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2000 Mercedes-Benz E320 4matic
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, so I've been reading up a lot and doing some maintenance on my used E320. One of the items I did was to inspect the pilot bushing and there was fluid in the lower plug, but it hadn't travelled all the way up into the TCM yet. It was bone dry.

I replaced the bushing, but had a little difficulty getting it to seat enough to get the 7mm bolt to engage. I lined it up and tried many times before realizing that I needed to push it in harder first. I used a straight 7mm driver and socket to get it started. It seemed like I had turned it too much so I stopped turning it even though it didn't stop (I didn't want to strip it).

I tried to dry all the trans fluid off the connector but I think there was still some in-between the plug in connector connections. I didn't lose much fluid but I put about the same amount back in. I don't have a Dipstick yet (ordered one).

So anyhow, I went for a test drive and now the car is stuck in limp mode.

Any ideas what happened? Do I need to clear the CEL? Do I need to reset the ECU to fix the trans shift points? ORRRR did I mess something up majorly here? Could one of the electrical pins gotten bent or something? I'm at a loss here.
 

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The spacer/adapter/pilot bushing is desinged so it really only goes in one way. That's not to say it can't be forced, and potentially the little bolt cross-threaded.

When properly aligned and seated, the little bolt spins in easily and gets tight. If it's not tight it will leak, too.

As Eric notes, you do need to get the codes cleared, but of course find out what they are. You'll have to get them cleared at a dealer or indy (or indy trans shop).

If you are 110% sure you put the part in correctly, then maybe you just erred and overfilled it. Cross your fingers.
Good luck.
 

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The transmission takes big computer to reset and in my area indy wants $120 just for codes reading. I would pull the plug and recheck it before reading at this price, but it is just me.
 

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2000 Mercedes-Benz E320 4matic
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok

Thanks for the replies. I'm pretty sure I got it lined up correctly. I just had some trouble getting it down enough at first and was spinning in air I think. After I pushed it in by hand farther the bolt engaged right away and it pulled it in more. During all this the fluid was sneaking out a bit and I'm thinking it was sitting inside the bushing when I plugged in the connector. It was like that and working fine when unplugged it so I didn't think anything of it.

Could that fluid get into the plugs and mess it up? Is it supposed to be dry?
Or maybe I did over fill or under fill it with fluid. I tried to guess how much I lost in the pan I had under there, but if I was off would that cause this too? It's in limp mode to protect it because the fluid level is off?

I'm wondering what I could've done for the transmission to go into limp mode? I don't want to pay to have it cleared and it just pops right back on again. What makes it come on... fluids levels? Electrical short?

So you can't just use a scan gauge type portable OBDII to clear the CEL code. I don't even know if it's throwing a trans code because the CEL light was still on from when before I replaced the EGR valve. I am waiting on a couple breather hoses to solve that problem hopefully. I need to see if it's throwing a trans code too. I have a scangauge code reader, but my wife lost the plug in for it. I'll have to go to Autozone I guess.

Should I try taking the plug back out and cleaning it with electronics cleaner (noticed someone mentions that in the DIY thread). Would fluid in the connection at the plug cause a problem?
 

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WOW------you are either in electrical or hydraulic transmission limp mode because there is a fault.

Now you can shouda couda wouda the situation, but it ain't going to go away by itself. Some how and issue has been created and the only way you will find out the CORRECT answer, not speculation, because there are about 68 different transmission codes, is to have the transmission faults read----you may want to believe that you can read the transmission codes with your OBDII scanner, but you can't, you can only read emission related faults!!! You can continue to believe that and you will be in limp mode till you sell the car.

You need good transmission diagnostic help. That is available at the dealer or someone you may know who can access the transmission module via the 38 pin connector------otherwise you will never find out!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
codes

So I went and bought a cheap reader and it is showing the old PO400 egr emission code, but now also shows the PO758 limp code. I think it's in electrical limp mode because it does do the big drop into R or D. In my quest to prevent a future problem by changing out a $12 part (pilot bushing) I have now run into limp nightmare world. Of course now I'm wishing I would've just let it be as the leak was very minor... ugh.

So my question is can I just dry out the connector, and just disconnect the battery to clear the limp mode or is the only way to do it at a shop that can clear the Mercedes trans code?

If so, any suggestions where to go for that? Would a transmission shop be able to do it? The only Indy Mercedes or regular dealer is pretty far from me and I am stuck in limp mode and would have a tough time getting there.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
more

So my cheap $60 reader did clear both of the codes and the CEL light stayed off (for now). It seems to still be stuck in limp though because it went into gear hard when I went to put it up on the ramps. So, I also called a local transmission shop that is close to me and he say he is able to check and clear the transmission codes on a Mercedes. I made an appointment with him for 2 hours from now if my initial "Plan B" below doesn't work out.

PLAN B
So I just took out the plug/connector again and cleaned it out with electrical cleaner spray I then sprayed it with air in a can to clean and wiped it with a paper towel to clean it further. I also used the paper towel to clean out the inside of the bushing as best I could. There doesn't appear to be any leaks around it now so I think the 7mm bolt did engage ok.

I disconnected the battery just for kicks and will reconnect it in like 20 minutes to see if it clears the limp mode. I realize it probably won't, but I figure it wouldn't hurt to try and at worst I'll just have to reset my auto window feature and retrain the homelink, and radio presets.

I'll report back with how it turns out either way.

Thanks for the input so far......
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The saga continues

So I limped the car over to a Transmission place that told me they could clear trans codes on a Mercedes. All they had was a Snap On Solus Pro Scanner (granted a very expensive device once you add all the options to even be able to read our cars).... but it couldn't clear the codes that came up. A bunch of codes came up (like igntion codes) but he quickly tried to clear them so I didn't get those down. The two that it couldn't clear were:

003 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5
099 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5

SOOOO now I'm wondering if it's just their scanner that can't erase the codes since it's not a "Mercedes scanner" or if my changing a simple electrical connector/pilot bushing could really screw up 2 solenoids in my connector plate (aka valve body aka Mercedes electric kit) when they were fine before I started this DIY. Regardless, I don't feel like these guys understand Mercedes all that well and I decide to limp it a few more miles down the road to an Indy who specializes in Mercedes and get a second opinion (I'm out $49 so far for the first diagnostic).

The Indy Mercedes guys runs a full Star diagnostic and it comes up with those same two codes above on it being the bad Solenoids. He also showed that the TCM was bad and needed replaced too. He also could not permanently clear the above codes. NOW I am more upset because of course that was the part I was trying to avoid future damage to because of the leaching at the trans electrical connector. I was also about 3/4 bottle low of trans fluid, which I couldn't check because I haven't gotten my dipstick tool yet.... doh! I did put back the amount that it had lost though, but more must have leaked out of that connector obviously.

So far, my $12 preventative maintenance part has me starring at at least a $600 repair bill to put a new connector plate on. If the TCM needs replaced that's another $1,000 from the dealer. Ugh. They are telling me at this shop that you can't use one that doesn't match up with the VIN on this car, but I thought I read on here that others have bought them for like $150 used on eBay. Can I buy a used one and use it with this trans or are they correct?

I still can't think what happended that cause this. Could a little fluid in the connector have fried the TCM and cause the Solenoid's to seize? I've called 5 different places for opinions and they said they've never had this happen when changing that pilot bushing. Was it just incredible odds that the other things went immediately after I changed it? Doubtful I think. The only thing I can think is I didn't clean the fluid out well enough and that caused the problem... or that it running just 3/4 low on the trans fluid did all this.

At this point I am perplexed... and now the wallet is fully open. Sigh.
 

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I would unplug the connector and check all the connection pins inside the transmission as you may of bent one when fitting the electrical sleeve.
 

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I would unplug the connector and check all the connection pins inside the transmission as you may of bent one when fitting the electrical sleeve.
Plus one.

This time raise the front of the car about a 8-12" (tires hanging that far above the ground) which will flow the oil towards the back of the transmission and you will have very little leakage, if any. Pull the thing again and inspect all of it very carefully. If you were jockeying it around you may have had it misaligned or as Eric notes, damaged a pin or two.

Assuming it has the proper interface (38-pin under the hood) the snap on diagnostic system will clear codes.

Those solenoids are on the conductor plate, so it's possible you may have caused some other collateral damage by the initial run with it not working properly. Hopefully not, because that's going to require dropping the pan and valve body to get to the conductor plate.

Read through the 722.6xx FAQ in the sticky before you do much else. That will give you a bit more grounding.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hmm

I would unplug the connector and check all the connection pins inside the transmission as you may of bent one when fitting the electrical sleeve.
I was wondering about that before. Did I mess up the connector and that's why it's throwing that code.... because it can't see the solenoid or something? I couldn't figure out how to look into the connector plate to see those pins witout pulling the pan and the plate off though.
 

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003 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5

and

099 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5

are really the same codes. 003 + 96 = 099.

All it means is that there were two instances the code was set. One was intermittent (099) and another was active (003).

The chance of damaged contacts for this solenoid is very high when you replaced the connector.

The solenoid is on the conductor plate but is a separate part.
 

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So I limped the car over to a Transmission place that told me they could clear trans codes on a Mercedes. All they had was a Snap On Solus Pro Scanner (granted a very expensive device once you add all the options to even be able to read our cars).... but it couldn't clear the codes that came up. A bunch of codes came up (like igntion codes) but he quickly tried to clear them so I didn't get those down. The two that it couldn't clear were:

003 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5
099 2-3 Shift Solenoid Valve Y3/6Y5

SOOOO now I'm wondering if it's just their scanner that can't erase the codes since it's not a "Mercedes scanner" or if my changing a simple electrical connector/pilot bushing could really screw up 2 solenoids in my connector plate (aka valve body aka Mercedes electric kit) when they were fine before I started this DIY. Regardless, I don't feel like these guys understand Mercedes all that well and I decide to limp it a few more miles down the road to an Indy who specializes in Mercedes and get a second opinion (I'm out $49 so far for the first diagnostic).

The Indy Mercedes guys runs a full Star diagnostic and it comes up with those same two codes above on it being the bad Solenoids. He also showed that the TCM was bad and needed replaced too. He also could not permanently clear the above codes. NOW I am more upset because of course that was the part I was trying to avoid future damage to because of the leaching at the trans electrical connector. I was also about 3/4 bottle low of trans fluid, which I couldn't check because I haven't gotten my dipstick tool yet.... doh! I did put back the amount that it had lost though, but more must have leaked out of that connector obviously.

So far, my $12 preventative maintenance part has me starring at at least a $600 repair bill to put a new connector plate on. If the TCM needs replaced that's another $1,000 from the dealer. Ugh. They are telling me at this shop that you can't use one that doesn't match up with the VIN on this car, but I thought I read on here that others have bought them for like $150 used on eBay. Can I buy a used one and use it with this trans or are they correct?

I still can't think what happended that cause this. Could a little fluid in the connector have fried the TCM and cause the Solenoid's to seize? I've called 5 different places for opinions and they said they've never had this happen when changing that pilot bushing. Was it just incredible odds that the other things went immediately after I changed it? Doubtful I think. The only thing I can think is I didn't clean the fluid out well enough and that caused the problem... or that it running just 3/4 low on the trans fluid did all this.

At this point I am perplexed... and now the wallet is fully open. Sigh.
In process of mucking with 13 pin connector you either broke/bent one of the pins or broke track on conductor plate. During key on phase ETC sends voltage from pin 38 and looks for return on pin 16. If there is no return code 003/099 is set. Whole process takes milliseconds. Until condition that caused fault is remedied there is no scanner that will clear it.

Remove transmission control module connectors and check resistance between pins 38 and 16. Until you get specified value (2.5-6.5 ohms) keep looking.

.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I think you guys are on to something. I guess it's very possible that I damaged one of the pins getting the bushing in. I was having some trouble getting the 7mm to start as I didn't realize how much force you had to push it in with to get the new o-rings to go in. I know it was lined up, but maybe in my pushing it in by hand I put too much pressure on one side (I have a bad shoulder and it was difficult for me working under there). I have since read someone using a board and mallet to push it in. I wish that would have been in the original DIY thread heh.

I left the car at the Indy Mercedes mechanic yesterday where I tried to get them to clear the codes. I didn't want to drive it in 2nd gear all the way home 15 miles again. If I messed up that connection on the plate it'll obviously have to be replaced. They quoted me "around $500". I figure it's due for a trans service anyhow (was planning on doing it myself, but I might as well just have him replace the plate and he can do that too). I'm out $300 more I suppose, but at least I'll know the weak part in the trans is new now. :)

My lesson learned: read every thread and cross thread possible on a DIY project to learn the tips and not just the initial DIY thread! If I had read the more thorough ones by lou and G-AMG on changing the conn plate I would've have seen their tips too... doh!

Not trying to deflect my stupidity on this one as I take full responsibility for not reseaching it enough... but it might be helpful for other members if someone took Franasia's good pictures and turned it into a DIY guide like the ones lou or G-AMG did... noting the importance on lining up the bushing and connector, that you must push fairly hard to insert it fully and engage the bolt, that it is indeed a 7mm bolt (many people commented on it being a 6mm perhaps), that using a straight 7mm on a handle is best to get the bolt started, that it is important to only put 2.5 torque on it, etc.

I wish I would've read G-AMG's post and looked at his pretty pictures... lol


I feel I could do it all over again now very easily if I had researched it just a little bit further, or if that DIY link/thread had it spelled out like some of the other ones. I've been a weekend garage wanna be mechanic for over 20 years (although never Mercedes until last week). I've done all the basic maintenance stuff on many vehicles, throttle bodies, egr valves, radiator exchanges, steering column replacement, body work, and when younger I changed rear ends, built a couple engines, and even a transmission once many years ago. I feel quite stupid for messing up the pins on a simple trans electrical connector. :(

That said, I have been very impressed with this forum so far and I will continue to do many of my own repairs (after this one is done in the shop ... haha).
 

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Discussion Starter #17
One last question on this:

The Indy said that you have to get the TCM from the dealer and it matches up to the VIN on the car (he's charging me dealer cost on the part $204, so assuming he's getting a 20% mark up or something). He's saying he doesn't think you can put a used TCM in. Went on to say that when he's put a used trans in a car from a wreck he puts in the TCM as well.

Does this make any sense or is it ok to put a used TCM in if it's still showing a code after doing the new plate?
 

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There is a very small chance you need a new "TCM".

You may be able to repair the contacts. The worst case is a new conductor plate, which would be around $204 as charged by repair facilities.
 

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One last question on this:

The Indy said that you have to get the TCM from the dealer and it matches up to the VIN on the car (he's charging me dealer cost on the part $204, so assuming he's getting a 20% mark up or something). He's saying he doesn't think you can put a used TCM in. Went on to say that when he's put a used trans in a car from a wreck he puts in the TCM as well.

Does this make any sense or is it ok to put a used TCM in if it's still showing a code after doing the new plate?
That was the case in early life of 722.6 transmission. When you ordered ETC module in came in nice box with complete valve body.

Chances that your car needs ETC are slim and only if other faults are remedied first.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
There is a very small chance you need a new "TCM".

You may be able to repair the contacts. The worst case is a new conductor plate, which would be around $204 as charged by repair facilities.
Ok thanks. Yep, they are charging me $204 for the new conductor plate and I just talked to the mechanic as he was signing for the part delivery from the dealer. I'm hoping that once it is put in and the codes are cleared that the TCM issue is resolved. It seems that if I broke a pin off that it would think the TCM is also bad because it can't communicate through it.

That was the case in early life of 722.6 transmission. When you ordered ETC module in came in nice box with complete valve body.

Chances that your car needs ETC are slim and only if other faults are remedied first.
That makes me feel better thanks. So it was something they did in the late 90's ones, but not as common 2000+. Wheeew. I can't put another $1,000 into this car.
 
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