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2009 C350
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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed that my car has tons of swirls marks when it's near the sun. what's the best way to get rid of these? I tried waxing but it's not doing anything.
 

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2013 C300 Sport Darth V 3.0
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Go to a detailer. When you wash go in one direction not circles and use the two bucket method. Do not use machine car wash's
 

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This is going to be several hundred dollars from a detailer. We have a guy who comes to our office and "details" cars for $40. That's just a car wash.

All swirls can most likely be removed without issue. However, after that, they will come back if you don't adjust your care of the paint.

Absolutely right, no machine washes. And he mentioned "two bucket" wash. Google that. Essentially it means you get 2 5 gallon buckets. Buy a "Grit Guard" for each. One filled with soapy water. One filled with just Water. For the soap, I personally like P21S shampoo that you can buy at autogeek.net.

When you wash, use a microfiber pad or sponge or mitt. ALWAYS wash the microfiber in your washing machine between uses. Google for proper way to do it. I use detergent, dry it on low, no fabric softner or dryer cloth.

When you wash, dip the microfiber in the soapy water. Wipe down a section. Then dip the microfiber into the clean water. Scrape it against the grit guard. Remove any particulates. Then wring it out, then dunk it into the soapy water. Repeat.

Also, by washing your car weekly you'll avoid dirt build up so intense that it scratches when you wash.

Remember, black paint is very cruel. It shows everything. To properly take care of this paint you'll need to invest a few hours a week. That doesn't sound horrible but it's far more time than most invest in car washing.

Your other option I suppose is once a week pay for a proper car wash at a reputable place. Probably $50. But even then, I trust myself more.
 

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Mercedes C300 Sport, BMW 745Li, VW Mk6 Golf TDI
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And if you don't want to pay for a detailer, it's pretty simple to correct it yourself. Since you're local to socal, hit up the free Meg's detailing class which will teach you how to correct the paint using a buffer. There are tons of resources out there from autogeek, detailingbliss, autopia, etc with tons of info out there. But as mentioned, paint correction is only one step....changing your washing habit is the second unless you want to induce more defects back in.

Alternatively, and I'm usually not one to recommend this, but if you either don't have the means to do a paint correction or don't want to do it yourself, you can always try a glaze with fillers. This is more of a band-aid that will mask the swirls for a month or so. Wash the car, throw on a glaze, and toss on a layer of sealant to extend the glaze life.
 

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2009 C350
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Discussion Starter #5
thanks guys. I made a horrible mistake of going to a machine car wash almost weekly when I got the car. that really explains all the nasty swirls. I'm a newbie when it comes to washing cars. I just washed/waxed it today and it seems to look a little better but next I'll do polish/wax and use other products like swirl x from meguire's.
 

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I had bad swirl marks on my ride too. I ended up getting a DA polisher and use swirl X. The Swirl X wasn't enough since i had to do 3 passes so I ended up picking up Ult compound. That seems to work better if you have major swirl issue.
 

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thanks guys. I made a horrible mistake of going to a machine car wash almost weekly when I got the car. that really explains all the nasty swirls. I'm a newbie when it comes to washing cars. I just washed/waxed it today and it seems to look a little better but next I'll do polish/wax and use other products like swirl x from meguire's.
I used to have a black show car that I drove almost daily. It was difficult to keep swirl-free. Black reflects light in a uniform pattern. Lighter colors reflect light more randomly. There are swirls on most cars (except ours :)) no matter the color. They are just more evident on black cars. Anyway, if you are afraid to use a buffer, buy an Ultimate Detailer polisher. It's like a Porter Cable polisher, but improved. Search it. I think you'll find it to be a good investment. Get a kit if you can because they come with the stages of polishes and pads you will need to remove/ reduce your swirls and apply wax.
 

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This is my third black car so far, VW, Volvo and MB.

I have always done the same against the swirls, since there is no way to avoid them. I am always cleaning my car myself almost every week, with a microfibre sponge and a wax shampoo from SONAX. You may want your washer to use such a sponge as well, if you carry it along with you. Once every 6 months or a year, I wax my car again with SONAX Extreme Wax. They disappear and donot appear for a while. Even if you let someone else wash your car, waxing it once every 6 months, should decrease the amount of swirls you see under direct light.

This is the doom of the black cars, unfortunately.
 

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Good Tips, definitely. I do want to say, with proper care, you can almost eliminate swirls, even on black cars. Not entirely so, but almost. And, minimized to that extent, you can very easily polish them out using a DA (aka random orbital) buffer.

The process I outlined above works for me. The big points being: Use multiple wash mitts (or pads or sponges) per wash. Use one for a little while, then set it aside and use a fresh one. Use a grit guard in a 2-bucket wash. Always wash your pads/sponges/mits/etc in the washing machine between uses. Use a high quality shampoo, i personally love my P21S.

For drying, similar idea: Have many good microfiber waffle weave towels. Use one for a short while, then set it aside. Always wash them between washes. Keep them in plastic bags so they don't get contaminated.

The simple idea is, minimize the liklihood that grit will be trapped in your sponge/mitt by rinsing first. For the grit that will get caught on your sponge, maximize your chances of clearing it by using a rinse bucket with a grit guard that you scrub the sponge against before you re-soap it. For the grit that still stays stuck to your sponge, ensure it does limited damage by swapping out for a fresh sponge at least twice during the wash, some people do it 4 times.

Similar for drying.
 
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