Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi I have a W212 Black car (I believe its 040), I like to detail my cars myself and I would appreciate any suggestions on products and how to best approach waxing a black car to avoid swirls, etc. I hand wax (don't have a machine unless you believe I should acquire one).

Thanks,

FTB

PS I read somewhere there are waxes that are better for Black/dark color cars than others?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I use Meguiar's Carnauba Cleaner Wax paste, which has a very mild abrasive in it, followed by Meguiar's Gold Class Carnauba Plus Wax paste. All by hand, don't worry about machine waxing. To avoid swirls, wash the car well first then clay bar before you apply the wax.

Here is a black car I did last weekend for one of my customers:




 

·
Registered
Several MB's
Joined
·
352 Posts
Hi I have a W212 Black car (I believe its 040), I like to detail my cars myself and I would appreciate any suggestions on products and how to best approach waxing a black car to avoid swirls, etc. I hand wax (don't have a machine unless you believe I should acquire one).

Thanks,

FTB

PS I read somewhere there are waxes that are better for Black/dark color cars than others?
If your car is a daily driver you are going to ultimately end up getting swirls. The most important thing to do is to wash it properly since this is where the majority of defects are induced. At a minimum you should use the two bucket method; one bucket for your shampoo and another with clean water in it to rinse your wash mitt, sponge,etc. Personally I use a grout sponge that you can buy sat Home Depot or Lowes. You wash one panel at a time starting at the top, rinse the wash mitt/ sponge in the clean bucket and continue until the entire car is washed and rinsed.
I find the best way to dry the car is with a micro fiber waffle weave towel(s). It will give you the best drying with the fewest swirls. Unfortunately swirls and scratches will show up even with this type of care. I use a random orbital buffer made by Flex with the Menzerna line of polishes to polish out defects. I have used number of carnuba waxes and various sealants over the years and have found that Blackfire Wet Diamond sealant is by far the best that I have EVER used.
I can write this from experience since I continually slave over an SL55 and a CL55 both being black. I fully support the saying that "Black is not a color,it's a part time job". Good luck and as someone recommended go to www.autopia.org for numerous discussions on this subject.
 

·
Registered
2005 230 Kompressor
Joined
·
341 Posts
Some All-In-One cleaners have both cleaning and filling capabilities respond well to MB paints. Waxes and sealants are the LSP's (Last Step Protection) and that is what protects the paint and gives shine and gloss.

But as stated above, prep is the key to a good finish, especially for black. Everything from proper washing, to drying correctly, to using any polish to correct the finish, play a major role in how the car looks in the end when wax/sealant is applied. A good shine will either show off your great "smooth as glass surface", or highlight all of the defects and mistakes. To avoid the micro-marring and scratches that are amplified on a black finish, pay careful attention to the prep before you wax/seal. Also black is much more user-friendly to work with when cool and out of the sun.

MB paint is very hard and durable, but if you don't treat it right it can be a pain to restore and maintain. There are a number of good products that you can apply by hand for great results.

My MB has black paint and a good sealant such as Blackfire, or wax products like Meguiar's mentioned above are good choices, and there are tons more.

I have used Autoglym SRP and topped with Extra Gloss for a great cleaning, filling and protecting combo on my car, and am now using, and really liking, the Hydro Product line for black as well. Really fills well and is easy on/off. My neighbor loves his Klasse products for his black MB. Tons of great products to choose from, so shop around and try a few to see what works for you.

Sealants tend to offer better durability and protection but some people prefer the look of a good carnuba wax, so the choice is individual.
 

·
Registered
2000 and 2003 W220 S500
Joined
·
930 Posts
My best tip is to use as little wax as possible to cover the area.

I've found that using just enough to make as thin a coat as possible really cuts down on the stuff getting in to the crack and crevices.

I'm talking about using a 1/4" dot of wax to cover at least 6"x6" area.

This really helps me out during the buffing, since there is less product to get off and I use less toothpicks to clean the cracks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
2 coats of thin wax application is even better.

Make it 1 hour apart and make sure the wax is completely dry before removing the residue.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
W124
Joined
·
4,759 Posts
my $0.02

Don't ever ever ever dry your car with a towel or chamois or anything that was developed before the leaf blower. Seriously.

And take a look at a new product Turtle wax has out. Its a "black-only" wax system. All the products in the box are actually black (use gloves) and leave black residue behind (better to have black residue in paint chips than white right? So far my 040 500e is still beading water after two months outside in the elements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
I'll add that we make some great one-step products which include our FX SynWax and our California Gold Carnauba Cleaner Wax (both are available in liquid or paste). Also in our California Gold line, we have a three-step system of Pre-Wax Cleaner, Sealer & Glaze and Pure Carnauba Wax (liquid or paste).

If you want a one step that's super easy to use, I'd recommend our FX SynWax paste. It offers glazing properties to help fill the spiderwebbing you're seeing, it won't chalk, and you can apply it in the sun with no worry of it drying hard before you're ready to remove it.

As mentioned above, with most any product out there, a thin coat is all you need; anything more is a waste of effort and money. Two coats if you like.

But contrary to the "1 hour apart" mentioned above, this is not necessarily true with all products, so read the directions. Our products can be done immediately after one another, and the "dry to a haze" time should be no longer than it takes to wipe clear with a gentle swipe of your finger -- any longer and you're going to create more work, at least with our California Gold line and other products out there with traditional polishes.

The two-bucket wash method is highly recommended and use a good natural lambswool/sheepskin wash mitt for the body and a microfiber mitt for the lower panels and wheels.

If you do use microfiber towels, try laying it on the surface where you can, and gently "pat" it dry. Try a spray wax like our FX Spray Wax if you do buff it dry.

Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
2002 CLK 430 Convt. '91 420 SEL, '80 240D, '93 190E Sportline, '70 300 SEL 6.3
Joined
·
1,555 Posts

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks again guys, I put the Mothers California Gold Carnauba Cleaner Wax on my Porsche (red) 2 weekends ago that worked great, easy, fast and a good shine. I just ordered the Blackfire products, seems like just in time because it looks like the rainy season is coming in early.

FTB

Appreciate the tips on the two buckets and the leaf blower!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
I use a Griots Garage random orbital buffer with Machine Polish III. This works very well for me getting the swirls out of the clearcoat/paint. I purchased their starter kit ($200) and received their clay bar along with Best of Show Wax.
I have yet to use their clay bar (I have another one that I am trying to finish off) however, the buffer is a must have for any fanatical individual such as myself. The Griots buffer doesn't burn through the paint, and stops when pushed too hard against the paint surface. I highly recommend it for a beginner, as it is about the safest buffer on the market.
Removing the swirls is time consuming, but once you have them removed and the car waxed, they shouldn't come back for awhile (under the assumption that you are very careful when washing/drying your car).
I actually use a leaf blower to remove the water from my car after washing. I have found that alot of Porsche owners use this "technique." It really is great because it isn't abrasive, and you can remove the excess water with a fine microfiber. It takes me about four hours to wash my car and another few days to polish/wax it.
Griots also has a system for waxing where you apply one coat with the buffer, let it sit for three hours, and then apply a second coat without removing the first coat. You let the second coat sit for another three hours before applying a third coat which you let sit overnight. You then remove the third coat, and this apparently isn't as difficult as one may think. I can't be conclusive, as I am still in the process of waxing my car.

If you would rather hide the swirls by hand, Zymol Cleaner Wax will "hide" some of the swirls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I use a Griots Garage random orbital buffer with Machine Polish III. This works very well for me getting the swirls out of the clearcoat/paint. I purchased their starter kit ($200) and received their clay bar along with Best of Show Wax.
I have yet to use their clay bar (I have another one that I am trying to finish off) however, the buffer is a must have for any fanatical individual such as myself. The Griots buffer doesn't burn through the paint, and stops when pushed too hard against the paint surface. I highly recommend it for a beginner, as it is about the safest buffer on the market.
Removing the swirls is time consuming, but once you have them removed and the car waxed, they shouldn't come back for awhile (under the assumption that you are very careful when washing/drying your car).
I actually use a leaf blower to remove the water from my car after washing. I have found that alot of Porsche owners use this "technique." It really is great because it isn't abrasive, and you can remove the excess water with a fine microfiber. It takes me about four hours to wash my car and another few days to polish/wax it.
Griots also has a system for waxing where you apply one coat with the buffer, let it sit for three hours, and then apply a second coat without removing the first coat. You let the second coat sit for another three hours before applying a third coat which you let sit overnight. You then remove the third coat, and this apparently isn't as difficult as one may think. I can't be conclusive, as I am still in the process of waxing my car.

If you would rather hide the swirls by hand, Zymol Cleaner Wax will "hide" some of the swirls.
Thanks I'll put Griot buffer on my Christmas list!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
In reference to the Turtle Wax Black Box product mentioned a few posts above:

I'll start out by saying that I've never been a huge fan of Turtle Wax products in the past, but I read an excellent review on 5series.net couple months ago I figured I'd give it a shot on my '05 BMW Z4. The front end of my Z4 has probably about 100 paint chips and some minor swirls/scratches and this product was absolutely fantastic. All of the rock chips completely disappeared and the finish looks like absolute glass.

WEAR GLOVES!! It's messy stuff.

I picked it up at AutoZone for $20 and since the Z4 is such a small car I was able to get 2 full applications out of it so far and probably have enough for 2 more. All this being said, it only lasts through a couple washes and is very messy stuff. Be careful not to splash any on the concrete or accidentally drop the applicator on the ground as it will stain anything it touches (ask me how I know).

It's a great product, but keep in mind that its just a filler and it won't correct any paint problems. I'll definitely be reapplying right before I sell the car though.
 

·
Registered
1984 190D 2.2
Joined
·
2,458 Posts
I recently used Turtle Wax ICE liquid polish. It actually makes waxing really easy, and it only takes less than ten mins to do the whole car! Easy on, easy off. Im starting to use this every time I wash along with usin Carnauba wax at least twice a month. Stunning results, especially on a black car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Blackfire USA

I can tell you if you elect to try the Blackfire USA products the service is excellent, always someone to answer the phone, something was missing from my kit and they didn't hesitate to answer questions and immediately ship it out.

Hopefully will get it on next weekend,

FTB

BTW I think I'll pick up some of the Turtle Wax Black and give it a try.
 

·
Registered
Several MB's
Joined
·
352 Posts
Use only pure carnuba wax on your black car. Pure carnuba wax is the best wax to use because of its simple ingredients and lack of superfluous materials. Don't use wax kits or other types of commercially available waxes since they will just build up and cause faded areas on your black car.
Apply the wax with a damp sponge and in a thin layer, only allowing it to sit on the car for five minutes or less. Use a new, dry 100 percent cotton cloth to buff the wax away by hand. You may use two thin layers of wax for extra protection.
I used to feel the same as you but then I started using some of the newer sealants and won't go back. I was an avid supporter of Meguiar's #16 and recently did a test on the hood of my black SL55. I did 1/2 with #16 and the other half with Blackfire Wet Diamond. Right from the start the Blackfire gave me a deeper better shine and was much more slick. The durability on the Blacvkfire was much better after only one month.

You state pure carnuba wax----There is no such thing. Carnuba is as hard as a rock and the wax is mixed with other ingredients to make it useable. If you really are a perfectionist and own a black car you will be machine polishing it to remove the swirls and fine scratches that you will ultimately get. When you do this anything that was left on the paint will be removed, meaning that there will not be a build up of anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Use only pure carnuba wax on your black car. Pure carnuba wax is the best wax to use because of its simple ingredients and lack of superfluous materials. Don't use wax kits or other types of commercially available waxes since they will just build up and cause faded areas on your black car.
Apply the wax with a damp sponge and in a thin layer, only allowing it to sit on the car for five minutes or less. Use a new, dry 100 percent cotton cloth to buff the wax away by hand. You may use two thin layers of wax for extra protection.
This comment about Carnauba being best for black paint is an old school myth at best.

While there is nothing at all wrong with using any type of wax -- carnauba or synthetic -- on any paint of any color, we actually use our FX SynWax on our black and red show cars and big rig that see weather. Modern synthetics add gloss, help hide defects while adding depth, and provide excellent protection -- a pure carnauba only provides protection.

And of course by "pure carnauba" I mean there are not any secondary low-grade waxes in the product -- our California Gold Pure Carnauba Wax contains only Brazilian #1 pure carnauba, along with other good stuff to make it go on smooth.

But yes, two light coats can be a good thing.
 

·
Registered
2004 C320 Sport
Joined
·
4 Posts
I'll throw Pinnacle Souveran into the mix. Works really well on red and black and helps to give the paint more "depth".
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top