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Good point. The LCA bushings were rotten as they were original with 200k. I'll check these. Thanks.
If your Sway-Bar system has 200k miles... I wouldn't even check them... I'd just REPLACE, especially given your Symptoms.

At least on the W210, "Checking" was not always accurate. I had symptoms classic for sway bar Bushing/Link problem, but they "Looked" OK. Upon Changing? Symptoms Resolved.
 

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Hi G-AMG,

I have just replaced the hydraulic bushing on the lower control arm but I am concerned about a couple things.

When I first installed the bushing, with the tool settings and instructions following yours, the brand new MB bushing cracked like a cracker. Oil leaking out (hence "hydraulic bushing"). The hydraulic bushing is composed of an "inner piece" and and an "outer piece". If you install as it is recommended by WIS (identical to yours), you will stress the inner piece relative to the outer piece. This stress cracked mine. Luckily I had another new one. I modified the setup a bit and tried to hold onto the outer piece's metal ring as opposed to the inner piece. This got he job done without cracking.

But...

In the last 5 mm or so I hear a cracking sound and saw little wetness around the already tightened busing and the eye. It is not leaking, but I am afraid it cracked again inside.

Do you have any recommendations to avoid this?

I am using the same lubricant as you did.

Thank you
 

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i used the instructions for the w129 chassis at peach parts forum. At pelican parts.You don't need a spring compressor.you jack up the body,then place jack under spring,and lower it slowly.
i did mine replaced everything.
 

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Do you have any recommendations to avoid this?
Taking the liberty to give an suggestion (though I'm not G-AMG);

Do you mean that this gap compressed will risk the bush of cracking?



I do not know what tool tweaks you did, but perhaps putting part 012k (in G-AMGs pictures)
in that gap when pushing it in, could be better?



br,
syljua
 

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Taking the liberty to give an suggestion (though I'm not G-AMG);

Do you mean that this gap compressed will risk the bush of cracking?



I do not know what tool tweaks you did, but perhaps putting part 012k (in G-AMGs pictures)
in that gap when pushing it in, could be better?



br,
syljua

Right, I did this but it burst the hydraulic fluid out of the rear LCA bush, fluid dripped out, that bush is now softer than the other non-molested bush. How on earth did G-AMG did it without bursting anything?

I think I'll be making up a custom plate to go with part "12k" for the job.

Edit: plate made no difference. Although it was more gentler on install I popped the 2nd bush as well. I'll see how it goes anyway, order of magnitude better the the bushes that I removed.
 

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My comments would be as follows:

If you are using the "proper tool" specifically designed for the W140 lower control arm bushing remove and replace you should not be having this problem or any problem for that matter. Since the tool will apply the load to the external shoulder of the bushing and not apply any force on the hydraulic system of the bushing. Also, the tool will set the bushing perfectly into the LCA.

If you are having a problem all I could think of is:
- tool using is not correct e.g. could be a counterfeit with improper dimensions which loads the hydraulic mechanism, which it should not do
- you are not using the tool correctly
- the bushings are not OEM and may be counterfeit or subpar e.g. uro, myele or other garbage.

I have done this many times so I am speaking from repeated experience.

Best of luck hope all goes well. I do agree that you are doing the right thing and attempting to resolve the "issue" before you install them in the vehicle.

Seth
 

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I just did this job on my '99 S500. I used a knockoff tool sold by Zdmak. I worked quite well. I used the Lemforder kit so rear bushing is oil-filled.

It is not specifically true that no force is applied to the oil filled middle section when using the MB style tool. The cup used to apply force to the bushing seats on the metal end that is in turn attached to the oil-filled middle. The tool does not press on the annular hard shell around the oil-filled middle.

What is interesting about the matter of leakage is that even if you do not see leakage during install, you may see some later after install.

Front bushings are most easily removed with an air hammer & chisel tip. Same as for F&R R129 LCA bushings.

The note cited by G-AMG of doing a 'dry-run' pressing the new front bushings outside of the control arm is 'golden'. The metal spacer has to be really pressed with a lot of force to engage on the OD of the center metal tube of the bushings. It must go over these or the length between the flanges will be too long for the LCA eyelet. It helps to have come dial calipers handy, then you can measure the length of the LCA eyelet and keep pressing the bushings together on the 'dry-run' until you get the distance between the outer metal flanges equal to the LCA eyelet length. It is surprising how much force is needed for this and I even put a little anti-sieze in that little c-bores in the metal spacer for lubricity in the fitting.

By doing the dry-run, you can ensure that the spacer is square (not cock-eyed). You may need the air hammer again to knock one of the bushings off the middle spacer for the 'real' fitting into the LCA.

After doing the LCA bushings today, I had to take a break for Thanksgiving dinner, then I went back out and replaced both tie rod assys with new Lemforders. When I went to clamp the eccentrics in the laden position with Race Ramps, I noticed a small wetness art the interface of the rubber & the hard shell on the rearward end of the bushing. No drips, but just a little bit of wetness at the interface.

I had been warned by my MB mechanic friend that this pretty common and not to worry; the bushings still are good for 100k miles.

The replacement of the LCA bushings did remove the last vestige of any steering wheel vibrations as cited by G-AMG. It also has a notable effect on the damping of the edges of the bumps.

I've been on a tough push this past week to get rid of all steering vibrations & front end noises this past week or two with drive line flex discs; center bearing & mount; re-build/replace front wheel bearings; new sway bar links.

Finally, this car rides like a dream.
 

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Glad to hear this

I just did this job on my '99 S500. I used a knockoff tool sold by Zdmak. I worked quite well. I used the Lemforder kit so rear bushing is oil-filled.

It is not specifically true that no force is applied to the oil filled middle section when using the MB style tool. The cup used to apply force to the bushing seats on the metal end that is in turn attached to the oil-filled middle. The tool does not press on the annular hard shell around the oil-filled middle.

What is interesting about the matter of leakage is that even if you do not see leakage during install, you may see some later after install.

Front bushings are most easily removed with an air hammer & chisel tip. Same as for F&R R129 LCA bushings.

The note cited by G-AMG of doing a 'dry-run' pressing the new front bushings outside of the control arm is 'golden'. The metal spacer has to be really pressed with a lot of force to engage on the OD of the center metal tube of the bushings. It must go over these or the length between the flanges will be too long for the LCA eyelet. It helps to have come dial calipers handy, then you can measure the length of the LCA eyelet and keep pressing the bushings together on the 'dry-run' until you get the distance between the outer metal flanges equal to the LCA eyelet length. It is surprising how much force is needed for this and I even put a little anti-sieze in that little c-bores in the metal spacer for lubricity in the fitting.

By doing the dry-run, you can ensure that the spacer is square (not cock-eyed). You may need the air hammer again to knock one of the bushings off the middle spacer for the 'real' fitting into the LCA.

After doing the LCA bushings today, I had to take a break for Thanksgiving dinner, then I went back out and replaced both tie rod assys with new Lemforders. When I went to clamp the eccentrics in the laden position with Race Ramps, I noticed a small wetness art the interface of the rubber & the hard shell on the rearward end of the bushing. No drips, but just a little bit of wetness at the interface.

I had been warned by my MB mechanic friend that this pretty common and not to worry; the bushings still are good for 100k miles.

The replacement of the LCA bushings did remove the last vestige of any steering wheel vibrations as cited by G-AMG. It also has a notable effect on the damping of the edges of the bumps.

I've been on a tough push this past week to get rid of all steering vibrations & front end noises this past week or two with drive line flex discs; center bearing & mount; re-build/replace front wheel bearings; new sway bar links.

Finally, this car rides like a dream.
Glad to hear that you changed the driveshaft center support mount and center support bearing as I suspect most do not do this (they simply go for the flex disc replacements) which would neglect a much need replacement for these wear item parts. does anyone really thing that the rubber mount is not collapsed and the bearing is not shot after 180K miles. Of course the added step of completly removing the driveshaft is required but that is part of the job.

Then one can sit back in the driver seat and notice how much quieter the ride is e.g. the center support bearing was completly dried out.

BTW similar experience and results with the front wheel bearing, fan clutch bearing bracket, water pump bearing etc....back to that new car quiet ride.

Seth
 

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Syljua,

I stand corrected. Please accept my apologies. The credit is rightly yours about doing the 'dry-run'.

As you can see, I studied this thread from beginning to end on this, but I did get my bibliography a bit jumbled up.

This is a great thread on this subject.

I just got the car aligned this morning and the car really feels right now, at least for a while.

Now I can stop taking this car apart for at least some number of months. There are always other projects to work on.
 
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