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Premium Member
1989 R107 560SL, 2006 R230 SL500
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521 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the entire body of the car I have one tiny spot of rust. Is this something I can fix myself maybe? Or does the entire trunk lid need to be redone?

Hood Automotive design Table Motor vehicle Bumper
 

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Registered
1987 560SL
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285 Posts
Clean the area as best you can. Treat with a rust converter and once fully cured touch up with paint pen. You may need to build the level of paint up with several coats so it is at least level or above the surrounding area. You then may need to very carefully flatten the spot with very fine wet & dry. Where it is won’t notice too much and white is not usually a colour match issue.
 

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1987 560SL
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285 Posts
Do you mean white doesn’t usually fade? There are umpteen shades of white.
No I just mean that white is easier to blend in with existing paint work.

I know that even MB done quite a few shades of white.

From his picture looks like arctic white, same as mine. Though on second look could even be a very light blue, as it looks different on my phone compared to on my iPad.
 

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Premium Member
1989 R107 560SL, 2006 R230 SL500
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521 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No I just mean that white is easier to blend in with existing paint work.

I know that even MB done quite a few shades of white.

From his picture looks like arctic white, same as mine. Though on second look could even be a very light blue, as it looks different on my phone compared to on my iPad.
Same as yours, inside and out.
 

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1989 560SL
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449 Posts
Rub that surface down to bare metal, as much as easily doable. Use rubbing compound; if you have a buffer, make sure it goes from the top down and from the outside to the inside as the wheel turns, always running off the end of the surface, never back on from an edge; if by hand, go side to side and off the bottom edge. Use any rust inhibiting primer you want, let it dry and buff back smooth and small as possible. Touch up color in layers as described in previous comments.

The deck lid is rolled (stamped) on the edges And water is migrating on the inside surface to create the rust. Try to get a little coating of thin rust inhibitor on the inside in such a way as to run down into the folded over area.
 

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Premium Member
'72 350SL, '85 300D, '98 E320, '19 Subaru Outback (sold '14 GLK250)
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13,477 Posts
In some larger areas, there are shops or mobile services that do small touch-ups. Used and new car dealers use them. In our smaller town, there used to be one, but they morphed into a full body shop. Lots of money in insurance repairs, not much in doing small touch-ups, I guess.

My SL has no rust, but our w123 and w210 do. The spots need attention at least once a year in our climate if car is winter driven. Right now I am in the middle of doing the wheel wells on the 85 W123. W210 is next.

What I do:
  • Mechanically clean the rust spots (wire brush, sandpaper or small sand blaster).
  • Apply rust converter (turns surface black; allow to dry; wash with water spray)
  • Brush high build sandable primer onto spots. Maybe several layers to build to paint level.
  • mask around the spots. Sand masked area smooth. Add more primer (or filler) if needed.
  • clean area to be painted using a suitable prep cleaner.
  • Spray on matching paint (Our local NAPA paint section blends paint to match) Use a piece of cardboard with or with out an opening to prevent overspray onto unmasked areas.
  • Or if repair is very small, perhaps apply paint with artist brush. I never had much luck with those pens.

At this stage in life, I am tired of these jobs! I need to find someone I can take cars to that will do touch ups. Cars are 24 and 38 years old. No need for perfection (like complete body panels painted.) SL is another thing - I had scrapes fixed by local shop with help from Hagerty :)
 

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Premium Member
1986 560SL with M120 V12 Engine, 1988 560SL Stock
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13,851 Posts
On the entire body of the car I have one tiny spot of rust. Is this something I can fix myself maybe? Or does the entire trunk lid need to be redone?

View attachment 2767040
Well I certainly wouldn't do the entire lid. Many people could fix this by themself on this forum. But the fact that you had to ask if it could be done by yourself, I would say no.
 

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Premium Member
1989 R107 560SL, 2006 R230 SL500
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521 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well I certainly wouldn't do the entire lid. Many people could fix this by themself on this forum. But the fact that you had to ask if it could be done by yourself, I would say no.
You are most likely correct, but everyone has to start someplace. What I think I will do is, take it to a place that can fix it much better than I and see what it would cost. If it's so much that I think I want to try it myself, then so be it. The worst thing that can happen is, I can't fix it and end up having to pay to fix it, but isn't that where I would be if I didn't at least look into trying it?

I wish people would rate repairs something like this:

A - Only Experts
B - Shade Tree Mechanic Doable
C - Noobs Can Try It
 

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Registered
1979 450SL UK spec
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2,517 Posts
Thanks for the pics, I was trying too establish if the rust had come from a paint chip or from within the double skin of the lid. Its still not totally clear.

Anyway, if it is just a paint chip gone bad then it's worth trying to fix yourself.

I would not use a rust converter, I would use a rust remover to get rid of as much rust as possible first before priming and maybe filling before painting.

Final touch up painting with a cheap air brush is also worth thinking about.

My boot lid was in much worse condition than yours so I bought a second hand one and repainted it having never painted before. It was difficult and expensive to get set up but worthwhile to me as I wanted to paint two cars.



 

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1977 450sl
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85 Posts
As far as the suggested rating system goes, I think everything can be attempted by a noob.
The key things are;
A)doing enough research to know what to expect,
B)to pay enough attention as you are going through the process to recognize if and when things are going off the rails, and
3)lastly a legitimate understanding of your own personal dedication to developing your own skills to complete the project to a level you will be satisfied with.
I have recently replaced all of the hard brake lines on my 450. 3 times. I did not make the correct flares the first time, leaning on the first point of doing enough research. Couldn’t get them to bleed properly the second time, recognizing that things were going wrong, I did them again the 3rd time, being committed to building my own skill levels. I didn’t call on a professional until I was satisfied that I had exhausted all of my options for learning on my own. Mobile pro inspected all of my work, and the equipment I was using. Turns out the “Mighty-Vac” I was using was not fully working to bleed out the brakes on its own. The pro reassembled everything as I had done it, he didn’t change any of my flares.
Bleeding my work the 2 man method resulted in a victory, and fully working brakes. It was a more than 2 year process, but the end result was exactly what I wanted from the beginning. I learned to do something I didn’t previously know how to do.
Everyone was a noob at everything once, but persistence and an acceptance of failure-without giving up, is how we become more skilled and knowledgeable
For me, I am in no great rush to get my car done, and I never expect to see it perfect, but I am determined to do everything I possibly can on my own.
I do research on this forum, as well as looking at not Mercedes’ specific information regarding whatever subject I’m looking at. Went through almost every brake flaring video I could find.
So I would suggest that a rating system might just deter the next Gymmy(LS swap project) or simply buying your first R107 might be too much for a Noob ( parts availability, changes mid years, variations since first built, etc.)
If you have the car, and are willing to try, then try. Worst thing that can happen is you try, fail, learn, grow, and hire a pro. Either way you learn and grow.


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