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Hey All,
My last posting dealt with a presumed electrical problem with my '91 300 SEL M103 engine that I had rebuilt. It wasn't electrical but mechanical in nature. I discovered that I had installed the tensioning device wrong, ie. fully extended which put too much pressure on the timing chain rail and the chain. It snapped while at idle (luckily at idle). Once the timing case was removed I found the pin for the oil pump tensioner lever bent. The other two look fine but the lower right pin as shown in the pic's didn't make it.
I've read in the archives about using a dyno-bolt to extract the pins, but that won't work here as the thing is cocked at a good angle. A machinist that looked at the photos thought that if i tried bending the pin straight, it would likely break off. Since the engine is in the vehicle this is going to limit my options.
So how would you remove this bent pin?

Also, while troubleshooting the 'electrical' problem, I used a remote starter switch to bump the engine over a dozen or so times not realizing the valves were not moving, while the piston were. Crap. Is it probable that I just punched a hole in a piston(s) or bent their valves?
Again, any help WILL BE appreciated.
Rick L.
 

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Hey All,
My last posting dealt with a presumed electrical problem with my '91 300 SEL M103 engine that I had rebuilt. It wasn't electrical but mechanical in nature. I discovered that I had installed the tensioning device wrong, ie. fully extended which put too much pressure on the timing chain rail and the chain. It snapped while at idle (luckily at idle). Once the timing case was removed I found the pin for the oil pump tensioner lever bent. The other two look fine but the lower right pin as shown in the pic's didn't make it.
I've read in the archives about using a dyno-bolt to extract the pins, but that won't work here as the thing is cocked at a good angle. A machinist that looked at the photos thought that if i tried bending the pin straight, it would likely break off. Since the engine is in the vehicle this is going to limit my options.
Also, while troubleshooting the 'electrical' problem, I used a remote starter switch to bump the engine over a dozen or so times not realizing the valves were not moving, while the piston were. Crap. Is it probable that I just punched a hole in a piston(s) or bent their valves?
Again, any help WILL BE appreciated.
Rick L.
If you "cherry" the pin with a cutting torch, you can bend it straight, let it cool naturally, and don't force cool the metal. Then you should be able to use a tap and die set to cut threads into the stud. Using a bunch of washers and a good nut, you should be able to pull the pin out.


Only issue is, you may have to find another engine in the junkyard to do the procedure too. So that you can have a factory straight pin.
 
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