Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

41 - 46 of 46 Posts

·
Premium Member
1987 560SL
Joined
·
345 Posts
MMMMM I see many brands of Cam gears. Wonder if, "you get what you pay for" apply's here too?

OES Genuine Cam Gear $88.95 Retail $104.00
Laso Cam Gear $64.95 Retail $100.00
Swag Cam Gear $36.95 Retail $298.00
Febi Cam Gear $24.95 Retail $306.00
 

·
One of the BW Old Guard/R129, W204 Moderator
1997 SL500- 40th Anniversary
Joined
·
7,162 Posts
Courtesy of 'Diamond Chain'

Most of the wear is within the pin and roller, however the link plates can also stretch over time, though at a significantly slower rate.
perfect!
thx for the diagram... This is what I was trying to explain in a few posts earlier...
 

·
Premium Member
1987 560SL
Joined
·
345 Posts
Fonzi you inspired me.
I picked up a few parts for my timing today. These four items for $125.00. I thought was a fair price. I found them from a individual that bought this stuff then sold his car and didn't need them anymore. Worked out great. Now all I got to do is get Fonzi over here. I haven't even inspected my stuff yet, hell it may all be good, just couldn't pass up on a deal.

What else do I need?

1. Guide Rail in Head L/R 560SL
2. Guide Rail in L/T Head 560SL
3. Timing Chain Rail 560SL
4. Timing Chain 560SL
5. Valve cover Gaskets and cam oilers coming.
 

Attachments

·
Outstanding Contributor
450slc5.0cab 280sl5sp 280se4.5 500seAMG +250seStkW108 350sl4spdX3 500secEuro
Joined
·
22,229 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
Fonzi you inspired me.
I picked up a few parts for my timing today for $125.00 what else do I need?

1. Guide Rail in Head L/R 560SL (I'm re-using my metal-backed 1973's... because they are metal backed)
2. Guide Rail in L/T Head 560SL (I'm re-using my metal-backed 1973's... because they are metal backed)
3. Timing Chain Rail 560SL (I'm re-using my metal-backed 1973's... because they are metal backed)
4. Timing Chain 560SL
5. Valve cover Gaskets and cam oilers coming. (I'm re-using mine because thy look perfect, and they are not the paper-type gaskets that are often associated with valve cover gaskets. They will be easy to replace later, but of course will require more copper crush washers. See below.)

Add these to your list:

- copper crush washers for valve covers
- Timing chain tensioner (QUITE IMPORTANT)
- cam sprockets
- cam oiler tubes

Tools:

- 27mm socket to turn crank with ~5-6" extensions on a nice ratchet

- ~7/8" wrench (or adjustable I guess) for cam sprocket bolts (I didn't have a metric, but 7/8" seemed like a perfect fit.. 22 mm?)

- two (better yet three) vice grips. I had the chain slip while cranking when I was using zip-ties. I don't recommend them. I got by with two vice grips instead of three. I used the sequence shown in the attached pictures below to get by with only two vice grips, only using the small one on the leading new chain, and the big one on the trailing old chain. (I tried flip flopping, they didn't fit.)

- some type of grinder to grind off the original chain with no master links (unless you have a chain with a master link). I just put a grinder on my drill, ground off the numbs, and then pried off the link. See last picture.

- only needed a flathead and a hammer to bang off the link.

- flathead works well to put on new master link clips

- newspaper and/or cloths to assure you don't drop anything down in the engine, most importantly your new master link parts.



I think I recommend changing the oil before doing this work if it hasn't been done in a while. I wish I knew that I was running only fresh oil through my new tensioner. I'm worried about crap left on the sides of the engine walls that will get run through my tensioner since I didn't do my engine flush, or even an oil change first.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
1987 560SL
Joined
·
345 Posts
Thanks Fonzi. UDAMAN
 

·
Registered
1972 350SL
Joined
·
441 Posts
Take a real good look down into the area behind the timing cover, below the tensioner rail. You can see the lower rail on that side with a bright flashlight.

Ours were badly worn - almost clear through. Perhaps they wear faster as they age. Yes, you have to drop the subframe and remove the pan to get timing cover off safely. Compared to the high kilobuck engine replacement - needs to be done.

Most people play down the need to replace the lower guides. I think that is short sighted. The older they get, the more crucial it is to understand the condition of these parts before making a decision. May not matter on a newer car today, on the other hand they may need changing now, and certainly they eventually it will.

I am sure age, miles, and maintenance all contribute to wear. These cars are getting oldrt. A heck of a car, but wear parts need replaced. If a timing gear wears, imagine what can happen with the plastic.

Inspect and bite bullet if needed.
 
41 - 46 of 46 Posts
Top