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Discussion Starter #1
It might just be me but I spent an awful lot of time raising and lowering the roof on my 03 SL500. I mean a LOT. So much so, that my wife cautioned me, "You're going to wear that thing out". As with most things I ignored her warnings and then a few month's back it happened. The front latch for the roof blew a seal and my roof and door trim filled with hydraulic fluid. She is ALWAYS right :(. A little research online and a quick call to Skyland in NC had both the replacement trim and the latch headed my way. My trusty mechanic tackled the job and we had it back on the road in about 2 weeks. Unfortunately, my glee was short lived as top started to slow down to the point it would timeout before finishing its cycle. It usually stopped prior to the latching of the roof or the trunk closing completely. My SL has the Smart Top mod and as such I think it really proved to be a good indicator that I had some performance issues by not getting all the way open or all the way closed. Working on the web and in the forums I learned that Top Hydraulics up in the Northwest not only provided good information they had good pricing. This discovery led to about a 4 week effort to diagnose and repair my problem. I got a pump rebuilt but after testing Klaus at TH noted the pump was old but not really bad enough to cause the issues I had. From there we picked the most likely rams that needed overhaul and I dutifully had my tech remove them and we shipped them off for rebuild. If it had not been for the expert advice from Klaus and quick action on the part of my mechanic I might have missed the whole summer. As it turned out the team at TH took excellent care of me and my wallet.
 

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sprucegoose, good to hear that you got it all straightened out. I have a question for your...after replacing the rams did you have to reset the roof with the Star system?

The reason I ask is that I had a fastener/bolt (the one that connects the ram to the hinge) literally fall out of the 7 way hinge - disconnecting the ram on the right side - there were no leaks, nothing broken, simply a bolt that came loose.

I replaced the fastener by pushing the arm back into the ram and aligning the bolt.

Now the trunk lid doesn't close all the way at that corner. If I push down very hard it will eventually close and the message on the dash says it's closed. The roof itself works perfectly - up and down just fine, it's the last few inches of the trunk lid closing at the right front corner and latching, where it hangs up.


I'm told that it's an easy fix with the software, but I'd like to know for sure.
 

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03 SL Kleemann, 97 SL320, 95 E320 cab, Tesla X, Ferrari 360, etc
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sprucegoose,

thank you for the summary, and for pointing folks to Top Hydraulics' services and products. Allow me to chop up your post and to comment below.

The front latch for the roof blew a seal and my roof and door trim filled with hydraulic fluid.
Bummer about the headliner and door trim getting soaked. The top lock cylinder 2308000872 (A230 800 08 72) is usually the first cylinder to fail, out of a total of eleven hydraulic cylinders in your Vario roof and roll over bar system. I will get into more detail below. You clearly want to get the cylinder upgraded, instead of buying the same future problem again. Top Hydraulics offers rebuild service for any or all R230 cylinder(s) that you send in first, or core exchange. In either case, it's a lot cheaper and far better than brand new parts. See Mercedes Cylinders R230 SL-Class 03-11 - Top Hydraulics, Inc.
Okay, you got this one taken care of, then came the next problem:

Unfortunately, my glee was short lived as top started to slow down to the point it would timeout before finishing its cycle. It usually stopped prior to the latching of the roof or the trunk closing completely. [...] I got a pump rebuilt but after testing Klaus at TH noted the pump was old but not really bad enough to cause the issues I had.
Your Vario roof pump 2308000348 (p/n directly on the pump is 2308000030) was indeed close to failure, but this wasn't the reason for the top slowing down. I will explain the reason for the slow top below - let's cover the pump briefly.

The R230 Vario roof hydraulic pumps are definitely high-end compared to the about hundred other models that we rebuild at Top Hydraulics - higher than average pressure, flow and number of functions in the valve block. They do not necessarily fail sooner than the average regular cabriolet hydraulic pump, but they are very likely to fail at some point in the life span of an R230. There is a multitude of reasons why the R230 pumps fail. Top Hydraulics upgrades critical components and makes these pumps better than brand new ones, for a fraction of dealer price. See Rebuild & Upgrade Service for 03-11 Mercedes Benz R230 SL-Class Hydraulic Pump - Top Hydraulics, Inc

Pump part numbers are A230 800 03 48 and A230 800 00 88, although you will typically see a sticker with numbers A230 800 00 30 or A230 800 03 30 on the pump itself.

From there we picked the most likely rams that needed overhaul and I dutifully had my tech remove them and we shipped them off for rebuild.
Four of the Vario roof cylinders always get pressurized on one side when the pump is running (except for later model pumps pressurizing only the trunk lid assist cylinder when turning counter-clockwise). Those cylinders are the top lock cylinder A230 800 08 72, the two Frame Lock Cylinders A230 800 09 72 and A230 800 10 72, and the Trunk Lid Frame Cylinder A230 800 13 72. If any one of these cylinders had an internal leak (past the piston inside), then that will rob power from the pump, thus slowing the top down. Attached to the bottom of this post is a location diagram for all R230 hydraulic cylinders.

Since the top lock cylinder had just been swapped, and the trunk lid frame cylinder is typically the last one to leak internally, I suggested to sprucegoose that likely one of the Frame Lock Cylinders had an internal leak. There is a way to test these cylinders for internal leaks in the car, without the fancy Mercedes leak testing tool, but it is a better use of everyone's time to just have all three of the locking cylinders and the trunk lid frame cylinder rebuilt & upgraded at the same time. 2308000972, 2308001072, and 2308001372 are the easiest ones to remove from the car.

I am attaching a picture of the bad piston seal to the bottom of this post.

It might just be me but I spent an awful lot of time raising and lowering the roof on my 03 SL500. I mean a LOT. So much so, that my wife cautioned me, "You're going to wear that thing out".
No worries - the hydraulic system is designed for 10,000 cycles. It is not frequent use that makes the cylinders and pumps fail. This happens to ALL modern convertibles, as they are all using the same seal material in the hydraulic cylinders. It may just be an unwritten pact between the parts manufactures and the car manufacturers to use seals that will decay within 10-15 years, or even faster in hot climates...

Klaus

www.tophydraulicinc.com

 

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Old thread revival, I know. Just wanted to send a shout out to Klaus at Top Hydraulics for helping me out and being very patient and understanding about my problem.

Thankfully my fix was a simple matter of adding fluid to the hydraulic pump in the trunk, left side of the spare tire tub. I'm not sure why people are drilling a hole in the pump housing? The front recessed Allen head screw on top of the pump is where I topped up with the Pentosin CHF-11S fluid from my local Carquest store. I'm guessing I was 1-2 ounces low. I had wanted to get a syringe and measure how much I added but ended up drizzling the fluid into the pump down a piece of wire so the air could escape.

I've owned the car (2003 SL55 AMG) only two months but noticed the top would not open consistently and would routinely stall or go very slow at several stages of the open or close process; usually at liftoff from the windshield or closing the trunk lid. Alternating "open, close, open" several times usually got it to complete the cycle but the inconsistency was very annoying and becoming more frequent.

Thanks to Klaus' patient guidance I was able to top up the system and it is working great!

I have a couple questions though. Should I fill the pump all the way to the bottom of the threads or leave some air space? Also, the fluid has to be going somewhere but I don't see any leaks at any of the pistons or fittings...

I hope this helps others.
 

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harderkev,

welcome to the forum, and thanks for the detailed description. You have a temporary fix, as there is obviously a leak somewhere. I will comment below.

Thankfully my fix was a simple matter of adding fluid to the hydraulic pump in the trunk, left side of the spare tire tub. I'm not sure why people are drilling a hole in the pump housing? The front recessed Allen head screw on top of the pump is where I topped up with the Pentosin CHF-11S fluid from my local Carquest store. I'm guessing I was 1-2 ounces low. I had wanted to get a syringe and measure how much I added but ended up drizzling the fluid into the pump down a piece of wire so the air could escape.[...]
I have a couple questions though. Should I fill the pump all the way to the bottom of the threads or leave some air space? Also, the fluid has to be going somewhere but I don't see any leaks at any of the pistons or fittings...
In response:

1) Indeed, it is easy to access the pump with its attached reservoir, even with the top down. The pump is located next to the spare tire in the trunk. You only need to lift and/or remove the trunk's bottom panel.

2) Model year '06+ pumps are filled through a fill port in the rear of the reservoir, and they are filled basically to the height of the fill hole.

3) On early model years ('03-'05), filling the pump can be a bit time consuming when you don't have special tools for it. [Mercedes sells a special (= expensive) syringe for filling the pump. Top Hydraulics has come up with a much more economical version, and I will post separately about it in this thread once we are ready to ship it.] There are two Allen bolts next to each other on top of the pump. The front one is the fill plug, and the rear one serves as a port for measuring pressure or venting the reservoir when you are filling through the front one. It is not unusual for some fluid (a fraction of an ounce) to come squirting out the first plug that you remove. This is related to some air pressure having built up in the reservoir, and it is not a technical issue to worry about. Early model pumps have Min/Max markers on the rear, flat end of the reservoir.

4) Drilling a fill hole into the reservoir for filling it is a terrible idea. In most cases, the pump gets damaged from the plastic shavings.

5) Pentosin CHF-11S is fully compatible with the R230's Vario roof hydraulic system, and it can be mixed with the original A 000 989 91 03 (10) fluid. By the way, Mercedes fluid 0009899103 is identical to FeBi 02615 (outside of FeBi not having a dye in it), and FeBi 02615 is widely available online. I am not a big fan of CHF-11S because it has more of an odor to it. If you have a leak in your hydraulic system, then you will smell the results a lot longer in your car. Of course, it is safe to use if you had all eleven cylinders upgraded by Top Hydraulics... :wink

6) Since adding fluid to your Vario roof hydraulic system fixed the problem, your pump was obviously too low on fluid. By the same token, this is a temporary fix. The hydraulic fluid doesn't evaporate, so you are having a leak somewhere. You have to find the leak. Check out the location diagram in my previous post. R230 hydraulic cylinders typically leak first from the rod seal, located where the polished shaft comes out of the cylinder housing.

7) Typically, the first cylinder to fail is the top lock cylinder (also known as front lock cylinder) A 230 800 08 72. When it fails, it will start soaking your headliner with hydraulic fluid, and eventually the whole mess can either drip onto your seats or the interior door trim. Do not try DIY seal replacement on the cylinder - it's a dead end that will only make things worse. To inspect the top lock cylinder 2308000072, you need to remove the headliner. To remove the headliner, you need to partially open the roof. That will expose some torx bolts in the front of the top panel, which are holding the panel in place. Attached below is a picture that shows the top lock cylinder after headliner removal. The perspective of the photo is a bit odd; it is basically taken while looking up from the passenger seat with the top closed.

Klaus

www.tophydraulicsinc.com
 

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harderkev,

welcome to the forum, and thanks for the detailed description. You have a temporary fix, as there is obviously a leak somewhere. I will comment below.



In response:

1) Indeed, it is easy to access the pump with its attached reservoir, even with the top down. The pump is located next to the spare tire in the trunk. You only need to lift and/or remove the trunk's bottom panel.

2) Model year '06+ pumps are filled through a fill port in the rear of the reservoir, and they are filled basically to the height of the fill hole.

3) On early model years ('03-'05), filling the pump can be a bit time consuming when you don't have special tools for it. [Mercedes sells a special (= expensive) syringe for filling the pump. Top Hydraulics has come up with a much more economical version, and I will post separately about it in this thread once we are ready to ship it.] There are two Allen bolts next to each other on top of the pump. The front one is the fill plug, and the rear one serves as a port for measuring pressure or venting the reservoir when you are filling through the front one. It is not unusual for some fluid (a fraction of an ounce) to come squirting out the first plug that you remove. This is related to some air pressure having built up in the reservoir, and it is not a technical issue to worry about. Early model pumps have Min/Max markers on the rear, flat end of the reservoir.

4) Drilling a fill hole into the reservoir for filling it is a terrible idea. In most cases, the pump gets damaged from the plastic shavings.

5) Pentosin CHF-11S is fully compatible with the R230's Vario roof hydraulic system, and it can be mixed with the original A 000 989 91 03 (10) fluid. By the way, Mercedes fluid 0009899103 is identical to FeBi 02615 (outside of FeBi not having a dye in it), and FeBi 02615 is widely available online. I am not a big fan of CHF-11S because it has more of an odor to it. If you have a leak in your hydraulic system, then you will smell the results a lot longer in your car. Of course, it is safe to use if you had all eleven cylinders upgraded by Top Hydraulics... :wink

6) Since adding fluid to your Vario roof hydraulic system fixed the problem, your pump was obviously too low on fluid. By the same token, this is a temporary fix. The hydraulic fluid doesn't evaporate, so you are having a leak somewhere. You have to find the leak. Check out the location diagram in my previous post. R230 hydraulic cylinders typically leak first from the rod seal, located where the polished shaft comes out of the cylinder housing.

7) Typically, the first cylinder to fail is the top lock cylinder (also known as front lock cylinder) A 230 800 08 72. When it fails, it will start soaking your headliner with hydraulic fluid, and eventually the whole mess can either drip onto your seats or the interior door trim. Do not try DIY seal replacement on the cylinder - it's a dead end that will only make things worse. To inspect the top lock cylinder 2308000072, you need to remove the headliner. To remove the headliner, you need to partially open the roof. That will expose some torx bolts in the front of the top panel, which are holding the panel in place. Attached below is a picture that shows the top lock cylinder after headliner removal. The perspective of the photo is a bit odd; it is basically taken while looking up from the passenger seat with the top closed.

Klaus

Top Hydraulics | Rebuilt and Upgraded Convertible Top Cylinders, Pumps, Hydraulic Lines - Top Hydraulics, Inc
any update on the syringe tool? I'm sure my top fluid has never been changed (its a 2003) and I'd like to tackle that project.
 

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Wow VERY informative thread!

I'd love to head any progress on the syringe tool as well. I'd love to change out the fluid on my 2005 SL55. I'm all about preventive maintenance.

Klaus, in your expert opinion as it sounds like you've worked on just about every hydraulic roof system out there - what are your opinions of the Mercedes Vario-roof, particularly the R230 SL's? Excellent design? Good design? Poor design?

It sounds like the pump is easy enough to change out in the event of a failure as it's right in the spare tire area so accessibility should not be too bad. Are the various top cylinders (relatively) easy to change in the event of a failure?

Thanks!
 

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Joining others in the interest in the tool for adding fluid. I'd also like to purge the old fluid here, as I've done on the ABC system. So - any help along those lines is very much appreciated as well. :smile
 

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Flushing the R230 Vario roof hydraulic system

carguyshu, vtvette, and Gary Knox, thank you very much for emphasizing the subject of flushing the convertible top hydraulic system. I agree that preventative maintenance is generally a very good investment. I will add the conclusion first, for those who don't want to read through the rest of my long winded response: it is quite difficult to flush the R230 Vario roof system, and this is the only convertible so far, for which I do not recommend flushing before you have cylinder or pump failures.

This is a bit different from the ABC suspension system, where I have seen lots of small shavings from the tandem pump bushings in the fluid, and some pretty large shavings caught by the magnets inside the ABC shocks. In convertible top hydraulic systems, we are dealing with far less aggressive contamination, albeit not completely harmless.

In general, it is very good to flush convertible top hydraulic systems every 5-10 years, but that is difficult on the R230, and it is not quite as important on this model as on almost any other model we are working on. The R230 system is indeed special...

Technical details:

The R230 pump is very complex - the eleven hydraulic cylinders are more or less standard technology. The early model pumps ('03-'05) are beautiful pieces of engineering. The later ones have too small an electric motor in them (in my humble opinion). Both versions have some flaws that we eliminate with our rebuilds and upgrades. On the hydraulic cylinders, nobody can tell me that the engineers didn't know those seals would fall apart after 10-15 years...

Details about fluid contamination:

In general, the biggest problems in terms of contaminated hydraulic fluid are:
1) Water from condensation
2) Wrong fluid or additives
3) Small particles
4) A hole drilled in the reservoir

1) Water is normally introduced by condensation. Water in the fluid can wreak havoc. It corrodes the system and it makes even brand new OEM seals disintegrate very quickly. The R230 system is one of the few systems that is completely enclosed. Others have the ability to breathe, and the changing fluid level in the reservoir pulls in humidity from the outside. That's why convertible top hydraulic fluids are formulated without emulsifiers, so that water sinks to the bottom of the reservoir. Unless someone drills a hole in the reservoir, water is not an issue before the cylinder seals fail and water could be sucked into the system via manual top operation. I've seen it, but it's rare. Top Hydraulics' seals are not sensitive to water.

2) Wrong fluid or additives. The biggest threat here is to the cylinder and pump seals, which can fall apart when exposed to the wrong fluid. Especially "Stop-Leak" type additives will guarantee that you will be sending us the whole set of cylinders much sooner than planned. If you have such additives in the system, then they will hydrolize and disintegrate OEM seals quite fast. Top Hydraulics' seals are not sensitive to such additives.

3) Small particles. Your hydraulic fluid will darken with time from tiny, oxidized metal particles that rub off the cylinder walls during normal operation, and from tiny remnants of disintegrating seals. Oxidized, suspended particles in the fluid generally make the fluid a bit more aggressive. In the R230, this is not normally a threat to the system before the first one of eleven hydraulic cylinders springs a leak. Again, this is not anywhere near as serious as in the ABC system.

4) A hole drilled in the reservoir. We see it all too often that tiny shavings from drilling a hole in the reservoir make it into the pump's valve block and ruin it. On top of that, the system will not be fully sealed any more, and allow water condensation in the reservoir. This is really covered by the three points above already, but it aggravates me enough that I have to mention it again... ;-)

Why not flush the R230 vario roof system to prevent failures?

A) The main objective would be to slow the decay of the hydraulic cylinder and pump seals. This is a process that cannot be prevented with good fluid, and the chemical difference between new and old fluid is relatively small in R230s. The problem starts once the seals are really falling apart and bigger chunks of material make it into the system. I will cover that below.

B) Completely flushing the R230 system is really difficult without taking the pump apart. The most difficult part is emptying the reservoir and the rest of the system. You cannot just suck the fluid out with a syringe. I advise against taking off the reservoir, because most people ruin it during that effort, and you will have a mess at your hands. Do not pry it off with a screwdriver. (It is rare that we get R230 pumps in for rebuild that have been partially disassembled by their owner and NOT substantially damaged during the process.) If you were to set up a purge system where the pump spits out old fluid from one port and sucks in new fluid from another, then you would still be exchanging only a fairly small fraction of the system's fluid. I have given this a lot of thought, and have come to the conclusion that it's best to leave the system alone until you have hydraulic cylinders leaking. This conclusion is based on a lot of experience.

C) Once you have leaking cylinders, it is about time to change the fluid. At this point, larger seal fragments could impact the valve block, or they could disintegrate into enough small particles to clog screens and filters inside the pump (which are not user-accessible). This is when you are doing serious work to the system, anyway, and this is usually when the reservoir has been emptied already. If you simply refill the reservoir at this point, then you will be replacing about 1/3 of the fluid in the system. That's a good start. Theoretically, you could operate the top a couple of times afterwards (thus mixing new and old fluid) and after that have the pump force out fluid through a pressure port until the reservoir is empty again. That could be really messy, and it would take a few of these cycles to give the system a decent flush. For those who got caught by surprise when the first cylinder failed, and they want to replace just that one cylinder quickly, I would suggest to refill the reservoir and plan on tackling the whole system at a more opportune time.

D) Tackle upgrading the whole system (cylinders and pump) at an opportune time, or flush the system when the pump fails. Most pumps and cylinders will fail during the lifetime of your R230, and probably sooner than you were expecting. If you want to do some serious preventative maintenance, consider having your hydraulic system upgraded before it fails.
Filling the pump: When you get a rebuilt and upgraded pump from Top Hydraulics, it obviously arrives clean. It will come with instructions on how to flush the system. Before you replace the pump, stick all hydraulic lines in a waste container and manually cycle the top. That pumps all old fluid out of the system. Once the lines are reconnected, you will only have to keep topping off the fluid level until all air is out of the system. If you had the whole system (pumps and cylinders) rebuilt and upgraded at the same time, then there is obviously no old fluid left. The system is self bleeding, and practically all air will be in the reservoir after some three top cycles. The front lock may need as many as five cycles, but it displaces only a small volume. To refill the pump on model years '03-'05, remove the two plugs on top, thread on the syringe supplied by Top Hydraulics, and fill through the fill hole next to the motor until there is no more air coming out of the pressure port.

I hope this makes sense, and I haven't oversimplified things for those who want to know every detail, or made it too boring for folks who don't care about the details I have given.

Klaus

www.tophydraulicsinc.com
 

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Klaus,
thanks a lot for this extensive and very informative writeup.
Due to shipping & tax, can you recommend someone for these jobs in germany ?

Cheers, Frank
 

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Klaus,

Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge about the hydraulic system for raising/lowering tops on the R230 cars. I REALLY appreciate what you have taught me in this thread!!

Top Hydraulics is CERTAINLY the place I'll contact if (maybe when) I have any issues with the vario-roof system on MY car!!

THANKS again for your great service and sharing.
 

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Due to shipping & tax, can you recommend someone for these jobs in germany ?

Cheers, Frank
Hello Frank,

Thanks for asking. Shipping and tax are actually fairly small compared to the value you get from us. You would be paying more VAT on brand new parts in Germany than you are paying for shipping, VAT, and customs duty combined when dealing with Top Hydraulics (assuming shipping that you are shipping a set of cylinders, a pump, or cylinders and pump both ways). We ship to Germany quite frequently. If you remove the mounting frame from the pump, then you can ship the pump and all eleven cylinders together to us in a DHL 10kg package, which is not expensive to ship.

To answer your question, I am not aware of any other company worldwide that would currently be able to rebuild the Vario Roof pump and cylinders for you, and I doubt that there will be any noteworthy competition for us any time soon. It takes a lot to do this job right, and to ship parts that are truly better than the originals.

Klaus

www.tophydraulicsinc.com
 

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Just to jump in here as I know many of you from the R129 forum before you changed up to the R230 model.

For years R129 owners were plagued with the failure of the twelve hydraulic cylinders which operate the R129 soft top roof system. We would try to repair these cylinders ourselves with whatever seals we could find, or send them to fellow member that attempted to rebuild them. All of these methods came back to haunt us in a very short space of time.

The main problem was that when a cylinder is disassembled, the utmost care has to be taken not to scratch or score the walls of the cylinder. This is almost impossible unless it is performed on a specialist jig which of course none of us had. Another consideration that none of us knew about was accessing and also replacing the port seals in the cylinder.

With these ruined cylinders our only option was to buy the ridiculously expensive Mercedes-Benz original cylinders from the dealer. This in itself presents the same ticking 'time-bomb' as the seals deteriorate after a few years and you find yourself back at square one.

This dark cloud lifted a few years ago when Top Hydraulics became a BenzWorld site sponsoring vendor with Klaus Witte at the helm.
Over this period of time our R129 members have gained complete faith and trust in Klaus and Top Hydraulics.

Now with the good relationship we have have with Top Hydraulics, we simply send our cylinders to Klaus to be rebuilt.
Almost on a daily basis we get topics based on soft top hydraulic failure where most of Klaus' satisfied customers just tell them to send the cylinders to Top Hydraulics.

Another very important aspect of the trust we have in Klaus is the superb level of support that our members receive when removing or refitting cylinders, nothing is too much trouble even down to how to adjust micro switches.

Apologies for this long post but I thought I would share the story of how the most documented fault of our older R129 SL models has now been turned into a routine fix instead of the nightmare it used to be.

Best wishes to all,
James.
 

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Most likely to fail

Need to send my pump to Klaus to get rebuilt (low pressure, swapped with different pump and it cycled twice as fast) and will be including the roof lock cylinder. Do not want to send them all at once, so in order of most important which ones next?
Also, what is the easy way to test the cylinders without star and pressure gauge?
 

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Revival

Glad I found this thread as I have a leaky cylinder and this helped me understand the hydraulic system for the top. I will be calling for help tomorrow.
 

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Glad I found this thread as I have a leaky cylinder and this helped me understand the hydraulic system for the top. I will be calling for help tomorrow.
Which cylinder/cylinders on yours are leaking? I just got my SL a couple weeks ago and it has leaky cylinders as well. I believe the left side that locks the trunk as well as the rear-most one that tips it backwards.

Tim
 

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Which cylinder/cylinders on yours are leaking? I just got my SL a couple weeks ago and it has leaky cylinders as well. I believe the left side that locks the trunk as well as the rear-most one that tips it backwards.

Tim

Looking at the diagrams the leaky one on mine is the Trunk Lid Drive Cylinder. It is in the rear left corner of the trunk. Doesn't look too hard to change. There may be others since I haven't looked close yet as the top is stuck down.
Good luck with yours!
 

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Looking at the diagrams the leaky one on mine is the Trunk Lid Drive Cylinder. It is in the rear left corner of the trunk. Doesn't look too hard to change. There may be others since I haven't looked close yet as the top is stuck down.
Good luck with yours!
Thank you. Initially my driver side lock cylinder was the one that leaked, but when reassembling the system I saw that the cylinder you mention is leaking as well. It is the easiest to get to and I have mine removed now.

When do you plan on tackling yours? Do you know how to get to it?

Tim
 

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Thank you. Initially my driver side lock cylinder was the one that leaked, but when reassembling the system I saw that the cylinder you mention is leaking as well. It is the easiest to get to and I have mine removed now.

When do you plan on tackling yours? Do you know how to get to it?

Tim
It was very easy to remove and is being shipped off for repair today. :)
 

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It was very easy to remove and is being shipped off for repair today. :)
We are working in tandem then..... I removed mine Friday and yesterday (Tuesday) it was off to be repaired. I also removed to damper on the passenger side to see what shape it is in. Se ms to be fine. Good luck with yours!!!

Tim
 
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