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Unimog U1200 full ag specs, CLK500
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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering about all the steps involved in importing a U406 unimog from Germany to Alberta, Canada.
In Germany many of these unimogs are registered as a farming verhicle and if I could import it as a farming vehicle, it should be relativly easy.
Wondering if anybody has done it and how I get started on this.
THANKS!!
Johannes
 

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1957 Unimog 30, 1999 E320, 2004 E320
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I can't give you much information on the importation process, but a couple things I've come to know from a friend who has imported Unimogs from Germany:

- Make sure the seller has cleaned the machine top to bottom, inside and out, get into the tiny pockets in the frame in the hard to reach corners and pull the wheels off and clear out behind the rims, you want to get everything out. Once that is complete it would also be wise to get detailed set of pictures showing it has been cleaned.

- When you are doing the import papers you'll be best to avoid mention of anything to do with farm or tractor, this seems to set off the alarms at Canada Customs and they will almost always open the container and do an inspection. If you want to avoid classifying it as a truck you might want to call it road building equipment.

- There seems to be no rhyme or reason to why Canada Customs declares a vehicle dirty and sends out for cleaning. Every time my friend has been nailed the machine still arrives in his yard covered is foreign dirt. The current theory is there are kickbacks involved here. You pay to have your container transported to a warehouse, you pay to have it unloaded, you pay to transport the machine to a wash facility, you pay for the wash and then you pay all over again for the return trip. If you end up in this position those pictures you had the seller take before loading into the container might be helpful but generally it seems you run into a brick wall when you start to question Canada Customs. They are more then happy to hold up your container while you fight with them, just remember you'll be paying warehouse fees all the while.

- As a final note, I've heard that bringing a container into Montreal will cause the most grief, if possible have it unloaded in Halifax and processed there. I heard somewhere that the port in Montreal was under investigation for questionable activities.

In closing, I'd recommend you try to find a machine in North America first before you go shopping over seas, you may get lucky and the container will fly through and will arrive on time and on budget, but if something goes wrong, it may go very wrong.

Jason
 

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63' Unimog 404 TLF-8, 08' Smart 451 Passion, 88' MB 560SEL (sold)
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I just bought a 63' 404 imported to BC in 2007. I didn't import it personally but the previous owner did. While I don't have all the details he did mention a few things about the importation process.

When the trucked landed in the port of Vancouver it was deemed to be an agricultural vehicle (even though this one was a 404 TLF-8 Fire Truck) and had to go through a short quarantine process and cleaning, I think he mentioned it was an extra $1000.00 he hadn't budgeted for.

When the ICBC (BC's provincial insurance agency) agents inspected the vehicle and registered it they issued a new VIN number and tag. They also took the original vehicle title documents and did not give them back. He had to fight on the phone for a few months to get them back and may have gotten a lawyer involved at the end?

This may not apply to yours but they also sabotaged the fire siren and lights as it was being imported as a privately owned vehicle and it wasn't being registered an an emergency vehicle.

In the end it wasn't a totally miserable experience, but it was personally more time consuming then he expected.
 

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250GD Wolf
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I have done this last year. I had my vehicle shipped from Belgium to Surrey, then I did the import to Alberta.

As the others have mentioned making sure the vehicle is clean clean clean is one of the most important parts.

I also second the other posters caution at even mentioning the word farm in any context, its not a good idea.

I would recommend A&A Custom brokers for the import side, they are familiar with the mighty Unimog and vehicle imports in general, I can flip you contact info if you wish to PM me your email address.

Its also cheaper if your getting it shipped in a Sea can (recommended) to go 1/2's with someone and get two shipped at the same time.

My truck came in as just a truck, thought its clearly a firetruck, no issues with the sirens or lights, in fact the boys at the docks asked me to turn them on so they could have a good laugh at the Euro siren :)

IMO I would import it as a vehicle, get it registered and all that jazz, it would help resale value that it can be licensed down the road should you decide to sell it.

I have a lot of info that I can send you if you want, again, just PM me your email and I'll fwd you all the stuff.

-Trev
 

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Unimog U1200 full ag specs, CLK500
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the quick responses. I have helped on some farm family immigrations to Canada and have seen these cleaning requests even for items such as bicycles and I agree they were very questionable.
I have also seen Immigration Canada destroy a horse trailer for the simple fact that it did not have any papers showing that it was qualified for canadian vehicle standards. As far as I know any vehicle requiring a registration must show that it fullfills all canadian requirements BEFORE it can enter Canada. This means you cannot correct any shortfalls when the vehicle is already in Canada. Even though we could never get the information on what was actually incorrect with the horse trailer it was destroyed for that single reason.
IF it can be imported as a farm vehicle I may have to budget for cleaning, but I am hoping I can still enjoy my unimog.
Do you have contact info from the previous owner? Maybe I can get some more details from him.
Also importing from the US or Germany should not make much of a difference or am I wrong here???
Johannes
 

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Unimog U1200 full ag specs, CLK500
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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like I may have found the important paragraph:

The Motor Vehicle Safety Act and Regulations require that all vehicles imported into Canada comply, at the time of importation, with the Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in effect on the date the vehicle was manufactured. Vehicles manufactured for sale in countries other than Canada and the United States do not comply with the requirements of the Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Act, CANNOT be altered to comply and CANNOT be imported into Canada. The only exceptions to this rule are vehicles fifteen (15) years old or older as determined by the month and year in which the vehicle was manufactured and buses manufactured before January 1, 1971.

from:
Importation of vehicles into Canada from countries other than the United States - Transport Canada

Since the U406 is older than 15 years I should be OK with the exception of the cleaning issue of course.:crybaby2:

Johannes
 

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Unimog Moderator
250GD Wolf
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If importing from anyplace other than the US, a vehicle must be 15years or older. The US I believe is 25years or older.

There are legal exceptions but I'm not familiar with them, if the vehicle is 15years old or older, it is RIV exempt, so you don't have to worry about them destroying it for not meeting RIV standards.

-Trev
 

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250GD Wolf
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Oops, we must have been typing at the same time :)

There have been Unimogs newer than 15 years legally imported from Germany to Canada and licensed for road use (1998 U2450's), but since the one your looking at is older anyway, no sense in exploring that route.
 

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1957 Unimog 30, 1999 E320, 2004 E320
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In theory it shouldn't make a difference if the vehicle came from the US or Germany but I think the biggest concern is bringing in something that isn't already in North America. It's pretty hard to keep bugs from the US from getting into Canada by virtue of the fact we are directly connect, but in the case of Europe we have an ocean that helps isolate us from one another.

I've imported a tractor, car and engine from the US and never had to worry about any sort of quarantine.

Jason
 

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250GD Wolf
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Jason,

I agree. When we went to NWMF in 2008, the Customs at the boarder asked where this "North West Mog Fest" was held, I told him it was on a private farm. He told me that if there was any mud, straw, grass, debis of any kind coming back from the US to Canada, they would either seize my vehicle for cleaning, or make me clean it before coming back. It sounded expensive just the way he said it There fairly adamant about the farm thing :D

Back onto the farm tractor thing, there may be an advantage to importing it as farm equipment into Canada, no Duty to be paid. As outlined by these documents:

May 5, 1999

CLA-2-87:RR:NC:MM:106 E81123

CATEGORY: CLASSIFICATION

TARIFF NO.: 8701.90.1060

Mr. Hans O. Mross
Mross Import Service Ltd.
23160 72nd Ave.
Langley, B.C. Canada V2Y2K2

RE: The tariff classification of Unimog U2100, U2400, U2150 and U2450 heavy duty agricultural tractors from Canada.

Dear Mr. Mross:

In your letter dated April 20, 1999 you requested a tariff classification ruling. You submitted descriptive literature for several versions of Daimler-Benz Unimog tractors.

Models U2100, U2400, U2150 and U2450 are part of the heavy-duty series of Unimog tractors that have four wheels with rubber tires. All of these models are powered by a 6-cylinder direct- injection diesel engine. Other features for each model include front and rear 3-point linkage systems, hydraulic dual-circuit disc brakes and an 8 speed spur-gear transmission. All models are rated at approximately 120 kW in PTO horsepower. All of these tractors will be used in farming and can accommodate a variety of agricultural implements such as balers, sprayers, plows and disks. The "50" suffix indicates a model with a longer wheel base.

The applicable subheading for the U2100, U2400, U2150 and U2450 Unimog tractors will be 8701.90.1060, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), which provides for other tractors suitable for agricultural use with a PTO of 119.4 kW or more but less than 134.3 kW. The rate of duty will be free.

This ruling is being issued under the provisions of Part 177 of the Customs Regulations (19 C.F.R. 177).

A copy of the ruling or the control number indicated above should be provided with the entry documents filed at the time this merchandise is imported. If you have any questions regarding the ruling, contact National Import Specialist Patrick J. Wholey at 212-637-7036.

Sincerely,

Robert B. Swierupski
Director,
And:

May 5, 1999

CLA-2-87:RR:NC:MM:106 E81124

CATEGORY: CLASSIFICATION

TARIFF NO.: 8701.90.1050

Mr. Hans O. Mross
Mross Import Service Ltd.
23160 72nd Ave.
Langley, B.C. Canada V2Y2K2

RE: The tariff classification of Unimog U1400, U1450, U1600 and U1650 medium duty agricultural tractors from Canada.

Dear Mr. Mross:

In your letter dated April 20, 1999 you requested a tariff classification ruling. You submitted descriptive literature for several versions of Daimler-Benz Unimog tractors.

Models U1400, U1450, U1600 and U1650 are part of the medium-duty series of Unimog tractors that have four wheels with rubber tires. All of these models are powered by a 6-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine. Other features for each model include front and rear 3-point linkage systems, hydraulic dual-circuit disc brakes and an 8 speed spur-gear transmission. All models are rated at approximately 100 kW in PTO horsepower. All of these tractors will be used in farming and can accommodate a variety of agricultural implements such as balers, sprayers, plows and disks. The "50" suffix indicates a model with a longer wheel base.

The applicable subheading for the U1400, U1450, U1600 and U1650 Unimog tractors will be 8701.90.1050, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), which provides for other tractors suitable for agricultural use with a PTO of 89.5 kW or more but less than 104.4 kW. The rate of duty will be free.

This ruling is being issued under the provisions of Part 177 of the Customs Regulations (19 C.F.R. 177).

A copy of the ruling or the control number indicated above should be provided with the entry documents filed at the time this merchandise is imported. If you have any questions regarding the ruling, contact National Import Specialist Patrick J. Wholey at 212-637-7036.

Sincerely,

Robert B. Swierupski
Director,
And:

May 4, 1999

CLA-2-87:RR:NC:MM:106 E81125

CATEGORY: CLASSIFICATION

TARIFF NO.: 8701.90.1035

Mr. Hans O. Mross
Mross Import Service Ltd.
23160 72nd Ave.
Langley, B.C. Canada V2Y2K2

RE: The tariff classification of Unimog U90 and U140 light duty agricultural tractors from Canada.

Dear Mr. Mross:

In your letter dated April 20, 1999 you requested a tariff classification ruling. You submitted descriptive literature for several versions of Daimler-Benz Unimog tractors.

Models U90 and U140 are part of the light-duty series of Unimog tractors that have four wheels with rubber tires. The U90 is powered by a 5-cylinder single-injection diesel engine and the U140 is powered by a 4-cylinder single-injection diesel engine. Other features for each model include front and rear 3-point linkage systems, hydraulic dual-circuit disc brakes and an 8 speed manual gearbox transmission. Both tractors are rated at approximately 51 kW in PTO horsepower. Both tractors will be used in farming and can accommodate a variety of agricultural implements such as balers, sprayers, plows and disks.

The applicable subheading for the U90 and U140 Unimog tractors will be 8701.90.1035, Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS), which provides for other tractors suitable for agricultural use with a PTO of 44.8 kW or more but less than 59.7 kW. The rate of duty will be free.

This ruling is being issued under the provisions of Part 177 of the Customs Regulations (19 C.F.R. 177).

A copy of the ruling or the control number indicated above should be provided with the entry documents filed at the time this merchandise is imported. If you have any questions regarding the ruling, contact National Import Specialist Patrick J. Wholey at 212-637-7036.

Sincerely,

Robert B. Swierupski
Director,
I haven't found anything for the U900 yet, but I'll keep searching.
 

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I believe that is the achilles heel of the situation, do you claim it as a tractor and save the duty and risk a cleaning or suck it up and pay the duty and reduce the risk.

I also know a friend of mine here in Ontario imported a 1200 as a tractor a few year back and when he went to the MTO to get plates they turned him away. His Unimog has been flagged in the system that it's a tractor and can not have plates. I think he regrets his move now.

Jason
 

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Unimog Moderator
250GD Wolf
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Yup its 12 of one and a dozen of the other, IMO I like to have my Unimog licensed so I went the import as a vehicle route, that and I don't have PTO's, 3pt, ect :)
 

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Not sure about Canada, but in the US, the tariff for a truck is higher than construction or fire equipment, though all can get you a title, and not the cleaning scrutiny an AG machine is susceptible to. Have the seller bolt a beat up hoe, loader, or dozer blade to it, get it clean, and call it construction equipment. I know of 2 trucks brought in this way with unwanted gear mounted, to save on import fees. Once in and titled, the gear was put on the block for sale.
 

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My recommendation would be to use an importer who has done this before. Yes you will pay for their experience, know how, and most importantly their prior mistakes, and most important history and connections with people.
I hate to say it but I’m sure there is a lot of professional courtesy given to someone who is reputable importer VS. some dude that shows up with something. Yes they still have a job to check everything but if the importer has a reputation of having the paper work right, container is correctly done, and has all the $ correct. It will get processed in a way that your preferring. But the average joe, who this is their first time, is going to have no pull when something is held up, and everything will be rear, reread and scrutinized. When there is a pro available let him help. Im not going to tell you who you should use, but I would imagine you can find one for a decent price and get it done right the first time. … And as a bonus you can work your day job and not worry about the small details the import is being paid to deal with.
 

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I brought my U1300L in from Belgium last year. First off, I used a RoRo ship (roll on, roll off) Cost was a little less than $3000 if I remember correctly. Yours should be cheaper because of the smaller dimensions. It came over with 2700 other cars. The unit was very clean (important). It was imported as a truck (no duty, just GST and PST later when getting plates).
I didn't use a broker (I know of another member here that used a broker, and it was a nightmare + $$). I just phoned the customs office in Halifax to confirm the steps of the whole procedure and the paperwork required, which they were very helpful with. Once I got notification from the shipping company that the truck had arrived, I phoned customs again to see if they had done their inspection and if there were any issues before I came to collect it. (Answer - Inspection done, issues none). I went and paid my GST and took the paperwork to the Autoport, where there was a $125.00 handling charge and they drove the unit up to the front door - end of story.
I forgot, between the customs office and the Autoport I stopped at the local licensing office to get a temporary travel permit so I could drive it to Ontario.
In the case of yours, you will probably be trucking it to your place, so that step won't be necessary.
Hope this helps
PM me if you need more info.
 

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- As a final note, I've heard that bringing a container into Montreal will cause the most grief, if possible have it unloaded in Halifax and processed there. I heard somewhere that the port in Montreal was under investigation for questionable activities.
LOL !

I second that !

They let my truck sit at the port for 2 weeks at 200$ a day. Halifax knows cars better than the port of Mtl

A&A custom broker was used too in my case.
 

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Unimog U1200 full ag specs, CLK500
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Discussion Starter #17
Germany to Canada

Thanks for all your help guys!
Looking for the right Unimog now...
Johannes
 

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Unimog U1200 full ag specs, CLK500
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Discussion Starter #20
U1200

After learning that the PTO output on a 406 is only rated at about 70 hp, I started looking for the newer U1200-U1700 series and have found one in the US I am interested in buying.
It's a U1200 which unfortunately is not listed on the posted papers. If you find a print with the U1200 listed that should make things at the border much easier.
It's a 82 model, so much older than 15 years...
I like to bring it in as an agricultural tractor.
Corey did an import from the US without any issues, he mentioned I must have a title and need to inform US customs 3 days prior to border crossing of the import.
Anything else?
THANKS
Johannes
 
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