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Discussion Starter #1
so i had the rear wheel off and it looks like i just have to remove two bolts to pull the caliper off the axle to get access to the pads. True?

I'm not going to bother with the pads with sensors, just normal pads. My damn car is constantly telling me to take my car to the workshop and i already new i was coming up on the time to change them before getting the message and i know i still have some pad left so the WARNING!!!! is particularly annoying and i'd rather never see it again.

Anyway, thanks ahead of time for the response...
 

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Eric,
I have not seen the rear calipers of a 463 but I have not encountered a Mercedes product that required the removal of a caliper to change the pads. They should come out the end away from the rotor and are normally held in place by a couple of pins. I may be wrong but I doubt it is neccessary to remove the rotor. There may be a cap on the outside of the rotor. Take it off and see what is in there.
I personally would use the rotor sensors. They give warning way before the danger zone of pad wear. Rears get ignored because they wear about 1/3 of the rate of the fronts. I like to change out pads around 50% or so to avoid problems with the caliper pistons. The farther out the pistons travel the more vulnerable they are to seizing in the bore due to scoring, dirt or corrosion. Pads are a bit less expensive than a pair of rotors and calipers when a piston seizes. Annual bleeding to exchange the brake fluid helps to evacuate the water that is drawn to the brake fluid and keeps the boiling point of the fluid high.

-Dai
 

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Change brake fluid.
Couldnt agree more with Dai, brake fluid is very hydroponic and its the moisture content that leads to cavitation.
My off road vehicle has a fluid change after every wet event.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dai, i'm due for a brake bleed... that's in the plans though i probably wont do it myself. GIven that the rotor is nearly a half in thick i wonder what the minimum rotor spec is because if you add up 10% on the pads with a .25" rotor those poor pistons really have to move.

50% on the pads for replacement?... I'll probably pray california weather keeps me from needing to take that measure. Considering how long pads last me (100k miles on the pathfinder) i think i can count on the folks rotating my tires to warn me in fair time if i don't see it my self since it works out to about 5% change per-rotation. Wait a minute, if i changed them at 50% there'd really be no since in having sensors. ALthough, if i was the kind of person that eats brakes pretty quick (or even at an average rate) i would probably want sensors.

Harald, thanks for the info and the torque bolt spec... oh and i got the ABS kill switch face.
 

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Eric, sorry I didn't get the pad replacement right. I apparently work on OLD MB stuff.
Bleeding is pretty easy if you have a pressure unit like the one Dave G descibes in the G Tech articles he wrote on the Clubgwagen site. They are available through Performance and many other places. I have an old metal pressure bleader that works well but I can't see the brake fluid level like the plastic ones with the built in pump. Very trick. I buy Castrol LMA brake fluid by the quart to fill it. I flush until I'm confident I have no air and only fresh fluid coming out the bleeder. Use a clear plastic tube to connect to the bleeder fitting and go into a clear water jug so you can monitor what's happening.
If you go through pads at 100,000 then changing them at 50 or 60,000 would be cheap preventative maintainence. The pistons compensate for the pad wear and move out of their bore following the pad. If you go to 15% remaining pad they will have moved out around a half an inch or more. If there is water in the brake fluid in the caliper it can set up corrosion in the bore leading to seizure when the pistons are pushed back in to accept new pads. Pads and fluid are very cheap compared to the other brake related parts. I use a little locktite on the brake caliper bolt threads before they go in. Blue seems to work fine.

-Dai
 
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