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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

Im new here and am from South Africa. I am thinking about buying a Unimog in South Africa which was used in the army here many years ago. It is a 416 troop carrier. Seems to have different cab and dropside body to what Ive seen online, and seems to be 'a South African Army Prototype' body. Anyway, what I am trying to find out is if there are any special tools or sizes I need to repair or maintain it? I did a search here and looks like there may be some 'special' tools for the engine, ie valve clearence, etc. Are all sizes metric? Will a standard tool set for normal car do it otherwise?

Specs of the Mog are OM352, 2x4 gearbox, disc brakes all round, 12.5x20 tyres, Air brakes for trailer. Doesnt seem to have the 'cascade' gearbox and cant tell yet if it has PTOs?(is that part of the normal gearbox?)

Cheers for now,
Grant
 

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BenzWorld UNIMOG statesman
Unimog 404.1 Diesel (sold :( )1995 LMTV 1078, 1995 M1079, 1079box for sale !!!
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That body looks pretty cool. My memory is something about south africa fooling around with other cab designs. For some reason I think there is someone there that makes fiberglass cabs for mogs..... but traditional.

Butt.... that being said.... That bugger your looking may well be rare. Leave that one for someone; or yourself, to restore it. Not a candidate for butchering.

Though I dont see anything wrong; not that what I think counts for anything, but nothing wrong with restoring it to work. That,s what Mogs do... work.... Much better than sitting around all restored pretty doing nothing.
 

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'75 406.121, '79 406.121 & '80 406.120 (Lake Placid)
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While there may be some special tools for some specific projects, see permanent stickie ("Must Read") post at top of forum, has a section entry on tool sharing, I'd say the answer to your question is generally no. To bring the Mog back to fighting shape, assuming nothing major wrong, all you'll need is a good set of standard tools (metric) and general mechanical knowledge (or time/interest in learning).

From my albeit limited experience, the biggest problem has been lack of use/maintenance. Obviously can't speak to the specific 416 you're considering, but this has left me to deal with problems such as replacing rubber parts, wiring, and in the extreme dealing with parts that have rusted together (had been used in high salt areas and not properly washed before being put to bed for years). Use your judgement, but if the truck generally appears to be in good shape, meaning it runs/ran when it was moved to its present location, I wouldn't be too scared.

But another warning, OEM parts are expensive, and you will see plenty of posts on this forum where people tried aftermarket imitations and were not happy. Don't overpay if the condition doesn't warrant it!

Oh, and most importantly, enjoy (if you've come this far I suspect it will end up in your driveway)!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the response so far. I am busy reading through some of the "Must reads". Not sure I will butcher it, as I would like to use it to transport my bobcat around. Saying that, it would be awesome to make it a play toy for the weekends which is what I like doing most weekends (mud and rocks). Just so many things these Mogs can do. Maybe I will restore it and use all the multi functions it can preform.
 

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'78 Mog 416.141 DoKa
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Here's a file I've had for a number of years - it includes a post by the Master Mog-man Jack Russell. It's pretty much how I made my 416's carry-around tool kit.
 

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Hi Kingdubber

In the sanction years (late 70's into 80's) SA imported the unimogs as a running chassis as MB was not allowed to sell built up trucks to SA. The body on the mog you're looking at is the bodies fitted to these chassis (for those unimogs that were not turned into Buffels) and is a body produced in SA at the time.

The majority of the mogs brought into SA were 416.162 - should give you a bit more to work on when doing internet research. The early models had the OM352 engines (125HP version), but due to sanctions, the later models were fitted with ADE352 engines, which is basically a copy of the OM352, but which was produced by Atlantis Diesel Engines outside Cape Town. Seeing that the one you're looking at has disc brakes, I would expect it to have an ADE engine. The rest of the running gear should be standard mog stuff. Most of these mogs did not have PTO boxes fitted.

I have a refurbished mog (rebuilt buffel) with a fibreglass cab (think it's mine that Coachgeo is refering?). You can find the guy who built mine on SAMOG South Africa

I'm based on joburg at the moment - I wont profess to be a mog expert, but have done a ton of reading about mogs in the last two years, especially the SA mogs, so give me a shout (send pm) if you need to talk to someone on the phone with questions.

cheers
paul
 

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U1450L DOKA
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One of the first (if not the first) mine-resistant patrol vehicles. Elevated, v-shaped hull to deflect the mine blast and move the occupants up away from the road, so the energy of the blast would dissipate a bit, enough, in most cases, to be survivable.
 

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Another early solution, to mine-finding in this case, was POOKIE. Built in Rhodesia, it was not UNIMOG based, but it used an air-cooled VW for power.
The idea was to keep it very light, so that it could traverse mines without
detonating them.

There was a lot of creative thought involved. They had a brilliant idea
regarding the tires : They gathered up used Formula 1 tires from the circuit
at Kyalami, and they were of sufficient size to reduce the ground pressure to the point where they got what they wanted.

Weird in spades, but functional.

Unimogs were in use as well, naturally
 

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Beautiful pictures. Say, The Unimog 416, at least the troop transports I'm familiar with came with a tall hydraulic jack with a saddle on top to fit the axle tube. Also, I thought the trucks had a bag with a grease gun and a test lamp for checking fuses and bulbs??? Sorry, no photos, only memories...

Rick
 

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Unimog 416.125
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Hi Rick

I see Truktor provided the Buffalo pics - thanks Truktor!

ADE didn't produce any trucks, it was merely an engine manufacturing plant that produced copies of MB engines under license. The engine they produced for the Unimogs was basically the MB OM352 with a slightly different air pump. The engines even had the MB logo stamped on all the parts and are an exact lookalike.

A tool question - I see in the tool list attachment a 17mm allen wrench is mentioned. I'm assuming this is for both the diff and gearbox drain/filler plugs?
Does anyone know if the diff and gearbox plugs are the same (i.e. would I be able to use a spare diff plug as a gearbox plug in an emergency?)

paul
 
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