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1999 SLK 230
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937 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is not the most elegant solution, but it is one that can be done inexpensively with readily-available parts.

The alarm started sounding on my car when locked. PSE being the most likely culprit, I dissembled it for inspection. The circuit board did not appear corroded, but the A37 connector did. This connector contains contacts to the door switches, and if faulty can indicate that door has been opened when it is closed. I had trouble with this connector before, and fixed it then my cleaning the pins on the board and actually replacing one pin. This time I went for a hopefully more permanent fix.

Although there are 18 pins on the connector, only 5 are used. I decided to remove the header from the circuit board and wire directly to the board. Grabbing each pin in turn with a needle-nose pliers, I held a soldering iron to the back of the board and pulled each pin out one by one. The plastic header came out with the last pin. Examining the removed pins and circuit board the corrosion was evident.

I cleaned the surface of the circuit board and cleared the 5 holes of interest of solder. Next, I clipped the connector off from the car, leaving a short pigtail. With the connector still attached for reference, I stripped and soldered each of the 5 wires into their corresponding location on the board. I then clipped off the connector. I crimped bullet connectors, available at auto or hardware stores, onto the pigtail and at the wire loom in the car. The PSE was re installed matching color codes of the wires.

Like I said, not the most elegant, but inexpensive and effective.
 

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2004 230SLK
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222 Posts
Always look forward to your postings Dick. How are things in arid Minnesota? Has your lake dried up? My son tells me the crops around Elko are not looking good.
This is the first useful post I've seen on the PSE unit.
 

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Registered
1999 SLK 230
Joined
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937 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Always look forward to your postings Dick. How are things in arid Minnesota? Has your lake dried up? My son tells me the crops around Elko are not looking good.
This is the first useful post I've seen on the PSE unit.
We are in a part of the state that is not under drought conditions. We actually had an excess of rain earlier and the lake was up about a foot. One section of our dock started floating. There is actually a dam on the lake and it doesn't vary as much as other lakes can and have. We are near normal again.

My car developed some surface rust on the front fenders. I got some touch-up spray paint for it, but have been waiting for the humidity to drop a bit before tackling that project.
 

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2007 E550 (96K)
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53 Posts
Sorry to bring up an old thread but I just took my PSE pump apart and found the same issue. Looks like a brown liquid was spilled on the connectors and the electrolysis ate through the pins. Almost fell off my chair when I went to check the pins for continuity at the board and found them wobbly! The large wide connector with the four spades was very corroded as well. I cleaned up the joints and reflowed them.

Someone on another forum found the AMP part numbers for the wire end of the connectors but the board mount style can't be found. Not even a datasheet or part number mention.

Thanks for the write up, I plan on doing this to my car soon but using some removable connectors instead. My job has all the crimpers and tooling.
 

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Registered
2001 SLK320
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7 Posts
This is not the most elegant solution, but it is one that can be done inexpensively with readily-available parts.

The alarm started sounding on my car when locked. PSE being the most likely culprit, I dissembled it for inspection. The circuit board did not appear corroded, but the A37 connector did. This connector contains contacts to the door switches, and if faulty can indicate that door has been opened when it is closed. I had trouble with this connector before, and fixed it then my cleaning the pins on the board and actually replacing one pin. This time I went for a hopefully more permanent fix.

Although there are 18 pins on the connector, only 5 are used. I decided to remove the header from the circuit board and wire directly to the board. Grabbing each pin in turn with a needle-nose pliers, I held a soldering iron to the back of the board and pulled each pin out one by one. The plastic header came out with the last pin. Examining the removed pins and circuit board the corrosion was evident.

I cleaned the surface of the circuit board and cleared the 5 holes of interest of solder. Next, I clipped the connector off from the car, leaving a short pigtail. With the connector still attached for reference, I stripped and soldered each of the 5 wires into their corresponding location on the board. I then clipped off the connector. I crimped bullet connectors, available at auto or hardware stores, onto the pigtail and at the wire loom in the car. The PSE was re installed matching color codes of the wires.

Like I said, not the most elegant, but inexpensive and effective.
Thx for this. I also had the white connector corrosion problem with one pin completely gone. Your post inspired me to dust off my soldering skills and I canabilized an IDE connector from an old computer part to replace the white connector on the board. Desoldered the old and resoldered the new. Thing works fine now. Seems wrong to wrap an electronic part in plastic, as recommended in other guides. Maybe I'll build the vacuum pipe extenders and flip it over...
 
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