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1992 400E 220k
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23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings,
I saw an episode of Pat Goss' Garage and he showed spark plug replacement on a motor with alloy heads. I don't know what kind of car it was but it had individual coils. Anyway he said that it was very important to turn all the spark plugs a quarter of a turn, then start the motor and gun it to blow out any carbon build up before removing the plugs. I didn't do this to my 400E. I had no problems getting them out and in. This is the second time I've done the job and have always used anti-seize grease on all my cars. Did I do something wrong?
Please advise as I don't want to mess up a head.
Thanks,
Curt
 

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'91 C124 300CE, '06 W164 ML500, '00 BMW MCOUPE, '65 COBRA REPL.
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547 Posts
I have changed a few spark plugs in different cars with al. heads.
Never needed to do this.
You have done good by using anti seize.
You are good to go.
 

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1993 300E, 2003 996 Turbo X50
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624 Posts
I've replaced hundreds of spark plugs and never in my life have I done this. A little dab of anti seize and you are good to go.
 

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Premium Member
About a dozen 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1991 sedans, wagons, 4Matics and 1 coupe
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5,466 Posts
Ditto with the above comments.
It's always a good idea to blow out the spark plug recesses with compressed air before loosensing the plugs. You don't want dirt, sand, rust, or even gooey oil to drop into the cylinder when you remove the plugs. Some engines have deep recesses and, depending on driving conditions where you are, there can be some ugly stuff in there especially if a plug change is overdue.
I have seen some horrific accumulations of crap in the plug bores, but only on engines with cast iron heads.
As for Pat Goss's rationale on running the engine, well, I don't agree with it. While compression and combustion forces may push debris past the threads I doubt they would push it out the plug bore. Plus there's the intake stroke that would suck the stuff deeper into the threads, right?
 

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1995 E420; 1995 E320 Estate, 1995 C220 (GF)
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325 Posts
It's not like Pat Goss is a real expert - this is a Maryland PBS show - they aren't very sophisticated, and Goss' Garage makes me laugh - or it did, back when I bothered. Haven't see it in years...
 

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1995 E320
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2,548 Posts
A lot of the stuff some of these fuddy duddies recommend is based on old technology and old practises.

I worked as a Mercedes mechanic and never ever heard that from any of the more experienced mechanics while I was doing my apprenticeship.
 

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1977 230, 1990 300E 2.6
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243 Posts
While I don't agree with the need for the technique described by Pat Goss for spark plug removal, I will come to his defense as far as his knowledge of cars. Pat Goss is not just a TV personality. His original, and continuing business, was auto repair. He is a fully certified mechanic as well as an auto care instructor and has been in the business for many years. Motor Week airs all over the world and they must be very careful about the accuracy of the information given on the show or they would face the possibility of law suits.
 

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Registered
1995 E420; 1995 E320 Estate, 1995 C220 (GF)
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325 Posts
While I don't agree with the need for the technique described by Pat Goss for spark plug removal, I will come to his defense as far as his knowledge of cars. Pat Goss is not just a TV personality. His original, and continuing business, was auto repair. He is a fully certified mechanic as well as an auto care instructor and has been in the business for many years. Motor Week airs all over the world and they must be very careful about the accuracy of the information given on the show or they would face the possibility of law suits.
Yes, and he still dispensed goofy advice. Plenty of certified fool in the world, BTW...

Oh yeah, law suits over TV advice - have you got a precedent?
 
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