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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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6,795 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Whats going on? Are our Mercedes R107s being funneled into Restoration Shops?
Check out YouTube and note the date of these videos.
Some of the worst examples are getting expensive restorations - some I would have only thought of as "parts cars".

 

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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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6,795 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
 

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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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6,795 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This rusty POS was a labor of love:

 

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'79 450SL, '04 CLK200 convertible; former A124, W210, A209.
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1,544 Posts
Well, the earliest SL will be 50 next year which is quite remarkable if you think about it. There's defo a high demand for all things SL, price wise 107 may not follow the same trajectory as Pagoda but its certainly climbing the stairs.

The last clip you posted belongs to RaceDiagnostics whom you might have met here on the forum, and the work he pulled off is nothing short of a miracle even if he is a one man army. ??
 

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1983 380 SL
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2,652 Posts
Well, the earliest SL will be 50 next year which is quite remarkable if you think about it. There's defo a high demand for all things SL, price wise 107 may not follow the same trajectory as Pagoda but its certainly climbing the stairs.

The last clip you posted belongs to RaceDiagnostics whom you might have met here on the forum, and the work he pulled off is nothing short of a miracle even if he is a one man army. ??
Every time I watch the video of what RaceDiagnostics did I get amazed all over again.
 

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w108 & w107
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125 Posts
Considering what is happening in Australia (see result below from last night's auction in Sydney), there will come a time when salvaging a rusty 107 will be worthwhile...

FYI at current exchange rates, that's about USD $50k...

2621066
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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6,795 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Every time I watch the video of what RaceDiagnostics did I get amazed all over again.
I agree that was impressive work.
I wish I had that level skills.
 

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Registered
1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
Joined
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6,795 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
One takeaway I noted is that I'm guessing there is a pickup in interest and demand for our R107s witnessed by the restoration activities on the poorer condition examples. Perhaps in a few years cars I considered as only for parts will be increasingly sought after for restorations.

I had the impression that it is much less costly to pay more for a nicely maintained R107 as starting point for restoration than what I am seeing going through major renovation. I even note that SL Shop is restoring R107s with rusted out firewall bulkheads. Maybe we are truely witnessing valuation heading sharply upward?
 

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1985 280SL (Euro)
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221 Posts
I have to wonder why anyone would pick a badly rusted example to restore when there is a plethora of 107's available with much lower levels of deterioration. Surely these would be better candidates for renewal.The level of financial commitment needed to restore any badly rusted car is at the very least substantial and most restorations are not carried out as charitable works. A profit from eventual sale or at least a major increase in equity is usually the motivation for restoration activities. I just wish I had the faith of these 107 restorers that their efforts would be financially worthwhile.
 

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1983 380 SL
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2,652 Posts
I have to wonder why anyone would pick a badly rusted example to restore when there is a plethora of 107's available with much lower levels of deterioration. Surely these would be better candidates for renewal.The level of financial commitment needed to restore any badly rusted car is at the very least substantial and most restorations are not carried out as charitable works. A profit from eventual sale or at least a major increase in equity is usually the motivation for restoration activities. I just wish I had the faith of these 107 restorers that their efforts would be financially worthwhile.
Why do people climb mountains, jump off cliffs, scuba dive in caves? :unsure:
 

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1983 380 SL
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2,652 Posts
You have a point Jyuma, but how many car restorers have a death wish?
I don't know if thrill seekers have a death wish or not, but taking on a badly rusted 107 for restoration might be considered a financial death wish. I'm restoring my '83 107 that I bought new 36 years ago and I can attest to the fact that I have many thousands of dollars more invested in the restoration than the car is worth in today's market. I'm either nuts or in love with the process. Maybe both. :unsure:
 

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I don't know if thrill seekers have a death wish or not, but taking on a badly rusted 107 for restoration might be considered a financial death wish. I'm restoring my '83 107 that I bought new 36 years ago and I can attest to the fact that I have many thousands of dollars more invested in the restoration than the car is worth in today's market. I'm either nuts or in love with the process. Maybe both. :unsure:
I agree completely. Looking at it from a financial position, it's maybe not worth it (at current car values) at the moment. But, if your car has sentimental value to you, and money and/or time is not such a big deal, then I think a project like that is good for the mind and soul. Although some may see me as stoopid for doing what I do, without my little car projects, I'd definitely be in a mental institution by now... we all need a purpose in life to wake up for, and for me at the moment, without the cars, it's work work work..
I've loved reading the thread re taking off your heads Jyuma (although, unless I missed it, I'm still waiting for an explanation re the plating station....), not because I'm going to do the job myself, but I suppose we all feel what you're going through, which is why people start these death-wish restorations in the first place.
 

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1985 280SL (Euro)
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221 Posts
Ah! That explains a lot. Where sentiment is involved,common sense goes out of the window. Several years ago I spent a fortune ( certainly more than I could ever hope to recover) restoring a Buick Le Sabre convertible I'd had from new and cracked up well over 200,000 miles on. On the first major trip I took following completion of this now gorgeous car I was sideswiped by a red light runner in the Catskills. Somehow I could never feel the same about the car after it was fixed but for all of 4 weeks I was a happy camper.
 

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Premium Member
1983 380 SL
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2,652 Posts
I agree completely. Looking at it from a financial position, it's maybe not worth it (at current car values) at the moment. But, if your car has sentimental value to you, and money and/or time is not such a big deal, then I think a project like that is good for the mind and soul. Although some may see me as stoopid for doing what I do, without my little car projects, I'd definitely be in a mental institution by now... we all need a purpose in life to wake up for, and for me at the moment, without the cars, it's work work work..
I've loved reading the thread re taking off your heads Jyuma (although, unless I missed it, I'm still waiting for an explanation re the plating station....), not because I'm going to do the job myself, but I suppose we all feel what you're going through, which is why people start these death-wish restorations in the first place.
I forgot all about the plating station. I'll take some pictures and post the story when I get home from work.
Yes, I'm well into my seventies and I still hold down a job.
 
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