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Banned
2005 Mercedes S500 Designo with ABC
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144 Posts
Where do you live anyway? Maybe someone that's done it and/or has the offset wrench is close enough to lend a hand?
The wrench with a long socket extension to bring it up above the engine is the way to go I think. Can't get full rotations, on it, but you can turn it by repositioning the wrench. A lot. But again, without having had to deal with ABC I can't say for sure. Even without ABC the driver side was significantly more difficult.
The top of the mount is keyed to fit without rotating, if I recall. It's my understanding that they are hydraulic, and similarly if you unbolt the bottom of a shock (or motorcycle fork) you can spin it without affecting the top. That's why the bottom will turn.
That's a very generous offer, I'm in Aggieland Texas, so pretty far from civilization.

My local mechanic has generously allowed me the use of his (massive) shop tomorrow where I plan on taking care of a number of other issues that need taking care of.

If worst comes to worst I can put everything back together and figure it out in the shop. One last thing I will try is a long flex top wrench, and if I'm feeling especially insane I will remove the valve cover and headers giving me direct access with a socket.

If someone is located in aggieland and does happen to have the tool, please PM me ASAP as I plan on starting early tomorrow!
 

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Banned
2005 Mercedes S500 Designo with ABC
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144 Posts
Driver's Side Engine Mount on ABC Equipped vehicles.

Ok, I'd like to add to this DIY as it is *very* doable at home, and having a lift does *not* necessarily make it easier. I used steel ramps to raise the car and placed the jacks as an added precaution (I did notice one of the ramps went down a bit requiring me to raise up the car to remove the jack).

Remember safety is paramount when working on your car, and especially this job as you'll be putting major stress on the engine and chassis as you move things around while you're hand is deeply recessed within this car.

Remember, with this DIY you'll be getting more intimate with your car than most people (short of surgeons) ever are with another human being.

For the passenger side, follow the DIY as written. The problem arises with the driver's side Engine Mount as the ABC High Pressure line and Reservoir hose are in the way.
Picture 2 shows a stubby wrench on the bolt (Notice the heat shield from the header has been removed). The end of the wrench is about 5mm from the chassis, and it's almost impossible to get enough torque applied to break the bolt.

Picture 1 is a zoomed out version of picture 2. Notice the stubby wrench on the bolt in between the ABC lines in the bottom. It also gives a feel for how deep into the engine you're digging. Those black wires are the spark plug wires. Also notice the header heat shield is removed. It's not necessary for the passenger side but I do recommending it for the driver's side.

Anyway, so how did I break the bolt, I used the special wrench/ratchet extenders generously loaned to me by my local mechanic. With yourself standing on the side of the vehicle, use your left hand to feed the tool between the abc lines. Your right hand will then catch the tool and be able to place it securely onto the bolt.

Now comes the extra special harbor freight modern-art tool. After placing your wrench extender, feed the harbor freight tool in and insert it into the 3/8" ratchet socket. Once it's in place, you'll be able to use this method to apply enough torque to break the bolt.

Alternatively you can try placing the ratchet extender on the special tool first and then feeding it onto the bolt. I tried both, many times.

I noticed once I had broken it that it spun relatively freely, although not freely enough to use my fingers. This is where your 16mm flex head wrench comes in. You can use that to slowly work the bolt out. Once you've loosened it enough to free it from its slot (see new engine mount), you'll be able to go underneath and spin the engine mount relatively freely.

Once you've completely disconnected the engine mount, you will feed it out as described by OP, however with the caveat that the high pressure ABC line will be in the way. You will likely need a helper, as you have to *really* jack up the engine, feed its way out. Ideally have a friend on top jerk the engine repeatedly towards the passenger side giving you room. Try not to put too much pressure on the ABC line as you feed it out.

Do the same thing to get the new engine mount in, and re-attach as described by OP. Ideally you can use a 16mm wrench to hold the bolt as you spin the new mount in.

One thing to note, the little stubby part has to recess into its groove/slot. Simply turning it until it won't turn no more will push it up against its slot, but not into it. What I found works is once you've spun the mount in until it won't spin anymore, loosen it, and feel it into its slot by pushing up. If you push the mount up and it doesn't spin left or right, you've successfully slotted it and the bolt can be tightened (ideally while you're still pushing up).

Torque the upper bolt using your hands to ~55nm. There is no way a torque wrench will work.

Since I did not have the Mercedes Engine Mount tool, I cannot comment on if it will work on the w220 with ABC. If you do this job, I highly recommend ordering one and at least trying it. Then you *might* not need the harbor freight tool and the special ratchet extenders, but I can provide no guarantees (maybe someone else can report back).

Some extra notes:

If you're doing the valve cover gasket and/or spark plugs, do the engine mounts in conjunction as the spark plug wires and coils are kind of in the way, as well as the valve cover gasket.
I was tempted to just remove the valve cover and remove the headers, thus giving me direct access to the bolt using any socket. You may want to consider this route.

The WIS suggests removing the ABC pump and disconnecting the AC compressor, then removing the entire engine mount assembly. I see their logic, as the ABC lines were the real headache getting to the bolt, and disconnecting (not removing) the AC compressor would make it possible to elegantly remove the mount. Also you would be able to appropriately torque the engine mount bolt on top. I also see however that I would rather have AIDS than have to unnecessarily remove the ABC pump, and loosening the AC compressor I assume is also no walk in the park.


Anyway, I hope this helps. I am ashamed to admit this job took me 3 days to do, mostly because I was stuck with the driver's side, however if you have the right tools (which you now know what to get), and have some idea of how to do it (which you now know) it realistically shouldn't take you more than 2 hours to do the driver's side mount.

Good Luck!

-FC


[edit] Quick note on the flip flops, I have broken my stubby toe pretty badly and can't wear shoes. Otherwise I wouldn't recommend using flip flops for any car repair.
 

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2004 (w220) S500 & (R230) SL550 2007
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644 Posts
is this the final word?

I am getting ready to do the motor mounts in the non 4 matic S500 with standard air suspension.

Has the forum discovered any added tricks, tips or shortcuts to this tricky repair?

Is it done best with jack stands or ramps? One would have weight on suspension and one would just have
suspension hanging down. Does it matter?

Yes I got the weird 16mm wrench in advance and ordered Lemforder parts although other brands were MUCH cheaper
given the effort involved I'd rather spend extra to never have to do this for another 100k miles
 

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Banned
2005 Mercedes S500 Designo with ABC
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144 Posts
I am getting ready to do the motor mounts in the non 4 matic S500 with standard air suspension.

Has the forum discovered any added tricks, tips or shortcuts to this tricky repair?

Is it done best with jack stands or ramps? One would have weight on suspension and one would just have
suspension hanging down. Does it matter?

Yes I got the weird 16mm wrench in advance and ordered Lemforder parts although other brands were MUCH cheaper
given the effort involved I'd rather spend extra to never have to do this for another 100k miles
Just be careful raising the car. You’re going to apply a lot of force lifting the engine and moving things around.
 

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Premium Member
2006 S500 (W220, Designo Espresso, AMG Sport, LWB)
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388 Posts
I'm going to be doing this as well. While reading up and searching for the needed tools, I found this How-To write up:
http://www.mercedesmedic.com/diy-engine-mount-replacement-with-pictures-video-mercedes-benz/
Haven't read through it all yet, but there appears to be plenty of photos.
As I need to also replace the driver's side valve cover gasket, I'll likely postpone that job to coincide with the motor mount replacement.
By the way, what's the deal with so many people wanting to use floor ramps instead of jack stands? Especially when doing under the vehicle work on difficult to reach stuff? I'd rather pop the wheels off and get them out of my way. Floor ramps, while convenient, have always been a huge space-hog of a tool in my experiences. I pretty much quit using them back in the early '90s, unless I NEED to keep the wheels/suspension supported, like when doing an alignment. Just my 2 pence.
 

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Registered
2005 S500 with amg package
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92 Posts
For people thinking about replacing your engine mounts, Pep Boys have engine mounts on sale, i assume it's a black Friday thing for $35.09 each with a lifetime warranty.


only 4 customer reviews but they are all 5 stars and you get a lifetime warranty so you are covered for a long while.

Gareth
 

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2005 S500 with amg package
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92 Posts
I replaced the motor and trans mounts today, using the pepboys engine mounts. the old mounts were shot, the drivers/left side was really bad. The car has 107k miles and I was surprised at there condition. My daughter had a hyundai XG350L and the mounts lasted to 130k and my Toyota Tacoma (we tow a trailer with the toyota) has 140K and its still on the original mounts. I used the procedure laid out in the first posting and it is tight getting the new mounts in but it can be done. I would recommend buying the tool before attempting the job.
2005 S500
 

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Outstanding Contributor , SDS Guru
1998 MB E300TD, 1997 MB E36 AMG, 2001 MB E55 AMG
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3,405 Posts
lol, please don't buy the pepboy motor mounts unless you're selling the car soon, or don't mind doing the job within next 6 to 12 months.

Stick to Febi or Lemforder for motor mounts, and enjoy another 10 years of reliability.
 

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2000 S430, 2003 S430, 2000 S500, 2003 S600 TT, and 2005 E320 CDI
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4,488 Posts
Looks like it's time for me to do this to the wife's 2000 S500. Will let you know how it goes. I already have a set of Lemfoerder mounts, made in Germany.
 

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2003 S500
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2,479 Posts
I just completed this on the 2003 S500. A slow and frustrating job, but very doable.

When you are dropping and replacing the steering rack, using a flex-head ratchet wrench thru the slots in the aluminum chassis plate to hold the loose nuts on the inside was much easier and faster than trying to use a deep-well socket. Flex-head ratchet wrenches are your friend at several stages of the projects. I suggest that you NOT use (and never buy) the wrenches that you have to turn over to reverse. It only takes one time of trapping a wrench to show you why.

The rubber boots are a real PITA, but you do need them on as a heat shield.

Be very certain that you get the tab on the mounts correctly inserted in the slots in the support plate. It is a pain to redo that part of the installation...
 
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