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Hi. My garage is great but they havent got a listing or schedule for when the timing tensioner/guides or chain needs doing. So they have no idea how long it would take or how much it woud cost.
I've also heard somewhere that there are some sort of grommets or channels that might have shrunk or become partially blocked that may be restricting oilflow when cold. (There is a tappity noise when first starting but not every time.)
They are a small independant but really good, and one of their mechanics did his apprenticeship with Mercedes.
For all that, what sort of ball-park amount would i need to be saving up for? Thanks in advance :)
 

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For starters, it is suggested that the timing chain, guides and tensioner be replaced every 100K miles. To do this job requires between 5-8 hours of labor. There is also a specific procedure that should be followed when changing the oil. The timing chain tensioner is hydrualic which means it has to have oil pressure on it when you first crank the engine. Right after an oil change, if you have not primed the tensioner FIRST, you could cause the timing chain to jump some teeth causing severe engine damage. I know because I just learned the hard way and had to replace the engine!! To prime the tensioner:
After filling the engine with approx 7.5 quarts of 20W-50W oil, remove the crank sensor wire from the ignition control unit. This wire is usually green and is located on the driverside of the engine compartment near the front. Crank the engine with this wire removed until you see the oil pressure gauge register and show some movement. Then plug the green wire back into the ignition control unit and start the engine. Run for a few minutes and check for leaks. Then top off the oil level as needed. This procedure is very important and should be followed every oil change.
 

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Forgot to mention:
Timing chain with master link $90.00
Upper and lower guide rails range from $27 to $70 each Uppers usually are more worn.
Tensioner with gasket $70.00
Valve cover gaskets $6.00 each
 

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Forgot to mention:
Timing chain with master link $90.00
Upper and lower guide rails range from $27 to $70 each Uppers usually are more worn.
Tensioner with gasket $70.00
Valve cover gaskets $6.00 each
DO NOT use the aftermarket tensioner...they are crap.

Same with rails.

Everything needs to be genuine but the chain, the OE/OEM are exactly the same.

Jonathan
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm sad, they wont do the job. Shame cos i totally trust em. Means saving double the amount for my local (independant) Mercedes specialist. May take a while.. :-(
 

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DO NOT use the aftermarket tensioner...they are crap.

Same with rails.

Everything needs to be genuine but the chain, the OE/OEM are exactly the same.

Jonathan

Hey Jonathan, not to argue about it, but I just replaced an aftermarket Febi Tensioner that had been in for 12 years, it actually lasted longer than the original Mercedes tensioner in mileage and years and was still going strong, but I replaced it anyway due to visions of trashed valves running thru my head after reading yours and others posts.

The original Mercedes tensioner went out completely and the entire engine had to be rebuilt, and then was replaced with a Febi aftermarket tensioner.

I have replaced tensioners in other M116 M117 engines with Febi and had no issues over the years, never tried any other aftermarket brand though.

Just my experiences lol

Good Luck
PTM
 

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I had a near new febi tensioner fail on a customers car...that was expensive. Had a few others start to slap shortly there after.

The Old Timers that have been @ this longer then I have been alive have nothing positive to say about aftermarket tensioners.
The biggest difference is the aftermarket units do not have anti bleed back valve the Genuine unit does.

Considering the $$$ at stake I always feel better using Genuine bits when ever it comes to the engines mechanical bits.

Jonathan
 

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I had a near new febi tensioner fail on a customers car...that was expensive. Had a few others start to slap shortly there after.

The Old Timers that have been @ this longer then I have been alive have nothing positive to say about aftermarket tensioners.
The biggest difference is the aftermarket units do not have anti bleed back valve the Genuine unit does.

Considering the $$$ at stake I always feel better using Genuine bits when ever it comes to the engines mechanical bits.

Jonathan
Maybe I have been lucky over the years, considering it is one of the weakest links in the 116/117 series.

If I were working on customers cars now and had to warranty my work I would probably have them pay for the Mercedes Genuine as well :D


Take Care,
PTM
 

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Any step by step pictorial out there for this procedure? I wouldn't mind replacing mine as a preventive.
 

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To he best of my knowledge, it's included in multiple (w. pics) timing chain, guide rails replacement threads to be found in the forum archive.
Cheers
 
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