Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
'01-E320 & 02-ST2
Joined
·
31,633 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey, folks.

For those of you with the inevitable in-gear idle vibration that signals motor mounts, you're most likely closing in on 100,000 miles (maybe only 90, but again, closing in). Today I helped some friends of mine with a MY 00 210 do both motor mounts and spark plugs. We did one motor mount at a time, allowing the engine to lift on only one side, but affording LOTS of extra room to change the plugs on the raised side.

For those of you who've read some of my other posts about doing spark plugs on my car, you know I didn't really enjoy the experience -- especially the driver's side. So unscrewing one bolt and raising the engine makes that job lots easier. Too, remember to hit the catch and raise the hood all the way, not just at the first stop.

Or, if you have bad motor mounts and are closing in on 100K, order plugs and do both at the same time, as we did today.

I ended up doing most of the work and we were done in a little under four hours from parking the car to everything put away and taking care of all the resets.

So, that's my tip -- solely for your consideration -- to make the plug change much easier. I figure it adds about ten minutes to R&R the lower bolts one at a time and raise and lower the engine twice (again, one side at a time). How much time it saves in the plug change may not be dramatically more than that (after all, you still have the work of getting the caps off (and back on, which the Lisle tool makes a bit easier) and then actually changing 12 (or 16) plugs, which takes time, but the frustration level was dramatically lower, and I didn't scrape a knuckle or pick up any cuts. Indeed, I was sort of dreading the plugs, but I thought about doing them while the engine was rocked up and it turned out that the motor mounts were more trouble than the plugs. Oh, and aligning the compressor bolts was fun, too. :) I'd forgotten how much fun it was to do such a job laying on my back...

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

·
Registered
1994 E320 Wagon,1999 E320 Wagon,2000 E 320 Wagon, MGB Track/Rally, ,1988 300E ,more....
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
At our

get together last weekend for my spark plug seminar,with plenty of chatting,talking mods,getting sun burned :eek:checking out Jons incredible off road pick up truck and johns lowered custom C320 and raymond g's cool custom color matched burgundy seats that match his paint.We did the c320 plugs,imagine the same 320 v6 as in the w210 shoved into an engine bay about 30% smaller:D and we did a w210 plugs both in under 3 hours start to finish.With the aid of the 17mm offset plug tool it was a snap.Those pliers for the plug boots make it a chore even with the engine lifted.Get the 17mm and you will enjoy the next session.
We are planning a polish,wax detail show car shine class next that I'm going to teach and if anybody needs to do the plugs,I'll teach them while we wax around them:thumbsup:
Looking at dealer prices of in excess of $500 for just a plug change on a E320
I think I'm going to be selling lots of the $28 spark plug boot removal tools and doing more tutorials soon.It was a blast to meet these guys and it seemed like we knew each other already.
ohlord:bowdown:
 

·
Registered
'01-E320 & 02-ST2
Joined
·
31,633 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hey, ohlord.

Before I post a tip I always consider whether it might be useful for others, whether it's flat wrong (e.g., using conventional oil), whether it will have negative results, etc.... and I also recognize and appreciate that there might be other ways to do things. Doubtless you are far more experienced with MB vehicles than I (and probably more than most members here). That said, you seem to think that my only issue in doing my plugs was in getting the caps off, but that wasn't it. While the wrench you tout so strenuously simplifies one part of this job (and I'll accept your word that it is ideal for the 210 and better than the Lisle tool in this discreet part of the process), it's still only a small part of the job -- albeit one that can be very frustrating without some tool to get the caps off without damaging the wires.

However, once the caps are loose, they still must be extricated, and tools (including a torque wrench) must be manipulated in fairly tight confines -- and of course the plugs themselves have to be removed and the new ones installed (without poking the new plug tip into a dirty cylinder head as you seek the bore hole). And of course you have to get the cap back on, which to me is harder than getting it off, particularly with the engine down in the well.

Initially the Lisle tool takes a bit of manipulation to get caps off, but by the third MB plug I found a simple twist to break the cap loose and then a wiggle while pulling and the cap pops right off. And while you're done with the wrench once the cap is popped loose, the Lisle tool can be used to snap the cap back home on the new plug (same as removal, a little twist and a wiggle while pushing, and you get the click). Moreover, as a general rule it's advisable on most cars to use some tool on the plug wires to avoid damaging them, and the Lisle tool has been useful on other makes, which can't be said for the wrench. Lastly, while noted the Lisle tool takes some familiarization, and from reading a couple of other posts it seems there is as well a learning curve for the proper use of the wrench to facilitate the cap removal.

Every one of the steps in the plug DIY as referenced above is made significantly easier by raising the engine a couple of inches one side at a time. Is it in the WIS? No. Will experienced MB mechanics use it? No. Will the casual DIY person here benefit by having extra room to do a job with which they are perhaps already uncomfortable? Almost certainly. (Indeed, I'd bet the newbie DIY-er would be able to do this with the engine raised more quickly and with less frustration and skinned knuckles than leaving it sunk in the well, whether they use the wrench, the Lisle tool, a small c-clamp, wire-wrap or otherwise.) And naturally I would not recommend raising the engine if it were itself difficult, but MB did a nice thing with the single bottom bolt on the motor mount (I can still remember changing motor mounts on a 72 Lemans with a 455...nightmarish, it was nothing to mess with unless you had to.) Here it's stunningly simple and easy and makes the plug job easier and less frustrating, particularly for the novice. (Moreover, if you have to do the mounts anyway, joining these jobs together is a wonderful tip.)

Am I saying everyone should raise the engine to change the plugs? No. That it's the best way? Not necessarily (although I would contend that if someone is closing in on the plug change interval and has to do the motor mounts anyway, might as well do both and enjoy the extra working space). Nonetheless, the tip may be useful for others, it's not wrong, and it won't have negative results (so long as folks follow the normal precautions for raising the engine and briefly being under a car).

At the end of the day, engine down or engine up, the result is what you and I both seek: folks saving money and gaining satisfaction by taking care of their car themselves.:thumbsup:

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
 

·
Registered
2001 E320 Wagon
Joined
·
285 Posts
In short to follow your method (I might consider doing both plugs and mounts) I should read the DIY on changing motor mounts and the DIY for plugs right?

Perhaps you could do a small write up on your method and put it in the spark plug DIY as an alternative method. Something with your input would make it clearer than a newbe like me.

You make great sense - plugs and mounts, they are due at the same time.

My engine idles a little rough (like a slight miss) in gear. RPM barely moves but you can feel it. Maybe it is time for spark plugs and mounts. BTW does failing CPS contribute to rough idle?
 

·
Registered
1999 E320, 2001 E320, 2004 S430
Joined
·
991 Posts
It sounds like a great idea to raise the engine to make it easy to do the plug job and replace the engine mount at the same time. It's a great idea.

I've never done a engine mount job before. So, it's a big unknown to me. The other thing is that I'm always scared of getting under the car.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top