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Hi, I'm a regular on the w124 board, but it's time to upgrade! [:D] I'm shopping around for an '89ish 560SL and since this is a different model than what I'm used to I would appreciate any tips and suggestions for things to look out for, or things to ask the dealer/owner. What are problematic things for the R107's? Thanks for your help!
 

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2017 Police Interceptor Utility, 2017 Police Interceptor Sedan
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[:)]Hi,

I am a proud owner of an '86 560sl. It's the exact same as '89 so whatever pr...


[:)]Hi,

I am a proud owner of an '86 560sl. It's the exact same as '89 so whatever problems mine is prone to so would an '89. I bought mine in February 2000 with 29k on the clock and it now has over 80K. There have been exactly ZERO major problems, but some very interesting minor ones. One day it refused to shut off. I hd never seen that before, ususally cars refuse to start. Turns out the ignition relay was stuck on. The next problem was caused by me using aftermarket brake pads. These turned out to be too big and ended up warping front rotors as well as damaging the master cylinder. That was a $700 lesson for me. The car does have a small oil leak from the rear seal, losing about a quart (out of 9) between oil changes. I am too lazy to have that addressed. Currently it seems to have a stuck start valve so it can be hard to start sometimes. I have the part on order. Also, I find that it helps cleaning the injectors with Berryman B-12 about once every three months. Anyway, these cars seem to be basically trouble free as long as you keep up the maintenance. Feel free to ask any specific questions you might have


Ike
 

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BenzWorld W126 & W201 Host
1988 420SE, 2002 C180 Kompressor, 200 ML320
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560sl

lance

Two of the most expensive problems on that model, and all MB 560 auto's, are the engine rear main oil seal and the tranny front pump seal. Both leaks clearly visible under the engine/tranny (be wary if the underside of the tranny and engine have been steam cleaned). If they have, give it a good road test, leave it idling for a good time and then check underneath for any fresh oil.

Both those jobs need the tranny out to fix.

Worn valve seals are also common on high mileage models, so check for the plume of blue smoke when it starts up.

Worn timing chain is also common on high mileage models. The easiest way to check this is to be there when the car is started from cold. The chain makes a bad slapping sound for the first few seconds.
 
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