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I'm working to swap out my hydraulic accumulators on the SLS and am really struggling with the main banjo fitting into the accumulators. Any tips?

What I've done: I've broken the nut closest to the accumulator free ("C" in the picture attached). But when I turn it, the whole fitting behind it turns too, including the attached hose. This makes it impossible to back it all the way out. I attached a pair of vice grips to the outermost part of the fitting ("A" in the picture attached), holding that part still while I rotate the 17mm wrench on "C". Is this the correct approach? It's still very hard to turn, so I'm worried that's not...

Any tips sure appreciated. This is a tough one due to the limited space. I did do a search and have also got Kent Bergsma's video on this, but it doesn't have this level of detail and I'm worried I'm gonna break something. Thanks all!
 

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Use localized heat on the fitting, think in terms of a "Bernz - O - Matic" type propane torch. Usually you have to go nuclear on these fittings after all these years. You might have to sacrifice the hose then. Unfortunately they are not cheap, but if they are original to the car this is a good opportunity to replace them anyway. Good flare wrenches can help too, plus a good counterhold is key.
 

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Thank you both, @Dikdaan and @MBL87560SEC! Knowing that I'm at least thinking about this right is helpful. I'll try some penetrating lube and may go the heat route too. The diagrams are helpful too. For now, I buttoned it all up and decided to wait until I have the car up on a lift. I was trying to do this with it up on jack stands, but I think there simply isn't enough room to get the leverage I'll need.
 

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you ultimately transfer that fitting from old to new, so be very careful. You may need to just remove the other end of the hose or sacrifice it and buy new but really no need for that, Try two wrench method as a counter hold to the hose and to the fitting.

New copper washers are a must for all connections loosed. I was able to remove the hose but to get the fitting, I had to get the sphere in a vise for leverage.
 

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If I am not mistaken, B is the one you have to break loose from C. The fitting is a flange type just like a soft copper pipe type. So you have to hold C in place, then put a wrench on B and turn that counter clockwise. Then after the hose is out that C piece which is really an adapter can be screwed out of the Nitrogen sphere. It should not be that terribly tight since I think one is brass. Good luck
 

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I just replaced the accumulators today on my '88 560SEC. Do not mess with A, you are just damaging the hose. Use an open end wrench on C to keep it from moving while you using a 17mm line wrench on B to turn it counter-clockwise. Since B looks pretty chewed up in your photo, a line wrench probably won't fit over the fitting anymore. I agree with @Richter Rox, remove the other end of the hose from the shock and pull everything out together. Once it is out you might as well replace the hose. Also, the new accumulators DO NOT come with a new copper crush washer that goes in between the new sphere and the adapter. It is roughly 12mm X 16mm X 1.5mm. Let us know how you made out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Guys, thank you so much! Each of these replies sheds a little light.

@HardwayMB and @Richter Rox - got it. Is the attachment point to the shock relatively accessible? (And by 'relatively', I mean no more terrifically difficult to get to than the accumulator fittings?) I will look in the factory service manual too to find the attachment point.

@HardwayMB , thanks for the details on the washer. I noticed too that there were none in the kit. You just saved me a lot of research on the size of them.

When I wrote my original post, I was a couple hours into this project, working on my back with the car on jack stands. I realized that I was getting into trouble and ended up buttoning everything back up so that I could drive the car the next day in a gimmick road rallye here in the Northwest. I'm going to get the few extra parts now - washers, hoses most likely - and then wait until I can have the car on a lift for better access and less awkwardness on my middle-aged frame.

I will report back when I take the next step - and will try to document for future searches. Thanks again for the help.
 

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To access the top of the strut, you have to remove the seat backs. wear gloves until you know where things are at removing the seat-back. Put hands under bottom of back cushion and lift toward the backglass. The glove protect your hands as the aluminum back edges can be razor sharp (ask me how I know). You will reposition the fire blanket to expose the rubber triangular body plug, exposing the top of the strut. Use a wrench as a counter on the strut fitting, and the banjo fitting. If you have no choice but to use the copper crush washers again, put a very light coat of MB green wheel bearing grease on the mating surface of the washer. Also note that the bushings that the strut mounts to the frame of the car are most likely prolapsed at worst, and unable to properly absorb the movement translating into thuds being felt in the frame. You can change these later but order top and bottoms new from MB.


Also - open both rear windows, it is less hot to work outside the car but take note: The window does not go all the way down. I place a folded moving blanket over the area to protect the fragile glass, and the NLA escutcheon on the peak of the side panel from me bending into the car to work. TAKE NOTE THIS IS ON AN SEC, your car I realized is a SEL, so just work from within the car once you remove the seat backs. The rest is ostensibly the same.
 

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@281lxm , thank you. That sounds like a fair amount of work, but worth it if the access is easier - and I gather it's good to replace these hoses anyhow at the same time.

Put hands under bottom of back cushion and lift toward the backglass. The glove protect your hands as the aluminum back edges can be razor sharp (ask me how I know).
Do you or does anyone else know whether the procedure in a 560SEL with the reclining back seat is just as easy? Or is there more complication in removing the vertical (back) part of the rear seat?
 

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@281lxm , thank you. That sounds like a fair amount of work, but worth it if the access is easier - and I gather it's good to replace these hoses anyhow at the same time.







Do you or does anyone else know whether the procedure in a 560SEL with the reclining back seat is just as easy? Or is there more complication in removing the vertical (back) part of the rear seat?


Best for you to read the manual, it is free.
 
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