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My mog project finally got rolling over the weekend, the engine is getting sorted out finally. Had to fab up some carb gaskets as the red rtv used before was just gummy mess now. A rebuilt mechanical pump from Exp Imp solved the fuel pressure/leaking into the oil problem, and a set of new plugs was enough to get it running, although the cam/valves are either worn from running the oil/fuel mixture or in bad need of adjustment.
Just in time to discover the next issue; brake problems. It has a crushed left rear hard line from a towing hook, not leaking but less than round. Also had virtually no fluid from the master up to the reservoir. After some bleeding, and monkeying around I got brake pressure, but way too much grab and almost no pedal travel. One of the rear wheels just seems to lock and slide, even on pavement. SO the next move is to reline the shoes and turn or replace the drums. Anyone have any thoughts on approaches to this? Is relining acceptable, can the drums be turned if they have enough meat left?

Here's few pics of the carb gaskets I cut before final trimming, not the neatest job but working. The gloves are kevlar, from my work, awesome mechanics' gloves. "Atlas Dyneema". You can literally saw at them with a knife and no cuts.



And one of the whole thing just to show it off!
 

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They can be relined, I had mine done here in Phila, cost $40 a pair I think. If one is locking up it sounds like a cylinder or hardware failure though. PM me if you need the shop that did the work.
 

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For the best job get the brakes relined and arced to the drums. A good truck brake shop can rivet on new linings and then cut them to the arc of your drum. Before buying linings rivets and drums take your old stuff to the brake shop and see if they can fix you up. It must be a place that relines brakes, not just a mechanic shop. We have a great one here in Rochester, NY Von and I use.
 

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Check also the rubber 'flex' lines on wear. They give much trouble when old. The rubber inside will swollen and block the 'pressure less' retour of oil back from the cilinder.

For the linings, some have the linings glued instead of rivetted. When done right it would be much stronger.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For the best job get the brakes relined and arced to the drums. A good truck brake shop can rivet on new linings and then cut them to the arc of your drum. Before buying linings rivets and drums take your old stuff to the brake shop and see if they can fix you up. It must be a place that relines brakes, not just a mechanic shop. We have a great one here in Rochester, NY Von and I use.
THe mog up on blocks while pull the wheels off ought to make my neighbors happy! The nearest real truck shop is a good 45 minutes by car, I'm not sure I'd trust the mog to make it that far yet. Hate to see it up on blocks.
 

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You just need to take the shoes and drums. Make sure the shop is capable of riveting on new linings and that they have some that will work. You can order the pads and rivets from your favorite Mog dealer also, but a good brake shop can just make them up. Also don't forget to see if they can arc the shoes to the drum. As for bonded or riveted brake shoes, I think that in these trucks they are always riveted. I don't think you can get bonded shoes. Your drums will have a max. dia. stamped on them. Your competent brake shop can tell you if they can be turned. It is also a good time to cleanup your brake cylinders and put new cups and seals in them. You can probably give them a quick honing while still mounted on the truck, depending on how bad they are rusted.
 

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Here's few pics of the carb gaskets I cut before final trimming, not the neatest job but working. The gloves are kevlar, from my work, awesome mechanics' gloves. "Atlas Dyneema". You can literally saw at them with a knife and no cuts.

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Thanks for the tip on the gloves. How puncture resistant are they, do your hands sweat a lot in those glovers, how well do they fit?

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the tip on the gloves. How puncture resistant are they, do your hands sweat a lot in those glovers, how well do they fit?

Martin
Fit on the gloves is fine, I use them all day for work. You lose some fine tactile sensation, but I've gotten used to them. Grip is enhanced due to the rubbery coating on the palm side. They stink horribly when wet for some reason. They aren't too hot, the kevlar weave is breathable. Outside, in the wind, they are actually really cold. they are not really meant to stop punctures, just cuts.
If you Google "atlas gloves" or "kevlar gloves" you'll find some that are better at puncture resistance. But thickness and prices rise with toughness. If you are doing body work, as your nickname suggests, these gloves will save you from most of those nasty little sheet metal cuts.
 
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