on the crankshaft until it hits the seal. Don’t force it in. You’ll use the pulley bolt to finish sliding the pulley through the seal and onto the crankshaft. Again, do not knock the Woodruff key into the engine!



You should oil the pulley bolt again with a little motor oil. Not a lot, just a little.



Start the bolt by hand until it stops against the pulley. Use your 27mm socket and breaker bar (or large ratchet) and start turning the bolt to push the pulley onto the crankshaft, until the pulley is all the way on. For final torquing, you will again have to block the ring gear in some way. As I said above, the square bar wedged between the ring gear and transmission housing didn’t work this time. The bar kept slipping out. So I found that I could insert a longer bar through the torque converter bolt access hole and all the way through the ring gear as in the pic below. (The Q-tip is there just as a soft wedge to hold the bar in place as I turned the engine from the pulley bolt until the spoke in the ring gear caught on the bar. I didn‘t have a buddy helping out who could hold the bar in place.)



11. Final torquing. This should be done in a couple of stages. Put the big torque wrench on the pulley bolt and torque to 200 ft-lbs. Wait 30 min, and then torque to 300 ft-lbs.



12. That’s it. Reinstall everything as you took it off. I hope you took good notes and pictures to help you get it all back together. If you removed the radiator, don’t forget to replace the lost transmission fluid. You just add it through the dipstick.

I’ll have to wait and see if my first main seal replacement was a success. Hopefully there will be no more leaking from the new seal. If it leaks, I will probably buy a new crankshaft pulley. I didn’t want to do this because it costs either $700 or $900 from the dealership (depending on my VIN). I didn’t go back and give my VIN to get a final price. I will also probably buy the factory seal insertion tool just to make sure the seal gets in place nice and straight. My father-in-law said I didn’t need it, but he’s an experienced mechanic and knows what he’s doing.

Brett
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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4,660 Posts
Addendum: Severe leaking from the pump head.

g. Severe air leaks from loose bolts at the pump head.

A poster (SEXYREX) recently related his experiences with fixing a major leak inside his pump. Every time he reset the pump by pulling the fuse, he would get two operations then nothing from each line. Even firmly blocking an output line with a finger, did not cause the build up of enough pressure to trip the shut-off switch. Clearly, there was a major leak central to the pump since every line was affected equally, or there was a problem with the pressure shut-off switch causing timing out. After some inspection, he noticed dust patterns indicating air escaping from the seam in the pump head. It turned out that the screws holding the pump head together were loose. A quick tightening of the screws completely restored function. Now, when firmly blocking an outlet nozzle, the pressure shut-off switch turns the pump off immediately as it should. After adjusting the shut-off pressure, all doors operate normally, and the pump turns off about 3 seconds after latching.
 

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93 BENZ 400 SEL
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425 Posts
RE: Knowlege base

Thx for that Brett,
I just came from my MB mechanic and asked him to do that for me and he said he would like a picture of the pump, cause he does not understand exactly what I mean.

I do not know if it is possible to highlight the part of the pump that needs tightening. He says accessing it isnt difficult.I am also posting something about the brakes that he did today in an appropriate forum.
Thx again
PGP
 

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1997 S600 (sold)
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4,660 Posts
1997 S600 water pump and thermostat replacement

1997 S600 water pump and thermostat replacement

My water pump locked up on me while driving home a couple weeks ago. Fortunately, I was less than a mile from home and could make it the rest of the way before overheating set in. I was particularly bummed since I had just had the radiator out to replace the front main seal a couple months ago. Now, it’s all going to have to come apart again. At least this time, it took only 45 min. or so to remove the radiator to get started on the water pump. I was informed that one could do the pump replacement w/o removing the radiator, but I decided I wanted to have the extra room to work, so I removed it. I decided also to replace the thermostat and to replace all the O-ring seals (5) associated with coolant circulation at the front of the engine. My car is a 1997 model S600 sedan. Other model years may be different.

My pump’s failure mode. Here are pics of the locked up pump. It turns out the outer bearing had rusted out allowing the shaft to wobble off center. When this happened, the impeller contacted the pump housing internally causing the pump to lock. The inner seals were OK so no coolant ever leaked out. My car spent its earlier life in New Hampshire. After several New England winters and 115,000 miles, I guess it is about time for this to happen. I assume the water pump is original to the car.



1. Drain the coolant. If you’re going to reuse it, drain into clean containers. Put a tube (12 mm ID, I think) on the stopcock outlet at the bottom left of the radiator. The small pop out panel in the bumper on the left side allows easy operation of the stopcock with a screwdriver without having to crawl underneath. Pop out the panel and open the stopcock to drain the radiator and reservoir. Have enough containers ready. About 2.5 gallons of coolant will drain out.

2. Remove the fan and fan clutch and then remove the radiator and hoses. Follow Pete’s directions here to remove the fan clutch: http://v12uberalles.com/fan_clutch.htm . Removing the radiator now involves just disconnecting all hose connections to the radiator (water hoses and transmission cooler lines) and lifting the radiator out of the car. When disconnecting the transmission cooler line banjo fittings on the right side of the radiator, a small amount of transmission fluid will spill out and make a mess. You can’t avoid this as far as I can tell. You’ll also have to move the intake cone for the left-side air box out of the way of a plastic tab on the radiator in order to lift the radiator out. Either pull the cone forward or just take the air box out of the car.

3. Protect the AC condenser from damage. Cut a piece of cardboard big enough to cover the AC condenser and tape it in place. You don’t want to have to buy a new condenser. I dodged a bullet this time. I initially forgot to protect the condenser, and as I was removing the stuck fan pulley, the pulley released suddenly and struck the condenser causing a significant dent but no leak fortunately.

4. If the poly-rib belt is still in place, loosen the bolts of the fan pulley and the water pump pulley with the belt holding the pulleys. Then remove the belt and the pulleys. To remove the belt, put a 15 mm socket with a breaker bar on the bolt in the center of the tensioner pulley, turn the tensioner clockwise to release tension, and work the belt off. The pulley mounting shafts are probably rusted making pulley removal a bit difficult. My pulleys released from the backings OK, but sliding them off was difficult. A little WD-40 worked well.

If your belt is no longer in place, use a screwdriver wedged between the bolt heads and the fan pulley flange or the pulley shaft to hold the pulley while you loosen bolts as shown in the pic below. Note that this pic was taken on reassembly, which explains why everything is so clean. The bolts should be torqued to only 10 Nm.



5. Remove the small guide pulley at the top right of the engine. Pop the small cover off the front of the pulley, and use a 6 mm allen on the bolt in the center of it.

6. If you’re going to remove all the coolant pipes to renew the O-rings and thermostat, you’ll need to remove the plastic shrouds that protect some electrical bits at the top left and right of the engine. Each one has three 5 mm allen head bolts holding it in place. The one on the left cylinder head is a particular pain. It requires disconnecting some vacuum lines and electrical connectors from switches associated with the air injection system. Then you have to battle the power steering reservoir hoses on the lower end of it. It will come out, but it isn’t easy. I ended up breaking the shroud at its thinnest point as I pushed it back into place.



7. Remove the thermostat and the coolant pipes from the cylinder heads. Start by removing the 4 bolts (5 mm allen) holding the thermostat housing. I thought it would be a piece of cake to remove the thermostat at this point, but the built-in engine lifting eye blocks removal as seen in the pic below. And, the thermostat blocks removal of the bolts holding the eye in place from what I could tell. I ended up removing the thermostat housing and the coolant pipes from the cylinder heads as one unit. Remove the 4 bolts (2 on each side, 6 mm allen) holding the coolant pipes to the cylinder heads. Pry the coolant pipes from the cylinder heads. There was a lot of corrosion and crud built up in the joints so it was difficult to remove the pipes.





8. Clean all the joints and mating surfaces where O-rings seal the pipes. This pic is of the thermostat housing seal. All of the joints looked like this.



I used a wire wheel bit on a Dremel tool on all the O-ring seats. It took a little over an hour. This is where doing your own work becomes satisfying. No mechanic who wants to be profitable would take all the time necessary to really clean things up good. Here are the results. Some pitting from corrosion has occurred, but mostly it’s external to where the O-rings seal the joints.



I’m a little concerned about some larger pits on the underside of the thermostat housing, where it meets the water pump. Hopefully, the O-ring will seal it OK.



9. Remove the water pump. Remove the 10 bolts (nine 13 mm and one 6 mm allen) holding the water pump to the engine.



10. Scrape away the old gasket and clean the surface. I used the Dremel wire wheel again. Here’s the old gasket.



And, here’s the cleaned up surface.



11. Fit the new water pump with a new gasket. Directions on www.alldatadiy.com specifically say not to use any gasket sealant. It’s difficult, however, to get the new dry gasket to stay in place as you fit the pump. What I did was dab a very small amount of silicone gasket sealant on the very outer edge of the bolt hole “ears� on the gasket then placed the gasket on the engine block. That was enough to stick it in place. Torque bolts to 21 Nm (not very much at all, but it’s enough).

12. Fit all the new O-rings, install the new thermostat, and reinstall the thermostat housing and coolant pipes on the cylinder heads. I wet the new O-rings with distilled water as a lubricant to help with installation. I had to knock the thermostat housing slightly with a hammer to get the thermostat bolt holes to line up with the water pump again. The power steering pump reservoir hoses have to get squished a little for the thermostat housing to line up correctly.

13. Reinstall the pulleys. Torque bolts to 10 Nm. I had one issue reinstalling my water pump pulley. The water pump has a drain or vent pipe exiting just behind the pump pulley. I suppose this allows the air in the cavity between the inner and outer shaft bearings to escape as the engine heats up in order to prevent the seals from being pushed out of place from gas pressure. It also could be a coolant drain in the event of failure of the inner seal.



Well, this tube comes pretty close to the back side of the pulley, which has a strange lip all the way around it. My guess is that the tube sort of fits inside this lip, which helps to prevent water, salt, and any other debris from entering the cavity and corroding the pump bearings from the inside out.



The pump I bought is made by a German company called LASO. Apparently it’s not OEM since the pulley came into contact with this tube and couldn’t be installed. I used my trusty Dremel with a cut-off wheel to hack the drain pipe a bit to make clearance for the pulley.



14. Reinstall everything else in reverse order of removal. The small guide pulley gets 30 Nm.

15. Refill with coolant (50/50 mix of distilled water and MB factory coolant). Start and run until warm with the heater running to fully circulate the coolant and clear out air bubbles. Top off the coolant as necessary, and check for leaks.

16. It’s probably a good idea to replenish the lost transmission fluid. Not much comes comes out, but it’s worth making sure the transmission is filled properly. Unfortunately, you have to break the red plastic clip on the dipstick tube cover to be able to add fluid, and you have to buy a dipstick to measure the fluid level properly at 80 degrees C fluid temp. Thank you, Mercedes-Benz, for making simple maintenance difficult.

Brett
 

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Premium Member
1997 S600 (sold)
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4,660 Posts
Addendum: A case of a plugged pressure shut-off mechanism in the new style pump

h. A case of a plugged line to the pressure shut-off switch diaphragm in the newer style pump.

A boarder (GotBenz) posted that he was experiencing the typical loss of function of the doors and trunk one at a time in rapid succession. The fact that all the lines were affected is indicative of a problem central to the pump rather than a leak in a single line. He found he had the new style pump in his W140. When he tried to turn the copper screw of the shut-off switch mechanism, it seemed really stiff and resisted adjustment. (I only know this pump from a picture. I’ve assumed that the screw is a pressure shut-off adjustment, but if it is fixed, then the shut-off pressure may not be adjustable. I’ll update my info when I learn more about the shut-off mechanism of the new style pump.) GotBenz then attempted to adjust the shut-off pressure by shortening the distance between the switch contacts by dabbing solder on the moving copper arm of the switch. It didn’t work reliably. I suggested that he take a close look at the shut-off mechanism while in operation, and he found that the copper arm of the shut-off switch was barely moving. Further investigation revealed the culprit. The pump head is made of a black material that produces a fine powder as it wears. It may be graphite or just a plastic. This powder had plugged the line going to the pressure shut-off diaphragm, so the switch wasn’t operating properly. GotBenz simply removed the plugged plastic part and blew backwards through the line ejecting the powder. Upon reassembly, the shut-off switch was back to normal operation, and pump operation was completely restored. In his own words, “so.. with a swift blow through one of the air inputs, a large, rather hideous cloud of "black smoke" came spewing out the other nozzle. Be careful and point the air nozzle away from face when doing this.. or suffer the consequences like i did.. haha.. anyways, reassemble air hose, and problem fixed!� The pic below points out the part where the blockage had occurred.

 
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RE: Knowlege base

Great post on the water pump. IMHO this is something that needs to come off as preventative maint. My best guess is 100K miles, I did mine around 70k.

Your level of notable work is outstanding. No, not many would have cleaned up the metal, and if left unchecked could have eventually corroded into the block, and very well demanded a replacement before 250k miles.

But a little foresight and attention as you have given will keep a motor (even a 120) running for 1/2 mil plus.

It's just a shame some say (I'm now speaking in my most redneck voice) "Well sheet, I never done nothin like clean a pump housing like that in 10 years ain't gonna start now - Hey Vern! Gimme another Buttweiser..." lol

More power to you Brett - it's all in the attitude
 

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1992 600SEL
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150 Posts
Switchblabe key 1992 (mechanical)

Hi,
My key would not flip closed except by forcing it and then it would not flip open except by prying it open. It pokes a hole in your pocket and scratches things when you keep it open all the time.
Fix:
Disassemble key:
Remove battery covery, batteries.
Find and remove small silver, "dovetail" shaped metal clip in cavity of key body. This holds the two halves of the key together.
Pry two halves of key body apart beginning near pivot. The two halves are connected by a flat electrical cable, fragile.
The key pivot will come off.
There is a clever torsion and compression spring inside the release push button. This must be preloaded in torsion upon assembly or the key won't flip open. Re-assemble carefully.
For me the mechanism worked fine at this point, I hope it does for you. I imagine it was dropped once and the torsion spring jumped from its locating notch.
If you have similar problem I hope this helps, if not message me and I'll try to fix it for you. No charge.
Dave McK.
 

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SEC 600 V12 2dr COUPE (RHD) One of the chosen few.
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2,233 Posts
Discussion Starter #53
Error codes for the Becker Mexico 14-15 series

Error Codes "E CODE"

"NO DISPLAY"
1 Input Power to the HEAD UNIT(dash mounted) is missing. Check with volt meter to test for 12 volts
2 Fuse of the HEAD UNIT(dash mounted) is open, Replace it with a 5 amp fuse
3 HEAD UNIT(dash mounted)is defective

"E1"
1 HEAD UNIT is defective

"E2"or "E3" (Without CD Changer)

1 Input Power to the RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is missing, Check with volt meter to test for 12 volts
2 Fuse of the RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is open, Replace it with 7.5 amp fuse.
3 The BUS CABLE (gray colored) that connects to HEAD UNIT(dash mounted) to the RECEIVER UNIT(trunk mounted) is not connected or is defective.
4 RECEIVER UNIT(trunk mounted) is defective.

"E2 or "E3" (With CD Changer)

1 Input power to RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is missing, Use a voltmeter to test for 12 volts
2 Check the RECEIVER UNIT for an open fuse and replace with 7.5 amp
3 Input power to the CD CHANGER (Trunk mounted) is missing, check with volt meter to test 12 volts
4 BUS CABLE (gray colored) is defective or disconnected,
5 CD CHANGER is defective, Disconnect the CD CHANGER from the HEAD UNIT, if the E2 code disappears, Replace the CD CHANGER,
6 RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is defective.

"E4"

1 RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is defective.
2 CD CHANGER (Trunk mounted) is defective. Remove the CD CHANGER If the E4 code disappears, Replace the CD CHANGER

"E5"

1 RECEIVER UNIT (Trunk mounted) is def
 

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S320 (W140), Range Rover Evoque
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14 Posts
Merc600sec said:
IF you need to run Instrument cluster function test. To do it start engine, then press small button in the center of clock adjusting knob (not the knob itself) for more then 5 seconds. You'll need something like a sharp pencil to do it.
The first test will appear on the outside temperature display. It will read something like 35.1, were 35 is gas in the tank in liters and 1 is the number of the test. To advance to the next step pull the clock knob and turn it clockwise.
There are 9 steps:
1. Gas in the tank in liters
2. Momentary fuel consumption 34.2 is 3.4 liters per hour 2 is step number
3. Engine oil pressure in bar 20.3 means 2.0 bar step 3
4. Engine rpm x 1000
5. Engine oil level 0.5 is OK, 1.5 not OK
6. Activation of the oil pressure, fuel consumption, and fuel tank gauges - needles in the first quarteer of the dial. Indicator 0.6 for step 6
7. Activation of the oil pressure, fuel consumption, and fuel tank gauges - needles in the second quarteer of the dial. Indicator 0.7 for step 7
8. Activation of the fuel consumption, and fuel tank gauges - needles in the third quarteer of the dial. Oil pressure gauge stays in the second quarter. Indicator 0.8 for step 8
9. Activation of the fuel tank gauge, needle in the fourth quarter of the dial, oil pressure remains in the second qurter, fuel consumption remains in the third quarter. Indicator 0.9 for step 9
Done
You need to verify oil pressure reading in step 3 and gauge in steps 6...9
I have an S320 från 1998 and I ran the test or I tryed to run it but i didn't get anything in the screen (see pic 2). I just got number twelve and a "U" in the "miles"-screen (see pic 1). In picture number 1 I just put the text there (12 u) so you can understand better.
 

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