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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

We finally got the 'Mog - more about that in another more social thread when I find some time.

Right now I'm wondering if you've got some quick pointer to where to look for water ingress.
I have been looking for the search button for this forum, but even as a burnt out IT guy, I'm clueless. Getting old, perhaps?

First of all, it's a "regular" ex Bundeswehr U1300L, so nothing fancy.

After a rain shower I noticed some water in the passenger side footwell. Around the light blue circle.

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This is what it looks like under the dashboard (glove box).

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As far as I can see, there's no "traces" of a waterfall.

I did notice this water-ish looking dust pattern (red arrow) on the inside of the windscreen. A bit ominous.
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The seal looks to be in decent condition, but there are a few bubbles underneath, and further to the centre of the vehicle, there's some pretty obvious deformations of the seal. There's also some obvious signs of repairs roughly sanded body filler kind of stuff. However, the seal looks better than the one on my old Defender, which looked like long eye lashes as it was so cracked.
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Before I start spraying water all over the place, do you have any tips on where to start looking?

I'm feeling a bit stressed as we've got the AV sound proofing kit arriving today and I'd like it fitted ASAP, but before fitting I want to clean up and POR15 the floor. And I really don't want to put sound deadening on top of a floor that has got water ingress. Just trying to do things the right way.

Thanks for any help! Much appreciated. Apologies for not searching, I tried.
 

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My 1300l is being painted right now just because of the windscreen rust. It can easily be worse than you think. Otherwise, the hatch can leak sometimes and of course anything else bolted to the roof. I would pull the windscreen and por-15 the frame and repair any holes. Then start sealing all the roof fittings.
 

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You need to pull the screen out. It's a common spot for rust to build. Judging from the photo you'll be lucky if you can get away without cutting and welding. It's not a difficult spot though so do it once and do it right. Treat that seam in the floor too otherwise you'll be cutting and welding there before long (ask me how I know!).
 

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I'd agree - the windshield gasket is the most likely culprit.

Then, anything on the roof that is through bolted - though those leaks should show up in stains on the headliner.

Next, the windshield wiper studs where they penetrate the cowl below the windshield.

A trick is to spread out fresh newspaper or paper towels up under the cowl / dash area. Tape the leading edge to the firewall, and let the paper form a cove down to the floor.....When the water leaks in, it will stain or deform the newspaper on the way to the floor, which might help narrow it down.

If one windshield wiper stud is leaking, fix them both, of course.

From the looks of it, you should pull your windshield no matter what. It looks like it will need a little attention.

Although this does not apply to your UNIMOG, one of the causes of floor rust, especially in winter-service trucks, is the slush that is tracked into the cab by the driver, getting in and out.

In Europe, a lot of salt is spread, and the snow / slush / salt soup is a deadly combination that stays wet and works it way under the glued-in floor mats and does its evil destruction.
 

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You have rust behind the windshield that is allowing water to bypass the windshield seal. The seal itself is not leaking. The picture from the inside is just from condensation but the picture from the outside shows the rust and once you remove the seal, you will see it goes back a way. You need to take out the windshield and you will find pin hole rust holes. This is where the water comes in. You basically have to wire brush or grind the rust and patch the holes. If the rust is really bad (based on pictures it should not be) you may need to weld in a bit of metal. I use POR-15 (there are other brands as well) paint which is moisture cured and drys hard and waterproof. It also adheres extremely well to rust. As long as the rust is not flaking or loose, then POR-15 will adhere to it and seal it from any moisture so it will not continue rusting. Before you put the windshield back in, use a blunt chisel or screw driver and punch a small dent that acts as a drain.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the replies all.

I really appreciate that most of you think that the culprit is the windscreen seal. My own experience with the Land Rover Defender says that they're quire resilient, even when frayed. However, there are repairs visible, as you can see. I'd really hate to start work on the windscreen seal seats now as I have tons of other stuff to do (like build a house on the back of it).

I'm going to do some work on it today, and I'll start by removing stuff from the dash, to investigate further and then I'll start spraying water to look for ingress. If this means I don't have to pull the windscreen and start doing welding right now then that's a win. I'd really like to do the windscreen seal properly once it is truly required (and this isn't discarding your knowledge, it's just that I have to put certain things into priority order).


My 1300l is being painted right now just because of the windscreen rust. It can easily be worse than you think. Otherwise, the hatch can leak sometimes and of course anything else bolted to the roof. I would pull the windscreen and por-15 the frame and repair any holes. Then start sealing all the roof fittings.
Yes, I'm aware of this location of rot. The Mog did have a "gun turret" or rather the machine gun fastening brackets (can't remember their designation) on the roof, I unbolted the rack, but I did seal the bolt holes with silicone before I put the bolts back. I guess a bit of water spray will show where the leak is.


You need to pull the screen out. It's a common spot for rust to build. Judging from the photo you'll be lucky if you can get away without cutting and welding. It's not a difficult spot though so do it once and do it right. Treat that seam in the floor too otherwise you'll be cutting and welding there before long (ask me how I know!).
I'm really trying to avoid pulling the screen out at the moment.
The floor will be wire brushed and treated with POR15 and then "dynamat-ish" sound dampening material, then the very thick AV sound insulation kit on top of that. Which is why I want to, at least temporarily, block any water ingress as I don't want it festering under there.


...
Then, anything on the roof that is through bolted - though those leaks should show up in stains on the headliner.

Next, the windshield wiper studs where they penetrate the cowl below the windshield.

A trick is to spread out fresh newspaper or paper towels up under the cowl / dash area. Tape the leading edge to the firewall, and let the paper form a cove down to the floor.....When the water leaks in, it will stain or deform the newspaper on the way to the floor, which might help narrow it down.

If one windshield wiper stud is leaking, fix them both, of course.

From the looks of it, you should pull your windshield no matter what. It looks like it will need a little attention.

Although this does not apply to your UNIMOG, one of the causes of floor rust, especially in winter-service trucks, is the slush that is tracked into the cab by the driver, getting in and out.

In Europe, a lot of salt is spread, and the snow / slush / salt soup is a deadly combination that stays wet and works it way under the glued-in floor mats and does its evil destruction.
Excellent points; stains in headline - I'll go have a proper look at that. Windscreen wiper studs, I'll have a look at those too. I'll get some newspapers - wait, what's those again? hahah. Seriously, I'm going to go tape some stuff to various points and then go spray some water on it (maybe it'll grow to a U1700L?)
It is an ex-German vehicle, so the salt might have been an option. The driver's side is a bit worse than the passenger side.


You have rust behind the windshield that is allowing water to bypass the windshield seal. The seal itself is not leaking. The picture from the inside is just from condensation but the picture from the outside shows the rust and once you remove the seal, you will see it goes back a way. You need to take out the windshield and you will find pin hole rust holes. This is where the water comes in. You basically have to wire brush or grind the rust and patch the holes. If the rust is really bad (based on pictures it should not be) you may need to weld in a bit of metal. I use POR-15 (there are other brands as well) paint which is moisture cured and drys hard and waterproof. It also adheres extremely well to rust. As long as the rust is not flaking or loose, then POR-15 will adhere to it and seal it from any moisture so it will not continue rusting. Before you put the windshield back in, use a blunt chisel or screw driver and punch a small dent that acts as a drain.
I don't really understand what you mean by "You have rust behind the windshield that is allowing water to bypass the windshield seal." Do you mean that there's porous material (rust) between the seal and the body, which then allows water to pass through?
I've got a tin of POR15 for the floors, so if needed I've got some of that.
If the windscreen comes out, I will do the "draindimples" trick.


Thanks again, all. I need to verify if it is indeed the windscreen seal, I'm hoping that I find something else, so that I can really take my time and to the windscreen seal properly at another time when the whirlwind has slowed down a bit.

:cool:(y)
 

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Some good advice being offered to address the cause vs farting around with the symptoms, and you will avoid a larger problem down the road. It's really not a big deal to remove the windscreen and tidy up the channel. I recently purchased a new gasket for my U1300L from MB locally and it was less than $100 taxes included (that's Canadian so about $60 USD). I have a tiny bubble at one corner of my windscreen and if it turns out to be worse than it looks when I remove the glass I'll renew the gasket for good measure and keep the old one as a spare. Playing catch up on these old trucks can feel a bit overwhelming at times and I guess we all prioritize our lists differently. For me rust is the enemy and getting it gone is job 1.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Some good advice being offered to address the cause vs farting around with the symptoms, and you will avoid a larger problem down the road. It's really not a big deal to remove the windscreen and tidy up the channel. I recently purchased a new gasket for my U1300L from MB locally and it was less than $100 taxes included (that's Canadian so about $60 USD). I have a tiny bubble at one corner of my windscreen and if it turns out to be worse than it looks when I remove the glass I'll renew the gasket for good measure and keep the old one as a spare. Playing catch up on these old trucks can feel a bit overwhelming at times and I guess we all prioritize our lists differently. For me rust is the enemy and getting it gone is job 1.
Let's just be clear here. I want to pinpoint the source of the water leak. If it's the windscreen seal, then I'll just have to do it. However, I'm not going to pull out the windscreen and start a multi-day project just because a majority internet panel is pointing at the statistically most likely source. Being in IT, I have, over two decades learnt, to actually fix the problem rather than fire off random fixes.

At the same time I don't want to come across as an askhole (someone who asks a question and ignores the answer). My initial question is whether there's something obvious to look for. Such as on the Defenders, that I'm familiar with, there's a seam in the roof, there's air vents under the windscreen and a few other sources of water, other than the windscreen seal.
In my, opinion, the windscreen seal looks "good enough" but could definitely do with a back-to-steel-and-weld-back-up job, along with a new windscreen seal.

Therefore I'm interpreting the esteemed panel's advice as; check windscreen wiper seals, check the roof, check the hatch, check the windscreen seal. Use paper/tissues/something to pinpoint the leaks, and go from there.

I'm right now going to go out there and strip the interior back as much as I need to, then I'm going to get jolly with the water hose.

Thanks guys!
 

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Let's just be clear here. I want to pinpoint the source of the water leak. If it's the windscreen seal, then I'll just have to do it. However, I'm not going to pull out the windscreen and start a multi-day project just because a majority internet panel is pointing at the statistically most likely source. Being in IT, I have, over two decades learnt, to actually fix the problem rather than fire off random fixes.

At the same time I don't want to come across as an askhole (someone who asks a question and ignores the answer). My initial question is whether there's something obvious to look for. Such as on the Defenders, that I'm familiar with, there's a seam in the roof, there's air vents under the windscreen and a few other sources of water, other than the windscreen seal.
In my, opinion, the windscreen seal looks "good enough" but could definitely do with a back-to-steel-and-weld-back-up job, along with a new windscreen seal.

Therefore I'm interpreting the esteemed panel's advice as; check windscreen wiper seals, check the roof, check the hatch, check the windscreen seal. Use paper/tissues/something to pinpoint the leaks, and go from there.

I'm right now going to go out there and strip the interior back as much as I need to, then I'm going to get jolly with the water hose.

Thanks guys!
Lol, I love the internet. Let us know what you find and how you plan to fix it. (y)
 

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The OP probably doesn't understand the design flaw. There have been prior posts on this same subject with good photos of the windshield lip. Its highly likely that your windshield lip is far worse than you think. If you remove the windshield you will see that the vertical sheetmetal below the rubber takes 90 degree turn inwards horizontally then its recessed about an inch (plus or minus) then bends up vertically to form the actual windshield lip. If the windshield was vertical it wouldn't be a problem but its not. Its tilted back. This means that the horizontal section of the lip is tilted inwards forming a gutter that continuously collects dirt and water. There is fairly large cavity around the edges formed by the seal and water that leaks in around the seal from any point around the windshield eventually runs down side of the windshield into this gutter. This water works it way up under rubber to the windshield lip and slowly rots out the windshield lip. When the lip is gone then you have whole new problem which is cutting out the rot and welding new in.

I had the same 1300L with the same leak and my seal looked better from the outside. When removed I had pinholes in that gutter on both sides of the windshield and surface rust on about 1/4 of the lower lip and missing metal on the top of the lip for about 3" on both sides of the windshield. I sanded it down, etched the rust with POR rust converter, filled the holes and then coated it with POR. I also tried to dent the lip on both corners. Newer model cabs appear to have these dents put in when they are stamped and are visible as small semicircle peeking past the rubber seal. I attempted to put in the dents with a large hammer and steel dowel but putting a dent in an outside corner is difficult. I bashed it to the point where I was worried that I might distort the windshield framing. I did not get as close to the factory dimples. I saw some of the german military field fixes and they are definitely not neat. My guess is if someone is at the point where they waiting too long and are in welding new metal that its not that hard to weld in a dimple on each side.

I do not think there is any magic goop or filler that can seal this area enough to keep water from getting on the floor. Due to the design the entire seal around the entire perimeter of the windshield would need to be sealed as other wise the partial seal job would just hold more water in and possibly if you live in cold climate things could freeze in placed they shouldn't. I expect this defect kept a few welders busy welding in new floors.
 

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I don't blame you for wanting to confirm through testing the ideas mentioned. However, the problem with the firewall rust leak is that it is not always obvious. First off your seal is probably totally fine. It's not the seal that leaks, it is the cab that rusts allowing water to come in. The part of the seal that is visible from the outside does not seal water. It is sort of like a sunroof seal. It is intened to limit water but not prevent it. Behind that lip are a series of seals that mate around the windshield frame of the cab. These are waterproof. The leak comes from the fact that the frame has rusted through behind the outside lip but in front of, or at, the other seals. There is about a 1/2 inch or more of dead space behind the exterior lip and this allows water and moisture to collect, hence the rust and then the leak. If you spray water onto the windshield and seals you may find the leak. However in a lot of cases the water has to travel a particular route or puddle in a particular place in order to start leaking. This is why it often leaks sometimes and other times doesn't. Also the rust holes are usually pin holes so the leak is very slow, sometimes you have to wait a while to even get a drip. So you may spend a lot of time looking for a leak that does not manifest itself in your test scenario so keep this in mind when doing your water test. I can't tell you with certainty exactly where your leak is but I can tell you with certainty that your are going to have to pull your windshield and fix the rust damage otherwise you will be doing this exercise often - been there done that. Pulling the windshield is actually pretty easy as is fixing the rust if they are just pinholes (which is usually the case). You can also use JB Weld or do mutli coats of thick POR to fix pinholes after the metal has been cleaned up properly. The biggest challenge is getting it back in which usually takes two people and a bit of patience. It's just a standard rope pull installation though. Otherwise have a windshield person come to you house and put it back in. The whole thing is really just a few hours of work but you have to wait for the POR to dry.
 

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Diagnosis you leak all you want, but that doesn’t negate the fact that you have a significant problem at the windscreen. I took the exact same approach as you and suffered the consequences. I thought I could just maintain it and do it later. Now I have holes that are requiring repair.
There is no amount of stock interior that needs to come out to diagnose a water leak, these things don’t leak but from a couple of places.
Oh, and many of us here can from Land Rovers. I specifically designed and supplied after market parts for the Defender. The windscreen and it’s corrosion issues on the Defender are not on par with the SBU windscreen.
Do it now, do it later but you will wish you had just done it and gotten it over with. The whole process can easily take less than a few hours if the windscreen frame is not bad and you are capable of light body work. Heck, if it’s just pin holes then welding won’t be required. Just some body filler and a bit of diligent sanding will solve the problem.
 

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Let's just be clear here. I want to pinpoint the source of the water leak. ................



Therefore I'm interpreting the esteemed panel's advice as; check windscreen wiper seals, check the roof, check the hatch, check the windscreen seal. Use paper/tissues/something to pinpoint the leaks, and go from there.

I'm right now going to go out there and strip the interior back as much as I need to, then I'm going to get jolly with the water hose.

Thanks guys!
As a builder, I have dealt with leaks and water damage for many decades now. When faced with figuring out water entry point in a structure (I have regularly been called on to figure out other people's screwups), water testing is often the technology of choice, but one must have a method. It is rarely useful to just get out the hose and start spraying. I get out the hose, and let it run on the lowest possible entry point, possibly for quite a long time (15-60 minutes?), then move up in increments, all the while watching for intrusion on the interior surface. If you see old signs of water on the firewall/mats etc, it is not really likely that you need to remove things like mats in order to find the entry point; the water is dripping ONTO those surfaces. Having said that, wicking / capillary action is a significant issue, and water can and does move sideways and even uphill, under the right circumstances.

The tricky issue in water testing is wind effects: deflecting things, opening up cracks, as well as "pushing" water more strenuously into places that it would not go under static conditions. This is obviously a concern with a vehicle, even one as speed challenged as a MOG. If you really want to test first, by all means do so, and if you are methodical you will quite likely be able to differentiate between problem and non-problem areas (like wiper or firewall other thru-holes). Might open the hood, and start testing low on the firewall first. If you really want to know if the roof is the source of the leaks, you will have to mask off the windshield area with plastic and tape, and run the hose topside when all below is dry (assuming you got it wet on earlier testing). Isolating possible entry points is key, if you want to do this at all meaningfully. Up to you, of course, but pulling the glass is still probably the most cost-beneficial, time-wise.

Our current "best practice" for (vertical) window installs is to use synthetic wrap on all sides of the frame, and seal the window unit to that wrap. The critical part is that we build a waterproof drain pan interior to the framing sill (with a dam on the interior edge), and leave a small weep hole open near each bottom exterior corner, directing water back out over the building wrap. Water can and will get past even the best window units available, and there must be a way to capture and re-direct it harmlessly back outside. For slope glazing (you'd call them skylights), it is imperative to use a mounting system framework that incorporates a complete set of drainage channels on the interior side, capturing and re-directing the water down to the bottom edge, and then out weep holes. Admittedly, a house is even more speed-impaired than a MOG, but one should start to sense a pattern here. Feel free to draw your own conclusions.

Only time water test failed me was on a large slope glazed assembly. It had a strange tiny leak, that ultimately was solved by additional sealing at the top edge of the glass panels. Accompanying strong winds were pushing the rain water up the slope, and also deflecting the glass enough to open up a hairline gap under the gasketed glass clamps/ cover pieces. We solved the problem, by deduction, application, and an experiment (wait for next similar weather event), which worked. Go figure.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Right. :rolleyes:
I know how the SBU windscreen is fitted. I've read up on this, I've even asked, and kindly been provided with instructions on doing the dimples.
I also know that the bottom edge on our windscreen is less than perfect.
I also know that it will not get better and heal over time. It will need addressing.
I asked where to look. I am aware of the intricacies of glass-rubber-metal and how it rots away.
What I am not aware of, as a less than 1 month Unimog owner, is the other stuff. The stuff that's particular to a Unimog SBU. If there was a thing that fails often, I could have looked at that first.

Anyway, stripped out the glove box, and the vent-trim on the inside of the windscreen, and various other things. Started watering the ol' gal from bottom to top. Running in to check for drips all over the place (this is good exercise if you don't want to go to the gym). I kept watering, running, watering, running, watering, checking, bending, poking, wiping, watering, etc, etc. After about 1h I started getting frustrated as she was as dry inside as a lady I once knew. I was just about to give up and I started noticing a drip that seemed out of place. Didn't think much of it, but wiped it and kept watering.
Drip came back, thought it came from the drip-rail on the top of the door.
Nothing on the floor.
Just about to give up.
Then I noticed something out of place...

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There it was..!

Which is here... to be more precise...

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With a bit more context,... it's here:
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Which means I've spent the afternoon and evening pulling off the door cards, finding a moisture seal (the plastic thingy that's sealing the holes in the door). And whilst I was there, I've put in a bit more dynamat-ish stuff and drenched the, surprisingly healthy, inside of the door in Dinitrol.
I've put it back together with the means I had on hand, but will order a new moisture plastic thingy and fit that. At some point we'll probably end up with a custom door card, and painting the inside of the door.

I'm pleased I can get on with cleaning up the floor, POR15'ing the floor, fitting dynamat-ish stuff and the finally the AV rubber mat kit.

Thanks for all your input on the windscreen seal. :cool:(y)(y)
 

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Congratulations on finding the leak in the right side door.

I'm a bit skeptical that you solved the whole problem.

I hope you did, but looking at your latest photos, I wonder.

The water emerges from the lower edge of the door insert panel, passes just aft of the rear Winkerkelle mount, then it hugs the sheetmetal all of the way down, and apparently wraps to the underside of the door, where it would encounter the lower part of the weatherstrip .

There is one drop shown hovering on the edge, below the door panel, and it may, in fact, have dropped off of the door at that point. The tracks of previous drops, however, show that some of them (most?) don't leave the door, and continue on down the various contours until they reach the bottom. Opening the door for the photo might have upset things a bit, but there is a clear track to the bottom of the door.

Once the drops hit the bottom and encounter the weatherstrip, I don't think they are likely to 'climb back up' to the floor level. If they did reach the floor, or enough drops did bail out off of that corner below the insert panel, then the floor would get a little wet....But I don't see the water making it to your original Blue Circle, if the truck was parked on level ground. That is something I don't know. The amount of water inside the circle is also unknown - could a few drops from the door account for the total ?

The general slope of the passenger floor is from the firewall back and out towards the door. The door bottoms, as you know, are out in the breeze, in the unique UNIMOG fashion, so the weatherstrip would collect the water. From the rear part of the door bottom to the circle is a little unlikely, unless the truck was parked nose down. It may have been, which would explain the situation.

Anyway, good work, but I would not be surprised if the circled area gets wet again.
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Now, to approach the dead horse with a bat...

I'd suggest pulling the windscreen anyway, and sooner rather than later.

Why ?

1. There is most likely an issue brewing there, and it is more than likely worse than it looks from the outside.

2.'Rust Never Sleeps', nor does it stop on its own, so your windshield will need to be addressed sooner or later, and the sooner it is opened up and surveyed, the less time there is for the damage to increase.

3. Once repaired and re-sealed (and then monitored), your truck build can proceed with the good feeling that the chronic problem of the rusty windshield frame has been addressed.

4.If we are all wrong and there is nothing but pristine sheetmetal under that gasket, then no problem. We all learn something, and you are lucky and have bucked the odds. That would also be good, and you could proceed with your build knowing that the windshield seal is under control.
 

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All that said, not every UNIMOG has a rust issue around the windshield pinch weld. Some show no rust, and some show very little, after service in Europe, when the cabs have been refurbished or stripped for salvage.
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Discussion Starter #17
Truktor, as usual you're providing some very interesting points. Thank you. I really appreciate it.

I agree with you that I might not have solved the problem. Even if I have, it's only temporarily because of the nature of time, rust, rubber seal decay, and all that. I'm not expecting to use the truck for 50 years and it still being waterproof.

I'm a little bit unsure of where you think the water is coming from though? Regardless, I will keep a very keen eye on things, and we're expecting thunderstorms on Sunday, so I might find myself checking the cab out on several occasions.

However, what this research has done is given me confidence that a) the windscreen seal is not leaking, and b) I can proceed with installing the sound deadening stuff, c) there's no hidden rot inside the cab.

And whilst everyone keeps on harping on about pulling the windscreen and fixing the seal. Can we stop that? I get it. I've said it over and over again. I get it!

There are things that are not suitable for sharing on a public forum, and right now is not the time for me to work on the windscreen seal. It's waterproof, and I have confidence that a) I can access it when needed and b) it's not a gigantic work to undertake. (I'm in general extremely impressed and pleased to see the "bolt on" and "modular" approach to the very basic cab - it gives me confidence to continuously improve).

I'm also under no illusion that things will improve over time. I'll be monitoring the cab for rust and water ingenstion issues continuously. Which is one of the reason why I'm a) removing loose rust, b) applying POR15, and c) making the rubber floor mats removable for inspection.

With regards to you analysis of the positioning of the truck and all that; It's not being driven, so the water has entered from rain in it's current position. It is not totally level, and it leans towards the drivers side a little bit (I've not put a spirit level on it). Front-to-back it's pretty level. However, there was a very thin floor mat on the floor, and through capillary effect, I believe that a little bit of water will flow out to a larger area. I also can't recall if we moved the floor mat around before discovering the water (thus further moving the water around). I also don't know how long it was since the rain and how much of it had evaporated.

For all it's worth I appreciate all the good sentiments, but in hindsight I should never have posted about this.

Thanks all!
 

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Points well taken.
After all , you have the truck to hose down and test and the rest of us do not.
Looking forward to your progress and further posts on your truck.
Welcome to the fray.

It is possible to pry open the windshield gasket and have a look, and even apply some
Rust Stop potion without removing the glass. I used 3-4 plastic putty knives about 1.5" in width, and working from the outside, I wedged the blades in and pried the lip up, holding the putty knives in place with wooden blocks. This allowed me to have a look, do some scraping, and flood in some rust neutralizer to a couple of the problem areas.....
just in case it ever comes up.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
We had a thorough look yesterday after rainfall most of the night and it was all dry. It's rained again this night, so when I go out to finish off the Silent Coat (dynamat-ish) stuff, today, the first thing I'll do is to check for water ingress. Regardless, I'll keep a good eye on it all as long as it's in our custody.

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I'm glad you fixed the leak, it stayed dry, and you are moving on. My drip analysis was all wet, it seems.

Your sound insulation jobs looks great, and thanks for posting photos.

This forum has seemed to have slackened a bit, and it is good to have new information posted.

Plus, I can add your photo to the 'Sound Insulation' file, and those collected photos might help somebody down the road.
 
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