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1986 435 U1300L Krankenwagen
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Discussion Starter #1
Is it worth fitting grease nipples/zerks in the torque ball casings? And is it worth putting drain plugs in the torque tubes? I've seen both mods done but not sure of the value in doing it.
 

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1976 406 w/ backhoe and dozer blade, a small collection of implements too
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1,404 Posts
I'm not familiar with the torque ball casing term. Is that the fitting the torque tube terminates in on the transmission? If so, mine (a 406) has zerk fittings and the manual says not to wind too much grease in there "less than five pumps" if I recall correctly. Having taken mine apart before, any extra grease would go down the torque tube and really not be a big deal. The bushing is plastic so really could use the grease.

Putting a drain on the bottom of the torque tube would be a good idea in my mind as you could check and see if your output seal is leaking and drain any moisture out if any gets in there. Jason Couch has done this a number of times as I recall.

Oddly, my 1975 406 Bagger has a vent on the top of the torque tube but my friends 1975 Bagger does not. Go figure.
 

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1986 435 U1300L Krankenwagen
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58 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I'm not familiar with the torque ball casing term. Is that the fitting the torque tube terminates in on the transmission? If so, mine (a 406) has zerk fittings and the manual says not to wind too much grease in there "less than five pumps" if I recall correctly. Having taken mine apart before, any extra grease would go down the torque tube and really not be a big deal. The bushing is plastic so really could use the grease.

Putting a drain on the bottom of the torque tube would be a good idea in my mind as you could check and see if your output seal is leaking and drain any moisture out if any gets in there. Jason Couch has done this a number of times as I recall.

Oddly, my 1975 406 Bagger has a vent on the top of the torque tube but my friends 1975 Bagger does not. Go figure.
Yes, that's it exactly. Mine's a 435 and the manual only requires that you coat the shell halves with assembly paste before install. I don't know when mine was last apart but the nylon shells were well greased but with a yellow grease and not moly - as I was expecting.
 

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1987 Unimog SEE
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80 Posts
You want to avoid molybdenum grease with most plastics as there is an incompatibility issue. I believe the sulfur in molybdenum disulfide will weaken plastics. Lithium based greases tend to be better.
 

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1986 435 U1300L Krankenwagen
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Discussion Starter #5
You want to avoid molybdenum grease with most plastics as there is an incompatibility issue. I believe the sulfur in molybdenum disulfide will weaken plastics. Lithium based greases tend to be better.
That's interesting because it's exactly what the manual calls for. It states that a molydenum disulphide running in paste should be used. I tried to find the MB approved grease without luck though the manual says any commercially available paste can be used so I've ordered Rocol Dry Moly Paste. I'll have to look into it further to make sure it's compatible with the plastic shells...unless anyone else can shed any light?
 

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1987 Unimog SEE
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I was incorrect. It turns out the key part of my statement was “most” . I talked again to the chemical engineer at my work and he said nylon(which I assume the bushing to be made from) is pretty chemically robust and likely won’t have a bad reaction. Other plastics like ABS, will. What he suggested was wiping a part with Acetone. If it glazes, it is chemically sensitive and moly grease should be avoided. There are charts online from various sources for grease compatibility with plastics.
 
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