Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
Joined
·
3,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed two things:

1- The Rear Tire-to-Wheel Well Distance seems abnormally Low, especially with the kids in the back.

2- There is a subtle "Metalic" thud noise when going over bumps.

So, I was thinking the Spring pad could be either narrowed or hardened, making the spring act more like a metal on metal contact with the Spring Perch.

The following is a "Do it Myself" posting, intended SOLELY FOR ENTERTAINMENT PURPOSES *ONLY* and NOT to be used as a Guide for anyone else to use to work on their own vehicle. "IF" you do, it is at your own risk.

Working with Springs are EXTREMELY DANGEROUS, and can be *FATAL* if not done correctly. I use ONLY approved tools and procedures for this operation.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
99" CL500 (silver)SOLD, 99' CL500 (blk), 97' S500(silver), 01' S500 (Espresso)
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
Great Job, couple of questions...
1. Did this fix the "Metalic" thud noise?
2. Does the car sit higher?
3. Where did you get the spring compressor tool? and how much can one expect to pay. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
Joined
·
3,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Great Job, couple of questions...
1. Did this fix the "Metalic" thud noise?
2. Does the car sit higher?
3. Where did you get the spring compressor tool? and how much can one expect to pay. Thanks.
1- Yes, it is actually much quieter, and the ride slightly "softer".
2- Not exactly as high as I was expecting, but it is much closer, now, to the front height. I suspect there is at least "some" component of Spring Sag on this 14 year old car with 162,000 miles.
3- You don't want to know how much the MB/Klann set is. There is, though, a decent set available on Fleabay (a friend of OhLord's... it is something like "SG-Autosports"). It is made with Good-Quality Taiwanese Steele (yes, they CAN make decent steele). It is around $180 bucks.
 

·
Registered
1995 s500, 2004 s500, 1991 190e
Joined
·
880 Posts
i laughed my ass off at the title of this tread:D thank you for the write up. i am experiencing the same symptoms and will give this a try when i get home in november.
 

·
Registered
99" CL500 (silver)SOLD, 99' CL500 (blk), 97' S500(silver), 01' S500 (Espresso)
Joined
·
2,128 Posts
1- Yes, it is actually much quieter, and the ride slightly "softer".
2- Not exactly as high as I was expecting, but it is much closer, now, to the front height. I suspect there is at least "some" component of Spring Sag on this 14 year old car with 162,000 miles.
3- You don't want to know how much the MB/Klann set is. There is, though, a decent set available on Fleabay (a friend of OhLord's... it is something like "SG-Autosports"). It is made with Good-Quality Taiwanese Steele (yes, they CAN make decent steele). It is around $180 bucks.
Nice, glad it worked out for you... I think I might take this project on too for my C-140. Imma need to find the spring compressors, would like to know how much the real ones are... (I'm ready for the shock) I have the same thud noise... although I think while I'm there I'll change out the control arm bushings too.

Again thank you very much for the write up. :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
'84 300DT, '97 S320
Joined
·
680 Posts
G-AMG: nice write-up. The spring procedures are so nice when no shocks are involved.

I think I understand why you said not to use a power tool on this...you don't want to just put those plates and jackscrew in place, and just squeeze away. If something's not right, you'll find out sooner with the hand tool, and without damaging anything, most likely; but with the air-comp tool you can get into trouble quicker. Is that why you said no power tool?

When I replaced the front upper pads on my W123 a few years ago (using a similar spring compressor), however, I had no problem safely tightening the spring with an air compressor ratchet tool...the impact tool is definitely not appropriate. I did not just squeeze the trigger until it was tightened all the way. I squeezed it in very small increments at first to ensure everything looked lined up correctly...I tapped lightly on the plates occasionally to ensure they were set...not a bad idea even when not using the power tool. Then I squeezed it with longer increments. If you just be patient with it and ensure everything looks like it's not going to slip apart as it compresses, I think you'll be okay. When putting the spring back in, "after" ensuring the spring is correctly positioned of course as you said, once it looks like everything's okay, you still should be careful the spring assembly's not going to "let go". But once it's about half-way released, I just held the trigger and that worked okay. It definitely saved time. You just have to be careful -- doing a procedure just to save time could bite you big-time if you're not careful.

Many years ago I replaced the rear springs on my W115 - same tools but did it at the Air Force Base auto shop (Carswell , in Ft. Worth, BTW).

Dave H
 

·
Registered
'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
Joined
·
3,093 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I think I understand why you said not to use a power tool on this...
Dave H
actually, this particular Klann model specifically prohibits use of impact tools. There is even an engraving of an impact wrench with a big X through it.

Now, my McPhereson version ( where the clamping plates are off to the SIDE of the spring) actually IS certified for impact wrench use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,621 Posts
Chances are the springs too are shot with the age causing some sagginess.

Mine sags much worse than yours especially with a few adults and some luggage in the back

Sent from my SGH-T989 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

·
Registered
1997 S500 Coupe & 1994 S500 Coupe
Joined
·
846 Posts
Nice, glad it worked out for you... I think I might take this project on too for my C-140. Imma need to find the spring compressors, would like to know how much the real ones are... (I'm ready for the shock) I have the same thud noise... although I think while I'm there I'll change out the control arm bushings too.

Again thank you very much for the write up. :thumbsup:
Did you ever do this? and did it cure your metallic thud?
 

·
Registered
1987 230E silver W124 (sold). 1991 W140 400SEL silver.C280 W202 Silver (RIP) 2006 W203 C220 CDI
Joined
·
100 Posts


With the rear rubbers, would this explain the constant squeaking Im now getting from the rear?

Also, any idea of the part number or where to source them?

Cheers,
Ben
 

·
Registered
97 SL500, 98 E320 Wagon, 2002 ML500 - former W108/W112/W114/W123/W124/W126/W140/W220
Joined
·
6,233 Posts


With the rear rubbers, would this explain the constant squeaking Im now getting from the rear?

Also, any idea of the part number or where to source them?

Cheers,
Ben
Ben,

You'll have to get them from Mercedes. I am not aware of any aftermarket manufacturers.

Before you do, get underneath your car and look closely at the edge of the spring pads for some small "nubs" that stick out of the edges. You can see these in the picture on the pad on the right at the 8 o'clock and 4 o'clock positions. There can be as any as five of these, and the number indicates the proper spring pad to be used. You must replace them with the same pad, or it will affect your chassis height. They can vary from car to car, and were fitted specifically to your car at the time of assembly.

You can look up the proper numbers here:

Mercedes-Benz Parts - Shop Genuine Mercedes Parts Online at Mercedes-Benz of South Atlanta

Prices here in the States are around $USD 13-16 depending on the dealer and your discount level.

I'm a little confused by this writeup, as I would think with the spring compressed you could easily remove the pad without dropping the lower control arm. I'll go back and look at it again to be sure.

Dan
 

·
Registered
97 SL500, 98 E320 Wagon, 2002 ML500 - former W108/W112/W114/W123/W124/W126/W140/W220
Joined
·
6,233 Posts
I think I understand why you said not to use a power tool on this...you don't want to just put those plates and jackscrew in place, and just squeeze away. If something's not right, you'll find out sooner with the hand tool, and without damaging anything, most likely; but with the air-comp tool you can get into trouble quicker. Is that why you said no power tool?
You don't use an impact on these because it will cause the bearing in the tool to seize up.

I know of one instance where this occurred and the compressed spring, still in the now seized compressor, was entombed in a concrete slab at a construction site adjacent to the dealership.

Just like burying Jimmy Hoffa. :eek

Dan
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top