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Following last spring's "Rolling Restoration" with thousands of miles logged, I have begun to dig in to the minor annoyances that distract from Pure 107 Enjoyment.

Such as, when I slammed the driver's door (one does not "close" the door of a 107. One "slams" it regardless of the force applied. A friend of mine once remarked that a 107 door would be an effective enhanced interrogation prop. . . the mere prospect of having one's hand shut in it would cause State Secrets to roll like water. . . ) there were a series of follow-on "clunks" from the door, even though it was shut!

Now I may be new to the 107 chassis, but I have it on reliable authority, that when you close the door and hear a "thud," that is the only thud you should hear.

But I was not hearing that, I was hearing something that sounded like a high-speed foul ball bouncing off the plastic seats at Yankee Stadium.

Anyway you get the idea.

So into the door I went, like Howard Carter opening the Tomb of Tutankhamen.

Entering the door is as described in about (ten) pages of the workshop manual. The little screws that hold the chrome end pieces on are removed, the chrome pieces come off, the latch end piece slides DOWN and away, and pretty soon, the door panel is free.

Except that there are TWO screws holding the panel on. One is concealed behind a flimsy plastic chrome-plated trapezoid between the lock and latch levers, and the other goes through the forward end of the arm rest, into a captive U-nut contained in the door shell. And of course there are a few white plastic clips around the perimeter.

Once I got the panel off I noticed a few things;

1) No plastic membrane separating cardboard panel from door shell. This was probably discarded by a prior body shop decades ago.

2) Gears, sliders, tracks all drier than the Gobi Desert. What remained of the grease was al dente.

3) Random bits found in bottom of door. These were unquestionably the source of the multiple impact noises.

4) Arm rest/door pull screw was a slot-head, not a phillips (factory) and threaded through a u-nut that somebody had GAS welded (with brass rod) into the door shell. So not only was this a ham-fisted repair, it was a DECADES OLD ham-fisted repair. These will replaced with original parts if I can get EPC to cooperate.

Despite all this, the door shell was rust free, and all the drains were open, a big plus.

In a Kent Bergsma moment, I cleaned the old congealed grease from the tracks, rails and gears, and reapplied the only grease I had around, some Lubro Moly CV joint grease in the 100cc tube. I'm sure Kent recommends something else, but I'll get to that the next time I'm in the door, which will be in about a week.

In the mean time, what are these random items? I know what the white plastic thing is, it's a pin to hold the door panel to the shell.

What is this big lead thing?

And the plastic track?

I took the opportunity to remove the two large philips screws and pull the handle off, this was very simple, and lubricate the springs. For this I use Wuerth HHK in the spray can. This is a sticky lubricant that won't wash off and stands up to high pressures. It's probably not suitable for window tracks though, as it would tend to bind things up.

Looks like the rear door handle clip where it mounts to the panel has torn the cardboard. Has anyone had success repairing the cardboard? Is a new panel available in the aftermarket? This makes the handle very sloppy.

More to come once I identify the part numbers of the missing or buggered screws!

Stay tuned
 

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That thing that looks like a piece of lead is the front window guide. They are not replaceable. You need to get a new window. Or you can glue them back on like I did. I just cleaned them out good and glued them in with two 0.030" aluminum shims and epoxy.

The rubber thing is the front seal where the window seals against the mirror. of it may be that piece of plastic at the lower front of the window see picture.
 

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Mystery door bits

Following last spring's "Rolling Restoration" with thousands of miles logged, I have begun to dig in to the minor annoyances that distract from Pure 107 Enjoyment.

Such as, when I slammed the driver's door (one does not "close" the door of a 107. One "slams" it regardless of the force applied. A friend of mine once remarked that a 107 door would be an effective enhanced interrogation prop. . . the mere prospect of having one's hand shut in it would cause State Secrets to roll like water. . . ) there were a series of follow-on "clunks" from the door, even though it was shut!

Now I may be new to the 107 chassis, but I have it on reliable authority, that when you close the door and hear a "thud," that is the only thud you should hear.

But I was not hearing that, I was hearing something that sounded like a high-speed foul ball bouncing off the plastic seats at Yankee Stadium.

Anyway you get the idea.

So into the door I went, like Howard Carter opening the Tomb of Tutankhamen.

Entering the door is as described in about (ten) pages of the workshop manual. The little screws that hold the chrome end pieces on are removed, the chrome pieces come off, the latch end piece slides DOWN and away, and pretty soon, the door panel is free.

Except that there are TWO screws holding the panel on. One is concealed behind a flimsy plastic chrome-plated trapezoid between the lock and latch levers, and the other goes through the forward end of the arm rest, into a captive U-nut contained in the door shell. And of course there are a few white plastic clips around the perimeter.

Once I got the panel off I noticed a few things;

1) No plastic membrane separating cardboard panel from door shell. This was probably discarded by a prior body shop decades ago.

2) Gears, sliders, tracks all drier than the Gobi Desert. What remained of the grease was al dente.

3) Random bits found in bottom of door. These were unquestionably the source of the multiple impact noises.

4) Arm rest/door pull screw was a slot-head, not a phillips (factory) and threaded through a u-nut that somebody had GAS welded (with brass rod) into the door shell. So not only was this a ham-fisted repair, it was a DECADES OLD ham-fisted repair. These will replaced with original parts if I can get EPC to cooperate.

Despite all this, the door shell was rust free, and all the drains were open, a big plus.

In a Kent Bergsma moment, I cleaned the old congealed grease from the tracks, rails and gears, and reapplied the only grease I had around, some Lubro Moly CV joint grease in the 100cc tube. I'm sure Kent recommends something else, but I'll get to that the next time I'm in the door, which will be in about a week.

In the mean time, what are these random items? I know what the white plastic thing is, it's a pin to hold the door panel to the shell.

What is this big lead thing?

And the plastic track?

I took the opportunity to remove the two large philips screws and pull the handle off, this was very simple, and lubricate the springs. For this I use Wuerth HHK in the spray can. This is a sticky lubricant that won't wash off and stands up to high pressures. It's probably not suitable for window tracks though, as it would tend to bind things up.

Looks like the rear door handle clip where it mounts to the panel has torn the cardboard. Has anyone had success repairing the cardboard? Is a new panel available in the aftermarket? This makes the handle very sloppy.

More to come once I identify the part numbers of the missing or buggered screws!

Stay tuned
Firstly, the part on the right side in pic 1 looks a lot like like the small rubber grommet that fits at the top of the door at the back (on the body- not the door). It looks like a seven.

Secondly, The other small block shaped piece looks like a rear guide block. They are only press fitted to the glass and often drop off in their old age. I had to glue mine to the glass with a silicone sealant. You s/be able to see if it's missing. If so that would account for a lot of rattling between the glass and the guide rail. I notice that the small adjusting screw is missing from the block. Note that the screw should only be tightened enough to allow easy sliding on the rail

Thirdly, The after market door cards are often crap and one I bought was not drilled and actually broke in transit.. The original was totally stuffed on one door (moron body shop) and I replaced it by making a new one out of high grade 3mm 5ply plywood. It's a tricky job compounded by the fact that all the holes for clips are NOT equidistant apart and the bottom row of holes for the clips is not parallel to the top ones.
I would think if it's only a small bit needing replacing you could patch it and save a lot of trouble. If you do replace the door card I would replace all the 5 different varieties of clips and when to are drilling holes in the card, use a very thin drill first to ensure the proper location with the holes in the door. I'm not sure if your car has the same black alloy bit at the top of the door but if it does, note that you need to be careful bending the little tabs to remove it as you need to bend them back the other way to hold onto the door card.

I hope this is of some use.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Epilogue (sorta)

I got the door buttoned up-- fixed the rear handle by using a piece of steel about 1.5" x 3" as backing plate- this was thin enough to fix the handle, but not thick enough to bulge out the door panel. Was not successful attaching the rear slide, this will require window removal at another time.

I put a piece of Dynamat on the opening to sort of block the water and such. It does absolutely nothing for the sound.
 

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