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I heard twice on the radio newscast this morning in San Francisco<br>that DC has announced plans for 2002 to officially bring <br>the Unimog to the United States. It is unknown what channel they<br>would be sold through, but most likely it would be commercial trucks.<p>They stated a diesel only engine with turbo for all models.<br>They also stated that there would be two lengths of chassis offered,<br>and the long would be open bed rear, and the short would also be <br>offered stock in such fashion, but with an optional hardtop conversion<br>to make it more like a mega SUV. The cab would be connected apparently to this<br>back part for seating.<p>Anyone heard anything else on this?????<p><br><br><hr size=7 width=75%><p>
 

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Read all about it!!!!<br>http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/21/business/21BIG.html<p><br>: I heard twice on the radio newscast this morning in San Francisco<br>: that DC has announced plans for 2002 to officially bring <br>: the Unimog to the United States. It is unknown what channel they<br>: would be sold through, but most likely it would be commercial trucks.<p>: They stated a diesel only engine with turbo for all models.<br>: They also stated that there would be two lengths of chassis offered,<br>: and the long would be open bed rear, and the short would also be <br>: offered stock in such fashion, but with an optional hardtop conversion<br>: to make it more like a mega SUV. The cab would be connected apparently to this<br>: back part for seating.<p>: Anyone heard anything else on this?????<p><br><br><hr size=7 width=75%><p>
 

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saw it on tv.early morn news show just a picture.showed it tan<br>kind of spruced up inside .showed it on the freightliner web site.<br>but checking the web site showed nothing <br><br><hr size=7 width=75%><p>
 

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<p><p> February 21, 2001 <p> Daimler to Offer a Monster S.U.V.<p> By KEITH BRADSHER<p> ETROIT, Feb. 20 — With sport utility<br> vehicles becoming bigger and bigger,<br> perhaps it was inevitable: Freightliner, the<br> nation's biggest maker of 18-wheelers, plans<br> to start selling a four-wheel-drive vehicle that<br> dwarfs even the largest family vehicles on the<br> road.<p> Based on a German military transport, the<br> vehicle, called the Unimog, makes even the<br> Hummer look petite. It is 9 feet 7 inches tall,<br> nearly the height of a basketball net and almost<br> three feet taller than the tallest sport utility. Its<br> front seat, mounted six feet high, is reached by<br> a three-step ladder. <p> The Unimog is 20 feet long, more than a foot<br> longer than the Ford Excursion, the longest<br> sport utility on the market now. And it is<br> nearly two feet wider than a typical car and<br> 3.5 inches wider than even a Hummer, a<br> General Motors vehicle based on an<br> American military transport. The Unimog is so<br> wide that, by federal regulation, it must carry<br> truck marker lights across the top of the front<br> and back.<p> Most remarkable is the Unimog's weight: 12,500 pounds. That is more<br> than two Chevrolet Suburban sport utility vehicles or four Toyota Camry<br> sedans. The company says the vehicle gets about 10 miles to the gallon<br> of diesel fuel, less even than the most fuel-hungry sport utility vehicles and<br> pickups.<p> "You don't need roads," says the cover of the Unimog sales brochure,<br> "when you can make your own."<p> The vehicle will sell for a base price of $84,000. Freightliner will start<br> taking orders for the Unimog in October, with manufacturing to begin in<br> January, said Bruce Barnes, the Unimog marketing manager at<br> Freightliner, which is owned by DaimlerChrysler A.G. Freightliner will<br> sell the Unimog mainly in suburban markets, regardless of region.<p> The company's initial sales goals are modest. Freightliner hopes to sell<br> 1,000 a year at first, with just 250 going to individuals — affluent<br> off-road enthusiasts and people who simply like to drive noticeable<br> vehicles. "Even in Scottsdale, Ariz.," Mr. Barnes said, "moms will want to<br> take it to the grocery store. It's a head-turning vehicle."<p> The rest will go to fire departments and businesses that plan to adapt<br> them for civic and commercial use. But if the vehicle is a success,<br> production can be increased, Mr. Barnes said.<p> Ford tried to allay initial public concerns about the Excursion's size three<br> years ago by saying that it was mainly for businesses. But it has since built<br> mostly luxury versions, selling them to prosperous families.<p> The introduction of the German- built Unimog marks an international<br> escalation of the American highway arms race. A year ago, General<br> Motors acquired the rights to the Hummer, a civilian version of the<br> military's Humvee. G.M. said last summer that it would set up its first new<br> division since Saturn to design and market Hummers of various<br> dimensions and prices, with the goal of increasing sales to as many as<br> 150,000 a year from 1,000 then.<p> Mr. Barnes said Freightliner did not plan to sell anywhere near that many<br> Unimogs, because the company wants to establish a reputation for<br> off-road performance that might suffer if smaller, less expensive models<br> were introduced. <p> Freightliner describes the Unimog as an off-road vehicle, but it is not a<br> true sport utility. The $84,000 base version of the vehicle will somewhat<br> resemble a pickup truck with enormous front and side windows to help<br> drivers see the traffic below.<p> Customers may equip vehicles with a covered pickup-truck bed and<br> jump seats, and many other options are available, Mr. Barnes said.<br> "Leather interior, G.P.S. navigation systems and high-end stereo systems<br> are all available — just in case you'd like to spoil yourself," the Unimog<br> brochure says. Walnut interior trim, "mood lights" and even a vertical<br> exhaust pipe, just like the exhausts on real 18-wheelers, are also<br> optional.<p> DaimlerChrysler will build Unimogs for the American civilian market at a<br> factory in Gaggenau, Germany, about 50 miles west of Stuttgart near the<br> French border, that has been making Unimogs for German military forces<br> and farmers for 51 years. Unimog is short for "universal motor gerät,"<br> which Freightliner translates as "universal engine-driven apparatus."<p> The Unimog is far larger than Chrysler's largest sport utility, the Dodge<br> Durango. "We could carry a couple Durangos," Mr. Barnes said.<p> Retail sales of Unimogs have been weak in Germany. "There were really<br> very few vehicles being sold, for totally crazy people who wanted it," said<br> Dieter Zetsche, Chrysler's chief executive, who coincidentally ran<br> DaimlerChrysler's commercial vehicle operations until November.<p> The Unimog to be sold in the United States is considerably larger than<br> models long sold in Germany, and will have four cup holders in the doors<br> to help Americans quench their thirst while driving. <p> Unimogs will be sold and serviced by the 400 Freightliner dealers that<br> handle the company's 18-wheelers.<p> Freightliner offered the first Unimog to Arnold Schwarzenegger, the actor<br> who made the Hummer famous by using it as his personal vehicle. But the<br> truck maker never received a response and now plans to promote the<br> Unimog through off- road driving clubs and possibly with ads in<br> magazines for sport utility vehicle enthusiasts, Mr. Barnes said. The<br> company has already released a promotional brochure advertising the<br> Unimog as "tough, rugged and eminently civilized."<p> "Wanting to conquer the great outdoors is simply not a good reason to<br> give up leather and air-conditioning," says the brochure, which also has a<br> diagram of a Unimog labeled "Here's what S.U.V.'s and other so- called<br> four-by-fours will see as you drive by."<p> Freightliner is a little defensive about the width of the new, larger Unimog,<br> contending that it is still suitable for urban driving.<p> "It's highly maneuverable and at seven feet wide, it still fits in standard<br> parking spaces," the sales brochure says, reading like most sport utility<br> brochures and showing a Unimog driving past an office tower.<p> The Unimog is, in fact, 7 feet 6 inches wide when measured at the tires,<br> with the cab 7 feet wide, Mr. Barnes said.<p> The Unimog is exempt from most federal safety, air pollution and fuel<br> economy regulations because it exceeds the weight cutoffs for such rules.<br> It will meet federal air pollution standards for medium-duty trucks —<br> standards that are much more lenient than those for cars.<p> Freightliner is studying whether the Unimog can meet the more stringent<br> rules that California has set for the sale of trucks there.<p> The Unimog has a 52-gallon tank; diesel tends to produce better fuel<br> economy than gasoline. The vehicle can reach 68 miles an hour on the<br> highway — but will not be allowed on some roads and bridges,<br> particularly in the New York area, because it exceeds weight and height<br> limits. <p> New York State used to bar the registration of large trucks like the<br> Unimog as family vehicles, but changed its rules last year after heavy<br> lobbying by the auto industry. State and federal regulations only require<br> commercial drivers' licenses for vehicles weighing more than 26,000<br> pounds when fully loaded; the Unimog weighs 26,000 pounds with<br> maximum payload, so the license is not needed.<p> A few older Unimogs are already on the road in the United States, having<br> been brought from Europe by collectors. Dr. James Molloy III, a family<br> doctor in Sheridan, Ore., said he commuted 13 miles daily to his clinic in<br> his 1963 Unimog and sometimes used it to reach remote areas of national<br> forests during camping trips.<p> "I parallel-park my truck in downtown Portland and Seattle frequently,"<br> he said, adding that a Unimog seemed "a much sturdier platform than the<br> Hummer ever would be."<p><br> I heard twice on the radio newscast this morning in San Francisco<br>: that DC has announced plans for 2002 to officially bring <br>: the Unimog to the United States. It is unknown what channel they<br>: would be sold through, but most likely it would be commercial trucks.<p>: They stated a diesel only engine with turbo for all models.<br>: They also stated that there would be two lengths of chassis offered,<br>: and the long would be open bed rear, and the short would also be <br>: offered stock in such fashion, but with an optional hardtop conversion<br>: to make it more like a mega SUV. The cab would be connected apparently to this<br>: back part for seating.<p>: Anyone heard anything else on this?????<p><br><br><br><hr size=7 width=75%><p>
 

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It is a cool vehicle, and I would love one if it carried the right cab -- but it is not an SUV, it is a truck.<br><br><hr size=7 width=75%><p>
 
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