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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I replacing my brakes and rotors. Ive already replaced my anti rattle plastic piece like 12,000miles ago. and well... to poor to buy new calipers, which I'm thinking they dont need replcing anyways. anything else im missing in which i can do in my weekend of rear brake fixing?
 

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money pits of various forms
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I replacing my brakes and rotors. Ive already replaced my anti rattle plastic piece like 12,000miles ago. and well... to poor to buy new calipers, which I'm thinking they dont need replcing anyways. anything else im missing in which i can do in my weekend of rear brake fixing?
Well as long as you got the rear end up you might as well do the diff fluid if you havent before.
 

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i changed that when my axle went to crap. how often should that be changed?
According to the Chilton manual:

"The rear axle need not be drained regularly..."

I guess if your oil is original then change it. But you said that you changed the axle and put new oil in, so you probably shouldn't need to change it. But you can certainly check the fluid level while down there.
 

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1982 300CD
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Open the fill hole and fill it. (You can't overfill.)

While you're doing the rear brakes, bleed the lines.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
bleeding the brakes seems like a scary task to me....am i overacting? I havnt done a forum search on this but i will after this post. if you have a good pictorial id appeciate it. Thanks.
 

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p100, typed up a good DIY guide alittle while back.
 

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1959 220S cabriolet, 1983 240D original owner, 1999 E300 turbo diesel, 1988 560SL, 2003 SLK320
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Bleeding the brakes is supposed to be an annual thing on the 123 chassis. If you don't do it, chances are excellent that you are going to have to be buying the more expensive components in your brake system at some point.

Also, check your rubber brake hoses. There is a date code on them. I'd say if they are over 10 to 12 years old that you should replace them.

Differential can be over filled if it's done with the rear end jacked up.

Len
 

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1985 300CD
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Bleeding the brakes and flushing the system is a joy with a pressure bleeder.

I got the EUROPEAN POWER BLEEDER from Motive Products for $49.95.

Products Bleeders

Just have a turkey baster/syringe to remove the excess fluid from the reservoir when you're done bleeding/flushing.:cool:

Also it's best to bleed from the farthest point and work toward the MC.
Right Rear, Left Rear, Right Front, Left Front.
 

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Bleeding the brakes and flushing the system is a joy with a pressure bleeder.

I got the EUROPEAN POWER BLEEDER from Motive Products for $49.95.

Products Bleeders

Just have a turkey baster/syringe to remove the excess fluid from the reservoir when you're done bleeding/flushing.:cool:

Also it's best to bleed from the farthest point and work toward the MC.
Right Rear, Left Rear, Right Front, Left Front.
And, use the syringe to remove the fluid from the reservoir, then refill with fresh before you start.

I have a pressure bleeder (mityvac thing, not the TANK), but I still like to have the assistant pumping the pedal for me.
Call me old fashioned.
 

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And, use the syringe to remove the fluid from the reservoir, then refill with fresh before you start.

I have a pressure bleeder (mityvac thing, not the TANK), but I still like to have the assistant pumping the pedal for me.
Call me old fashioned.
Good point, don't try to push all that old fluid through the lines.:D

I tried using my MityVac to do a vac bleed at the bleeder screws and it just kept pulling air past the threads.:( I would prefer an assistant pumping the pedal over that method. The pressure bleeder makes it a quick and easy one man job. Plus, you don't have to watch the reservoir level since you can put over 1.5 liters of fluid in the tank of the bleeder. You just need to keep the tank pumped to 15 psi.
 
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