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1989 560SL
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156 Posts
The large plug on the passenger side is where a block heater was fitted if so requested.


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1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #762
Got the sealant for the rear cover... now all I have to do is figure out which surfaces I should coat.

I assume all the surfaces indicated by the red arrows get coated but should I also coat the surfaces indicated by the blue arrows?

MercRearCover copy.jpg
 

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1979 450SL UK spec
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1,606 Posts
I don't know for sure but would assume all the machined surfaces.

However, isn't it time to strip the engine again to port and polish the heads.;)
 

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1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #765
I don't know for sure but would assume all the machined surfaces.

However, isn't it time to strip the engine again to port and polish the heads.;)
Port and polish the heads on a 380 would be a waste of polish. No amount of polishing could ever make up for the fact that the air has to make a 180 degree turn inside the lower plenum on its way to the polished ports. What were they thinking? o_O
 

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1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #766
Mercedes Service Manual states that before inserting the rear oil seal you need to coat some portion of it with "long life grease". What the hell is long life grease?

Here is what the manual says...
Step 4: Fill radial sealing ring space between dust lip and sealing lip with long-life grease according to sheet 266.2 of the Specifications for Service Products.

And another question:
There appears to be some kind of adhesive that was used on the inside of the mounting surface of the rear cover for the sealing ring. In the picture below you can see it as a green residue left behind after I removed the old seal. Does anyone know what that green residue is?

MercRearCoverGreenStuff copy.jpg
 

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1985 380 SL
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144 Posts
Mercedes Service Manual states that before inserting the rear oil seal you need to coat some portion of it with "long life grease". What the hell is long life grease?

Here is what the manual says...
Step 4: Fill radial sealing ring space between dust lip and sealing lip with long-life grease according to sheet 266.2 of the Specifications for Service Products.

And another question:
There appears to be some kind of adhesive that was used on the inside of the mounting surface of the rear cover for the sealing ring. In the picture below you can see it as a green residue left behind after I removed the old seal. Does anyone know what that green residue is?

View attachment 2650099
The green residue looks like leftover sealer paint that was pre-applied to the metal seal body by the seal manufacturer. Does the new seal have a rubber coating on the outside, or is it metal?
 

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1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #769
The green residue looks like leftover sealer paint that was pre-applied to the metal seal body by the seal manufacturer. Does the new seal have a rubber coating on the outside, or is it metal?
The new seal has rubber.
Thanks
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #770 (Edited)
Maybe?


  • MB 266.2 Langzeitschmierfett A 001 989 88 51-
  • Shell Stamina 0233B
Thank you so much. I'll order the Shell equivalent.

Update: I couldn't find the Shell Stamina 0233B anyplace so I ordered a Mobile equivalent, but after doing much searching, it looks like it's nothing more than a very thick long lasting grease that won't wash out. I could probably use axle grease.
 

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1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #773 (Edited)
Finally finished installing the back plate... what a PITA. It was almost impossible to position the plate on the engine with the engine mounted to the engine stand so rather than trying to maneuver the back plate between the engine stand mounting arms, which would result in the sealing compound getting places I didn't want it to get, I decided to hang the engine on the hoist and remove the stand. With the engine off the engine stand I would get to insert the back plate directly on the back of the engine and get unobstructed access to the 13 bolts used to attach the rear plate.

In a stroke of bitter irony... my Harbor Freight hoist is close to useless when attempting to lift an engine mounted on my Harbor Freight engine stand. Wouldn't you think a Harbor Freight hoist would accommodate the legs of a Harbor Freight engine stand... well think again, they just won't work together and it doesn't help that the Harbor Freight engine stand has fixed casters in the front, which makes turning it in tight places a bit of a challenge (not to mention the extra years in Purgatory for the deleted expletives I used to describe my lack of enthusiasm for the engineers that designed incompatible pieces of equipment that by definition must work together).

Once the back plate was on, next came the oil pan. 28 bolts, 24 of which are socket head and 14 of them are in places where it's nearly impossible to get an Allen socket straight on so you need to use those special Allen sockets that swivel inside the Allen head. What a joy. Would it have killed them to use hex heads?

It's been a slow and painful process but it's starting to look like an engine.

MercRebuildProgress.jpg
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #775
It's looking good. You should still have some top down driving weather when you're finished.
I don't dare let myself think that anymore. Every time I think I've got the rebuild on an even keel something comes up that bites me in the (insert body part of preference).
Next up... intake manifold and plenum. 🤞

p.s. I stopped cleaning and plating hardware, nuts and bolts, it just takes too long. McMaster delivers in 2 days, the same amount of time but much less effort. :)
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #777
I've just been looking at which stand to buy and came across this video, so will avoid this type.

The engine stand in the video is exactly the same as my Harbor Freight engine stand and although the hoist is different, the problem is the same. The legs of the engine stand and the legs of the hoist interfere with each other and you can't get the stand far enough into the space between the legs of the hoist to be able to lift the engine off the stand (or put it on the stand for that matter).

The guys solution in the video was clever but time consuming and requires a welder... not a piece of equipment everyone has. My solution cost a few bucks but didn't involve welding and grinding... I used my load leveler to extend the center of lift of the hoist. The load leveler is a must for lifting engines out of the engine bay anyway so I killed two birds with one stone (without actually knowing it when I bought the load leveler).

The load leveler comes with an adjustment that alters the center of lift of the hoist. I simply adjusted the leveler all the way forward which gave me just enough room to be able to lift the engine, with the stand attached, while just barely clearing the leg interference. It will lift unevenly but it takes enough load off the engine stand to maneuver it around the legs for removal or insertion.
The arrows in the picture show that the center of lift of the hoist arm has been moved forward 7", just enough to clear the leg interference. (The hand brake in the picture is there just to hold the leveler level for taking the picture).

MercHoistLoadLeveler copy.jpg
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #778
I've just been looking at which stand to buy and came across this video, so will avoid this type.

I forgot to mention... don't buy a 3 point engine stand, especially for a M116 of M117 engine. When fully assembled on the stand these engines are massive in size (if not in weight) and the 3 point stand will be unstable when turning the engine over to get at the bottom. Definitely buy the 4 point stand like in the video but just be aware that there will be leg interference that you must resolve either by using a load leveler or modifications like in the video.

Also... the Harbor Freight hoist comes with steel wheels on the legs that are rather tall and the legs are wide (40 1/2" at their widest point) which is enough to cause you problems getting them under a 107. My solution was to lift the car slightly with my lift and that enabled me to get the legs of the hoist under the car. I suppose you could accomplish the same thing with a pump jack or two.

And don't forget those park bench front bumpers if you've got them. The hoist arm is just barely long enough at its full extension to reach the center of lift on the engine because that bumper sticks out so far. If you've got the US bumpers you must take that length into consideration when buying a hoist (or remove the bumper). I made up the difference with the load leveler.
 

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1979 450SL UK spec
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1,606 Posts
This is the one I'm looking at, rated for 680Kg.

2650464


Its double the price of the cheap ones but will give more peace of mind.


My existing crane and leveler were fine last time.
2650465


2650466
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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3,194 Posts
Discussion Starter #780
This is the one I'm looking at, rated for 680Kg.

View attachment 2650464

Its double the price of the cheap ones but will give more peace of mind.


My existing crane and leveler were fine last time.
View attachment 2650465

View attachment 2650466
 
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