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Today i replaced the fuel injection air flow meter boot, time consuming but easy, a lot of cleaning involved.

parts needed:
Air Intake Boot Below AirFlowSensor GENUINE, part # 103-141-00-90
Hose Clamp - Genuine BMW 70-90 mm Range / 9 mm Width, part # 07-12-9-952-13.
Fuel Distributor Seal - at the base of the Fuel Distributor Part #: 004-997-06-48 (since you are working there i recommend replacing it since the meter outside)
EHA valve green O-Rings, part # 012-997-97-48
Fuel Injection Idle Air Control Valve Hose, Part # 1030940482
Fuel Injection Idle Air Control Valve Hose, Part # 1030941382
Air hose connector, Part #: 102-094-02


Step 1: disconnect the battery. Remove the fuel hoses from both sides (fuel distributor and injection side), mark them first from 1 to 6 on the fuel distributor and the hoses using a marker.
Step 2: remove the 10mm x 3 nuts on the fuel meter. and the big clamp that securing the boot to the throttle body.
Step 3: now the fuel meter is ready to be removed, give it a good clean from outside, do not let anything get inside the fuel distributor.
Step 4: Remove the 10 mm x 11 bolts from both sides of the meter to remove the flange and old boot.
Step 5: Using carb cleaner or brake cleaner spray, give the meter a good clean from inside.
Step 6: Remove the the 3 bolts that holding the fuel distrubutor to the meter to replace the base seal Part #: 004-997-06-48
Step 7: Remove the EHA to replace the 2 O-rings behind the sensor, part # 012-997-97-48
Step 8: install the new boot, flange and bolts that securing it.
Step 9: install the hose connector Part #: 102-094-02 to the meter boot and then part #1030941382 to it.
Step 10: spend a good time cleaning the therottle body, cruise control, accelerator and pedal linkages using small wire brush and carb cleaner, using a flat head screwdriver disassemble the linkages (the ones like dog bones) and clean them from inside and use new lubricant. be careful not to change their adjustment.
Step 10: Replace the 2 rubber connections underneath the meter for the throttle linkage door.
Step 11: Remove the cold start sensor valve and the hose clamp to replace part # 1030940482.
Step 12: Start the installation process by following the reverse disassembly steps.
Step 13: Remove the 10 mm bolt in the middle of the mass air flow meter door, and the 2 hex that holds the vertical peace of metal if you are having a problem getting the new flexible rubber boot neck into the throttle body, remove these parts to push and secure the boot from inside.

Let me know if you have any questions.
 

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Thanks much for posting this, @Faiz Jan! I am about to attempt the same on my 560. I know there are differences between the 6 and 8 cylinders, but it's generally the same design.

One question: It looks like you removed the fuel distributor from the airflow housing. Can you help me understand why? I was looking in the service manual for my car and it seemed to me like I would not need to remove the fuel distributor in order to replace the rubber boot on the bottom of the airflow housing. I was planning on removing them from the engine as a unit (together) and then simply removing the rubber boot + flange from the bottom of the airflow housing. Is that not possible with the fuel distributor attached?
 

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Yours is a nicely detailed write-up Faiz Jan.. and that's the very cleanest throttle linkage I think I've seen man.. Well done.

Hey RobertD,

I'd have you look at the M117_56/073-225.pdf titled: Removal, reinstallation of mixture control unit. I think that's what you are getting at, and that is how I envision doing so on a V8.

M.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you so much !!!
there is a seal between the fuel distributor and the air flow meter Part #: 004-997-06-48, since you are working there i recommend replacing it so you don't have to worry about it in the future. once you remove the fuel distributor you will see it.


Thanks much for posting this, @Faiz Jan! I am about to attempt the same on my 560. I know there are differences between the 6 and 8 cylinders, but it's generally the same design.

One question: It looks like you removed the fuel distributor from the airflow housing. Can you help me understand why? I was looking in the service manual for my car and it seemed to me like I would not need to remove the fuel distributor in order to replace the rubber boot on the bottom of the airflow housing. I was planning on removing them from the engine as a unit (together) and then simply removing the rubber boot + flange from the bottom of the airflow housing. Is that not possible with the fuel distributor attached?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you man !!!

Yours is a nicely detailed write-up Faiz Jan.. and that's the very cleanest throttle linkage I think I've seen man.. Well done.

Hey RobertD,

I'd have you look at the M117_56/073-225.pdf titled: Removal, reinstallation of mixture control unit. I think that's what you are getting at, and that is how I envision doing so on a V8.

M.
 

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I'd have you look at the M117_56/073-225.pdf titled: Removal, reinstallation of mixture control unit. I think that's what you are getting at, and that is how I envision doing so on a V8.
Thank you! Yes, I've had a look at the service manual (I've got a hard copy). That's actually what prompted my question - the manual suggests you can just remove the whole thing with distributor as a unit. And @Faiz Jan 's reply confirmed that - there's no need per se to remove the fuel distributor, it's just a good idea to renew the gasket between it and the airflow housing while you're in there. All clear to me now, thanks everyone!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i did a cigar test at home ($3 cigar from HEB and Multi-Use Transfer Pump from Harbor freight $6.99) and i taped the cigar to the pump using duct tape :grin, i found a couple leaking area, so i decided to replace everything on my way related to the vacuum system. rubber connectors, meter boot, vacuum lines ... etc

Thank you! Yes, I've had a look at the service manual (I've got a hard copy). That's actually what prompted my question - the manual suggests you can just remove the whole thing with distributor as a unit. And @Faiz Jan 's reply confirmed that - there's no need per se to remove the fuel distributor, it's just a good idea to renew the gasket between it and the airflow housing while you're in there. All clear to me now, thanks everyone!
 

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Cigar Test

i did a cigar test at home ($3 cigar from HEB and Multi-Use Transfer Pump from Harbor freight $6.99) and i taped the cigar to the pump using duct tape :grin, i found a couple leaking area, so i decided to replace everything on my way related to the vacuum system. rubber connectors, meter boot, vacuum lines ... etc
That picture...

Now, all we need is the step by step write-up...

Seriously, That's a terrif DIY tool worthy of its own presence.

M
 

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I am about to attempt the same on my 560. I know there are differences between the 6 and 8 cylinders, but it's generally the same design.
There is one difference that you should be aware of on such a job and I did not see anything mentioned about it in post # 1, assuming I read post #1 correctly: on your engine you cannot just install the new rubber boot using the old flange. A new flange needs to be bought and installed, PN 1161410645. The new boots are meant to be used with that part. You buy it once only per engine, then you can replace as many boots as you like on that engine using the same flange.

The quality ones (MB) are not cheap, so you may want to factor that in your budget too.
 

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A new flange needs to be bought and installed, PN 1161410645. The new boots are meant to be used with that part. You buy it once only per engine, then you can replace as many boots as you like on that engine using the same flange.
The quality ones (MB) are not cheap, so you may want to factor that in your budget too.
Thank you! Yes, I've got a new flange in my shopping cart at Pelican, just waiting to pull the trigger. Thanks for the advice on getting the more expensive M-B part.

Sent from my moto x4 using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ohhh i didn't know that, is it for 560 only ? i didn't see anything online about replacing the flange anywhere, the good thing is the smoke test is showing 0 leaks right now.and the engine is running great

There is one difference that you should be aware of on such a job and I did not see anything mentioned about it in post # 1, assuming I read post #1 correctly: on your engine you cannot just install the new rubber boot using the old flange. A new flange needs to be bought and installed, PN 1161410645. The new boots are meant to be used with that part. You buy it once only per engine, then you can replace as many boots as you like on that engine using the same flange.

The quality ones (MB) are not cheap, so you may want to factor that in your budget too.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
sure, follow the below steps:

1- Any cheap cigar from any gas station or grocery store.
2- Harbor freight multi use transfer pump https://www.harborfreight.com/multi-use-transfer-pump-63144.html
3- Attach the cigar to where it says "In" and use some duct tape to secure the cigar and keep in tight to make sure the pump will suck the air from the other side of the cigar.
4- Unscrew the vacume hose (the first picture) and use the connections that provided with the pump to secure the "out" hose from the pump.
5- remove the air filter housing, and block the intake using a heavy duty rubber glove and tie it ends using zip ties, so when you pump the smoke inside the system the glove will not leak. (the second picture).
6- Block the breather hoses from the engine side using a wine cork.
7- light your cigar and start pumping, my wife helped me with the pump and i started looking for the leak points.


That picture...

Now, all we need is the step by step write-up...

Seriously, That's a terrif DIY tool worthy of its own presence.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #16
:grin the car raised the middle finger for me when i was searching for the leaks :grin, then when i re-did the test after finding and fixing all the leaky points, only thump was raised up


I like that glove pumped up, but all fingers are raised .... it should have been only one.:grin
 

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Discussion Starter #17
by the way i used the same technique "the glove box" one, the one i posted its an online picture as i forgot to take pictures during this process.


I like that glove pumped up, but all fingers are raised .... it should have been only one.:grin
 
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