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Discussion Starter #1
Lately It got to my attention that the majority of the BMW X5 and the new Mitsubishi Pajero I am seeing don't have their back tires straight .

They are in a V shape , which causes the tires to get worn from the inner sides .

I first thought it is due to the lack of maintenance in Nigeria , but it can't be because :
- Those SUV's are brand new vehicles
- Others like G Class and Land cruisers don't have this problem .
- Much older Mitsubishi Pajero's and other SUV's don't have this problem .

The only reason I could think of Is the absence of solid axles .

Am I right ? or is there another reason ?

I'll try to get a picture for one of them .

ReG ,

Shebl .
 

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Shebl - 3/16/2005 7:21 AM



They are in a V shape , which causes the tires to get worn from the inner sides .


The only reason I could think of Is the absence of solid axles .

Am I right ? or is there another reason ?

I'll try to get a picture for one of them .

ReG ,

Shebl .
It is caused by too much weight on a independent suspension that doesn't have strong enough rear springs.

I had the same problem on my Honda Odyssey minivan (independent rear suspension) until I installed AirLift springs to provide extra lift back there. No more uneven wear, and the van stays much more level. Before the AirLift springs, it always looked like it was hunkered down in the back.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
DUTCH - 3/16/2005 1:27 PM

It is caused by too much weight on a independent suspension that doesn't have strong enough rear springs.

I had the same problem on my Honda Odyssey minivan (independent rear suspension) until I installed AirLift springs to provide extra lift back there. No more uneven wear, and the van stays much more level. Before the AirLift springs, it always looked like it was hunkered down in the back.
But sometimes it is only 2 or three passengers in the Vehicles .

Or is it their own wheight is too much for the independent rear suspension ?

ReG ,

Shebl .
 

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Shebl - 3/16/2005 7:40 AM

DUTCH - 3/16/2005 1:27 PM

It is caused by too much weight on a independent suspension that doesn't have strong enough rear springs.

I had the same problem on my Honda Odyssey minivan (independent rear suspension) until I installed AirLift springs to provide extra lift back there. No more uneven wear, and the van stays much more level. Before the AirLift springs, it always looked like it was hunkered down in the back.
But sometimes it is only 2 or three passengers in the Vehicles .

Or is it their own wheight is too much for the independent rear suspension ?

ReG ,

Shebl .
The springs are designed to support the weight of the vehicle. Put some weight in there and the springs compress, which then causes the wheels to splay out at the bottom. Just one more example of the accountants controlling the design; i.e. cost savings by using inferior components.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
DUTCH - 3/16/2005 1:46 PM

The springs are designed to support the weight of the vehicle. Put some weight in there and the springs compress, which then causes the wheels to splay out at the bottom. Just one more example of the accountants controlling the design; i.e. cost savings by using inferior components.
LOL , thinking of the drivers showing off in those X5 not knowing that they have spent their $$$ for a car that looks like a running duck with the splayed wheels in the bottom LMAO [}:)]

LonG Live the Gelaendewagen , every day i see new cars the more i know what I'll be driving for the rest of my life .

ReG ,

Shebl
 

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when an independent suspension car has more weight in it than is usually expected it sags more into its suspension and you will see the wheels tilt inwards... or if the springs are wearing out.

However, it's also used as a tool for cornering performance because it changes the way the tire interacts with the road and can make for more stable cornering. Even with radio controlled offroad cars (which are virtually all independent suspension, the suspension is usually adjusted to get them to turn in a little becuase it helps with traction and stability in cornering.

The benefit to independent suspension is you can really tune how the tire hits the road for performance, but it more or less relies on the assumption that the weight of the vehicle isn't changing... which is not a very reliable assumption.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ewalberg - 3/17/2005 7:40 PM

when an independent suspension car has more weight in it than is usually expected it sags more into its suspension and you will see the wheels tilt inwards... or if the springs are wearing out.

However, it's also used as a tool for cornering performance because it changes the way the tire interacts with the road and can make for more stable cornering. Even with radio controlled offroad cars (which are virtually all independent suspension, the suspension is usually adjusted to get them to turn in a little becuase it helps with traction and stability in cornering.

The benefit to independent suspension is you can really tune how the tire hits the road for performance, but it more or less relies on the assumption that the weight of the vehicle isn't changing... which is not a very reliable assumption.
But in the case of the X5s I am seeing arround even when they are parked and no passengers inside they have their back wheels in this shape / \ and they are still new so it can not be that the springs have worned out .

I have to get my camera when I am driving .

ReG ,

Shebl
 

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that's my point...

my point is that they're tilting the tires like that intentionally to aid in cornering performance.

It can also happen when loaded or worn out, but the x5 for example, is designed intentionally like... it's part of why it's so well handling on the road. Many BMW's have a little of it... and more so than most brands. I wouldn't be too surprised if the spec'd a little toe-in on the back tires also... but that wouldn't be noticeable.
 
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