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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok, I just did it for one side and will be repeating for the other tomorrow. It took awhile to figure out how to do the associated things like removing the p-brake shoes, re-positioning the spring link, but all in all it went quite smooth. I know I can do this using html tags but after working more than 1/2 day on this my brain is in reptilian mode so bear with me.

First image is of the p-brake removed and the brake shield moved forward on the wheel carrier. You want to do this for obvious reasons as well as checking the condition of the p-brake pads if they have never been checked before. Mine were covered in brake dust and fine oxidation. Perfect opportunity to clean them. Removing the p-brake was a chore. The first two springs float the p-brake shoes and are positioned on the center of each shoe.. They can be removed with a philips head screwdriver that has a flaring head. The last spring (111) I used a pick I got from Carquest. Its shaped like a Kris on the end and was very useful for both removal AND replacement of the troublesome spring. Pretty much the only tool you need to do it in a somewhat relaxed manner.

With the brake shield loosened you can rotate it freely so the caliper aperture aligns perfectly with the bushing fasteners making it easy to position the tool, work from the outside of the car instead of underneath it and have alot more room to get a fuller range of motion with a breaker bar/ ratchet that you will need.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Next images show the condition of the spring link bushing after 20 yrs of TX summers. You can see that the bushing is already looking sad before it even comes out of the carrier.

The replacement bushings are not too expensive but there are two. The Febi's and the Lemfoerders. Go a little more for the Lemfoerder product. I was told that they used a more durable vulcanized rubber for the protective boot that resists tearing better than the OE bushings. The Febis looked like the original bushings and they will probably last awhile but you have to ask yourself how often do you want to do this repair? The difference in price you pay is for peace of mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I used the Baum Tool special tool to do the job. I don't know about the MB factory tool but I was very impressed with the precision of the Baum. Still, its not idiotproof.

You have to pay attention to details! Proper positioning of the reciever is the key. You have to make sure the bushing shell does not contact the reciever otherwise you will likely mangle something (the tool or your carrier). Also, position the press end so it goes into the eye on the other end without contacting the carrier. Its a smaller diameter compared to the bushing shell. You don't want to mangle the metal on the carrier.

With the old bushing out (you can use a ratchet but I chose to do it with a breaker bar + 27 mm deep socket) you can see how messed up it is.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Here the old bushing is in the removal position of the tool configuration. It actually goes into the reciever and the whole affair comes out towards the rear so pay attention that it doesn't drop off the socket! (particularily if you are renting the tool from another forum member!). Comparing the old vs new its obvious 20 yrs is beyond the service life of these items.
 

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Wow, wasted! Looks like a lot of fun. Not.

A couple of weeks ago I changed the rear subframe forward bushings on my 88 TE #2. That was such a nasty job I'm still too traumatized to start a thread on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The carrier eye was suprisingly clean with very little oxidation. Still, I hosed it down with Deep Creep, scoured it with a scotchbrite pad, and got it squeaky clean with brake cleaner. Its important to get the lip of the carrier eye clean as well since you don't want to be drawing in any grit when you press in the new bushing.

Use a little high-temperature anti-sieze in the eye.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Now getting ready to press in the new bushing. Clean the outside of it with brake cleaner to remove any oils (I know, I'm paranoid!). Position the tool to pull the new bushing from rear-to-front.

The forward half of the press has a slice which allows a visual reference for centering the bushing into the carrier. This is important! DO NOT ASSUME THE TOOL WILL CENTER THE BUSHING!. The pushing part of the tool is beveled to match the bevel at the rearward side of the eye but you have to do a visual reference to make sure you don't over-drive the bushing. The last thing you want to do is reverse the tool configuration to pull it in the other direction because you were stupid and/or over-zealous.

With the new bushing centered in the eye it is now time to fasten the carrier to the spring link again. This step gave me alot of grief. I didn't realize that the bushing is actually pre-loaded and when you use a jack on the spring link it doesn't want to naturally align with the carrier eye. I solved it but must warn you that my solution only works for jacks with the rubber relief sections. You have to position the floor jack with the handle pointing forward (wrt the car). As you are jacking up you twist the jack arcing it towards the rearward direction wrt the car. This has the effect of pre-loading the inner spring link bushing an properly aligning the link with the carrier. Again, this will only work with a jack that has the rubber relief as you need alot of friction between the jack and spring link to pre-load the inner bushing.

With the bushing and link aligned drive in the bolt using a suitable drift and hammer (unless you get a perfect alignment you will need a little force), and tighten to 150 nm with a little Loctite Blue since the self-locking nut is obviously NOT self locking after re-use.

GO NUTS!

Any questions, clarifications, need more picts, I am happy to oblige.

Now... to the DIY section!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just finished the 2nd side. It went alot smoother this time now that I know all the tricks (paid my dues). From start to finish I estimate 1.5 hrs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So one thing I noticed when I was doing the 2nd side was that removal of the old bushing and insertion of the new bushing required a little more force on the breaker bar. In fact, you could hear some groaning as the new bushing went in.

This may be due to the fact that the two wheel carriers (right, left) might have minute differences in the tolerances coming from the parts suppliers. The folks who were doing the passenger side carrier have the tigher tolerances and the folks doing the driver's side were snoozing on the job.
 

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Wow, great thread. I'm actually doing mine but sadly I don't have the baum tool, so I'm trying other ways, more primitive I might say to put that bushing back in... It was easy to take it out, I just cut it with a jigsaw. Again nice thread...
 

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Resurrecting and old thread I know --- but the Baum tool you used looks suspiciously like the rear diff bushing tool I have - is it the same?
 
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