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1983 240D
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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a 1983 240D that has been sitting.

Tranny seems solid- no slipping, just acts like the controls are off. Goes into gear kind of hared and sometimes can't make up it's mind when to downshift. No particles or debris in the fluid.

So I followed the thin black vaccuum line that goes from the throttle linkage to the rear of the tranny.

The fitting is all covered in soot from an exhaust leak that has been handled. But I could spin it with my fingers, it was kind of loose.

I am soaking it with degreaser right now, I was just hoping someone could describe how it is supposed to be connected.

Also, is it ok to have a little play on the shaft between the interior gear selector and the control lever on the tranny?

Any thing else to check?

Many thanks if anyone can help.
 

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1979 280CE
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6,118 Posts
If the fitting is loose then you just found a vacuum leak. If there is play in the gear shift that means that you need new shifter bushings.
 

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W-1-2-3 Go!
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Play between the shifter is not right, you'll need two bushings to replace those from inside the car, and another two from underneath. Really cheap ones, the two inside ones are easy to replace. Doing so also allows the third bushing to be replaced from inside (thereby leaving just one more bushing to be replaced from underneath).

Might as well remove the vacuum lines (plastic) and degrease each one of them, and install the inline filters available for $4 each at the local dealer.
 

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1979 280CE
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6,118 Posts
Karugs, why would you remove all the plastic vacuum lines?
 

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1983 240D
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27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
vaccuum hose sealed- pics

thanks for the tips all

I posted when I started the job and I just got back. I am a total novice mechanic so at least you all confirmed that I was starting on the right track.

As you can see in the photos, the o-ring inside the fitting had failed. On inspection it was loose so I could easily move it with my fingers. Also oil and debris had gone past it.

I took it off and fished it out- that is why you see rope. I blew it out with a compressor from the throttle end.

Getting a new o-ring was tricky- had to buy a few and make a few trips to the parts store. They were either to small to seal or too big to put the fitting back on. Finally got on on there good and the fitting is not loose anymore.

On the test drive found it is shifing much better. It used to be the only smooth shifts were at high RPM's, now about 70% of the shifts are smooth. I am guessing this car used to shift 100% smooth- right? So I would say this repair is successful- cost less than $2.:)

Where is a good place to get the bushings for the lever controls you are talking about?

And neat idea regarding the inline filter. Never heard of that before. I will get one because it will be easy to put in there.

p.s. What is a bowden cable? I am totally a novice and never had Mercedes before.
 

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babyhauler said:
t
And neat idea regarding the inline filter. Never heard of that before. I will get one because it will be easy to put in there.

p.s. What is a bowden cable? I am totally a novice and never had Mercedes before.
They actually installed a factory see through fuel filter in the EGR valve vacuum line on my '85 300D. At first I did not understand what a fuel filter was doing in the vacuum line.

The Bowden cable is the cable with a plastic threaded fitting on top of the valve cover. You adjust this cable to change the transmission shift points (engine RPM). Turning out the white plastic threaded fitting will cause the transmission to shift at higher RPMs.
 

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1979 280CE
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I still would like to know why you need any type of filter in a vacuum line
 

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1983 240D
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Discussion Starter #10
is this the Bowden line? -pic

p100 said:
The Bowden cable is the cable with a plastic threaded fitting on top of the valve cover. You adjust this cable to change the transmission shift points (engine RPM). Turning out the white plastic threaded fitting will cause the transmission to shift at higher RPMs.
My last question for the thread-

I included a photo of my only Bowden line outlined in red. It is my idle adjuster and I have a knob to adjust it by my headlight switch.

I just want to be clear- are you saying I can adjust my shift points by adjusting the cable settings?
 

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79Mercy said:
I still would like to know why you need any type of filter in a vacuum line
If you install one of the clear filters in the line going to to the injection pump fuel shutoff valve, if the valve ever fails, it will be easily visible, and will prevent the engine oil from getting sucked into the rest of the vacuum system.

Jamie
 
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