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1981 240D
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently used the following how-to to replace my rear wheel bearings.

http://www.peachparts.com/Wikka/W123RearWheelBearings

I started with the passenger side and broke the hub, so I have only completed this job on the driver's side, but I wanted to post a few comments regarding my experience so others can have a smoother job. I posted a seperate thread on using the dial indicator to measure rear hub endplay, since I am not exactly sure how to do it. So this is what I have so far:

1. I jacked up the rear end and removed the wheels.
2. I removed the brake calipers with the hoses completely from the vehicle (I am doing a complete rear-end rebuild and plan to replace the hoses and rebuild the calipers).
3. I removed the brake rotors (I will be replacing them as well).
4. I removed the emergency brake shoes and springs (also being replaced, but even if you are not going to replace them, I destroyed the old ones in a later step).
5. I removed the axle bolt and washer.
6. I removed the axle from the hub.
7. Since I am replacing the rotors anyway, I used an old rotor to remove the wheel hub from the wheel carrier. I put the rotor on backwards, so I could have some swinging room for my hammer.
8. I removed the castle nut from under the car as described in the peachparts how-to.
9. I pried out the inner seals with a screwdriver, as described in the how-to.
10. From under the car, I used a 5 pound ball-peen hammer to strike the rotor until the hub came out. (IMPORTANT: The peachparts how-to says that he used a drift and hammer to strike the hub from the inside, driving it out the other side, which I did resulting in a deformed and unuseable hub that needs to be replaced at a cost of about $350. I would recommend striking only the rotor. You will probably damage the rotor, but they are much less expensive to replace than hubs).
11. Once the hub is out, you will need to get the larger outter bearing off. This is quite a task, but I actually got them off fairly easy using a pickle fork. I put the two points of the pickle fork in between the hub and the actual bearing and struck it with the ball peen hammer. It helps if you put the hub in a vice. Once it is out about a half inch, you can get in there with a three jaw puller and it comes right off smoothly.
12. I tapped the new bearing on, as described in the peachparts how-to.
13. I reassembled the hub as described in the how-to.
14. I know it says the hub only takes 50g of grease, but I PACK it in there until it oozes out everywhere. When I put the smaller inner bearing in, I used a 55mm socket and rubber mallet to seat the bearing so I could thread the new castle nut onto the hub.

I know this is a lot of redundant information and it is probably obvious to most of you, but if I can save one person from having to buy a new hub, it is worth my time. Too much information is better than not enough.
 

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1984 300D
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Unfortunately when someone does a write-up they are only speaking of their experience on that one particular Job. If the job goes easily for them it makes you think that when you do the same job it is it is going to be the same for you.

So the guy in the Peach parts write-up was able to use the Brass Drift/Punch to move his Hub 1/2" and then he beat it out the rest of the way by hitting the Rotor installed backwards.
You had no trouble getting your Axle out of the Hub. I have read on Thread where the shaft of the Axle was rusted to the Hub and it took several hours for the guy to get it out.
Of course Mercedes has an extensive set of special tools to deal with all of that but when you do the job yourself you are at a disadvantage.

A more recent thread I read where on a 617.952 Engine a guy busted his Glow Plugs because the little 8mm nuts were rusted on. He tried hard not to do that but I do not think he had a choice but to keep turning until the sheared of the threaded part.
He was also shocked because none of the write-ups He had read gave him any hit he was going to have that trouble. And, in 3 years of reading the various Forums I have not read of 1 person that had the problem he had. (Another reason why these forums are important!)

So you did the right thing by starting this thread so people will not use a Punch/Drift to beat out the Hub.

I worked as a Diesel Mechanic for a total of 18 years and there are times when even with all of the correct tools, information and even Training; Myself and Others I worked with have destroyed parts getting them off.
 

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1981 240D
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Unfortunately when someone does a write-up they are only speaking of their experience on that one particular Job. If the job goes easily for them it makes you think that when you do the same job it is it is going to be the same for you.
300Dman: You are absolutely right. I should caveat my original thread by saying: the peachparts how-to was a lifesaver. It helped me a ton and I would still recommend people use this guy's write up, with the exception of hitting the actual threaded end of the hub. Also, the peachparts guy said he had a hell of a time removing the outter bearing using a chisel. I also had a hell of a time initially, so I tried using the pickle fork, which worked excellent. These are just notes from my own experience and should in no way be construed as me saying that I am smarter than anyone. I just don't want people to have to pay for something they don't need to. The objected of DIY is to save money, so turning a $75 job into a $400 job is senseless.
 

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300Dman: You are absolutely right. I should caveat my original thread by saying: the peachparts how-to was a lifesaver. It helped me a ton and I would still recommend people use this guy's write up, with the exception of hitting the actual threaded end of the hub. Also, the peachparts guy said he had a hell of a time removing the outter bearing using a chisel. I also had a hell of a time initially, so I tried using the pickle fork, which worked excellent. These are just notes from my own experience and should in no way be construed as me saying that I am smarter than anyone. I just don't want people to have to pay for something they don't need to. The objected of DIY is to save money, so turning a $75 job into a $400 job is senseless.
I am going to comment on being "Smarter" first. Different people do come up with better ways of doing things and sometimes they are Smarter. But, like most Humans we do Smarter things sometimes and Dumber things other times (I hope I am not speaking of Myself on this one).

As for the part I highlighted in Red you made a decision to buy a New Part. You could have had a Junk Yard remove a good used Part for you and saved considerable Money.
I suspect you just wanted the job over with or were pressed for time to get the car on the road.

General thoughts:
I had a complete Rear Trailing Arm shipped to me at a total cost (including shipping) of $150 From a Junk Yard (in the same State I live in). I could have bough a new one which at the time was in the $1200-$1400 range not including the shipping charge.
And, the used Trailing Arm was complete; Hub and Bearings assembled.

In fact the Hub on the cracked Trailing Arm I removed is still good. Sometimes when folks need parts they ask the fourm Members if they have any extras.

In general any DIY job has a certain amout of risk to it that can increase the cost of the job. The reason for that is you are teaching yourself how to do the job.
 

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1984 300D
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And the funny part is, that after teaching yourself the job and successfully completing it, you will probably never do it again. But your confidence level increases for the next one time repair.
 

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1984 300D
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And the funny part is, that after teaching yourself the job and successfully completing it, you will probably never do it again. But your confidence level increases for the next one time repair.
Most often you can use the knowledge (including the mistakes) you leaned from one job on something else. That is one of the payoffs for doing it yourself.
 

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1981 240D
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
300Dman: Actually, I think I have OCD. When it comes to replacement parts I hate using used parts. I have used junkyard parts in the past without any issues, but I don't like to. In my area there are only two junkyards and they only have a couple 240D's between the two. They make you take off your own parts and they charge you 85% what the part costs new. I live in the desert and I really don't feel like getting stung by a scorpion or bit by a rattlesnake while I am under a car held up by cinder blocks or other cars. I would rather pay a little more and have a part I know is good. Just my personal opinion.

slcturbo: actually, this is the second time I have done this job. I used the same how-to on the last car. The first car I did this job on was a 1983 300SD and it was much easier. On this car, the grease is pretty much dried up and parts did not move freely. It is not really a hard job, just something you have to take your time with and keep your parts clean and organized. Like I said before, the peachparts how-to I am referring to is a great write up, I just failed to apply some common sense.
 

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I am replacing right rear wheel bearing on my Mercedes 300d.....No brass drift is moving the axle out of the hub so that I can proceed with rest of procedure.I fitted carefully appropriate sized deep socket (1/2 drive) and have hit with 2lb hammer quite severely without movement...Any better ideas to push axle thru hub?.. I've never seen one stuck so thouroughly.
 

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If someone has not already mentioned it don't follow this procedure " I Used a brass drift to hammer out the hub from under the car". That end of the Hub is very thin and easily damaged and a punch can expand it so that it cannot be easily pulled though the ID of inner Bearing.
 

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78 300d

If someone has not already mentioned it don't follow this procedure " I Used a brass drift to hammer out the hub from under the car". That end of the Hub is very thin and easily damaged and a punch can expand it so that it cannot be easily pulled though the ID of inner Bearing.
I'm referring to removing the axle spline inward from the hub... It doesn't want to move..
 

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85 300TD, 80 300SD
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Does anyone have a source for the slotted axle nut? I have a rear wheel bearing kit missing the nut. W123 300TD, thanks
 
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