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SOMEONE end my dilema!!!!

1634 Views 12 Replies 3 Participants Last post by  Piotr
Hi everyone havent been in here in a botu a month but have always gotten good responses in the past. My car is a 1987 190e 2.6 runs fairly well, starts right up and idles great. But when the negine is hot or even warmed up it is hard to start it. I have to give the car gas to keep it running and slowly nurse the car till it is idling on its own? Now im sure you will all agree, i own a mercedes i shouldnt have to plow it with gas everytime i start it, if i wanted that i would buy a chevy! any help on this matter would be greatly appreciated, thanks! Evan
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36,559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2 things i can think of

1. Idle control regulator<br>
or<br>
2. Battery, this happened to me, the battery that is in the car has plenty of volts(fully charged)but does not meet the cold cranking amps required to run the car. An easy way to test this is, look at your volt meter if its fine your battery is charged, and then try to turn off all unneeded accesories, like AC, fan, heat, radio, stuff like that. If the idle smooths out, you may wanna check how many amps your battery makes and how many the car requires.
 

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36,559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is vapor lock?

<br>
<br>
<br>
VAPOR LOCK<br>
<br>
Vapor lock occurs when excessive gasoline vapor accumulates<br>
somewhere in the fuel system — fuel pump, fuel line, carburetor,<br>
or fuel injector — and reduces or interrupts the fuel supply to the<br>
engine. When the fuel supply is reduced, the air-fuel ratio<br>
becomes too fuel lean (too much air for the amount of fuel),<br>
which may cause loss of power, surging or backfiring. When the<br>
fuel supply is interrupted, the engine stops and may be difficult to<br>
restart until the fuel system has cooled and the vapor<br>
recondensed. Overheated fuel is the main cause of vapor lock.<br>
Fuel temperature depends on the air temperature, how hard the<br>
vehicle is working, how well the fuel system is isolated from the<br>
heat of the engine and how effectively the fuel system is cooled.
 

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1995 E420
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10 Posts
Piotr,
I don't know how hot it gets where you live,
but here in Chicago,it can get ...


Piotr,
I don't know how hot it gets where you live,
but here in Chicago,it can get up to 95-98 deg.F
w/the heat index 100-115 deg F.Personal experience,
my 2.6 suffered vapor locked.Its the fuel accumulator.
Some tech.that I know they have seen vapor lock from
the fuel distributor.Its embarassing that all of a
sudden the car will stall.And after waiting for 15-20
mins.it will start like nothing happened.It happened
after a spirited run on a hot summer day.
 

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1996 Stang, 1995Jeep
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22 Posts
Same temp

We get the same (like today) temperatures. The last time I had (or rather my dad did) a vapor lock was in 1978 back in the "Old Country" in our Dacia (i.e. Rumania - made Renault 12- Rumania exported these things all over the "Eastern Block"). That's why I question this. I have a 1988 Jeep Grand Wagoneer (carburated) and I never had a vapor lock. The original lock meant that fuel vapor would get into a carburator, and the mixture would be too rich for ignition. I understand what you are describing, but to me these are two different (although similar) issues.
 
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