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diesel drain plug location 1997 E300D

On my 1997 E300 D non turbo, my block drain plug is on the passenger side of the engine. ( a couple inches just below the exhaust Manifold...) look for a silver coated plug that has a nipple on it to attach a drain hose. If my memory serves me it is 19 MM socket. A bright flashlight should help in finding the plug.

thanks for the DIY very helpful
 

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1999 E-320
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I have a question on using the vacuum refill method. If you drain the coolant from the engine block and radiator, how does the vacuum refill get the coolant to the engine block? Doesn't the thermostat have to be opened, in order to for the new coolant to get into the engine block? G-AMG's comments make it seem like you will fill radiator and engine block in one fell swoop, but how can do you do this if the thermostat is closed? Also, do the comments about the vacuum method leaving no air pockets assume that there isn't any air pockets in the heater core? Thanks to anyone who can respond.
 

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'98 W210 E320, '99 E300TD, '03 W220 S500
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I have a question on using the vacuum refill method. If you drain the coolant from the engine block and radiator, how does the vacuum refill get the coolant to the engine block? Doesn't the thermostat have to be opened, in order to for the new coolant to get into the engine block? G-AMG's comments make it seem like you will fill radiator and engine block in one fell swoop, but how can do you do this if the thermostat is closed? Also, do the comments about the vacuum method leaving no air pockets assume that there isn't any air pockets in the heater core? Thanks to anyone who can respond.
Did you ever find an answer to this? I assume that there will not be air gaps in the heater cores so longs as you turn the heater on before doing this, thus opening the duo valves. But I sill don't know how air will get through that thermostat, especially since it doesn't have a bleeder for some odd reason. My only guess is that the vacuum creates enough pressure to open it.
 

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Did you ever find an answer to this? I assume that there will not be air gaps in the heater cores so longs as you turn the heater on before doing this, thus opening the duo valves. But I sill don't know how air will get through that thermostat, especially since it doesn't have a bleeder for some odd reason. My only guess is that the vacuum creates enough pressure to open it.
Actually, I was just wondering about how coolant got into the engine block via the vacuum fill method. I don't think I ever got a direct reply from anyone but I figured that the coolant goes through the water pump--the water pump doesn't have to be running for coolant to get through via the vacuum fill; there are air gaps and the vacuum in the system will suck the coolant in.

As far as the heater cores are concerned, I am not sure if there is any air gaps with system off. If G-AMG sees this, he will probably be able to respond. Haven't looked at this thread for a while, so don't know if he mentioned this elsewhere in the thread.
 

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I wanted to share my experience with burping the air out of my cooling system.

Just replaced the thermostat on my 2001 E320 4matic Wagon. I didn't do anything special, just watched a few YouTube videos first, then did the job. Not my first rodeo, but my first in a Benz, so I was looking for any weirdness. Anyway, at reassembly, I filtered my used coolant through a nylon and put it back in, but it wouldn't all fit, and I ended up with no heat. No, I didn't use the vacuum fill method, just gravity.

Idling the car didn't clear the air pocket from the block and heater core.

What finally worked for me was to downshift the car to 3rd and accelerate hard up a hill on a 55 mph road, keeping the RPMs above 3,000 after it had warmed up(at/above 80C). This forced the coolant to flow faster with gravity and inertia pulling it toward the back of the car, into the block and heater core. After doing this, I had heat and the "check coolant level" message came on, so I knew that the air blockage had been purged out if the block and heater core into the reservoir bottle.

Next time I plan to do the vacuum method. I already have a Harbor Freight one-man brake bleeder that connects to my shop air compressor (no pumping), so I just need the radiator cap adaptors.

On a side note, the car came with yellow coolant in it (I'm now assuming it was Zerez Z-05) and I topped it off with Pentofrost NF, which is a light blue Euro spec coolant...so now I have green coolant. I'm glad color doesn't matter, since they both are listed to meet the proper specifications by their manufacturers, but at my next change, I'm going to the Zerex Z-05, mainly due to price. It's at least 3x cheaper then Pentafrost.
 

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Started with a 97 E420. Got hooked. 98 S420 then 06 S500, now 11 S550. Best car I ever owned.
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This pictorial DIY procedure for purge and vacuum fill is inspiring. Every time I have changed the radiator fluid manually it is a mess, I spill some, which is dangerous in a household with pets. I am puzzled by one aspect of the process though. How do you create the vacuum for the refill? When I look at these tool kits on eBay and Amazon, I see where they say purge and refill and picture a hand pump. If I read the procedure shown here correctly, I see shop air, from a compressor?, being used. Maybe I am very dumb, but I thought a compressor just produces pressured air, which would work to pressure test the radiator, but not remove the air?

Stated another way, do these kits for purge and vacuum refill allow you to use a compressor to generate the vacuum needed for the refill? If so, how does that work?
 

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'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
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Discussion Starter #48
Stated another way, do these kits for purge and vacuum refill allow you to use a compressor to generate the vacuum needed for the refill? If so, how does that work?
"YES". Shop air is used to drive a "Vacuum Mechanism" in the tool, turning 'pressure' into 'vacuum'.
 

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Started with a 97 E420. Got hooked. 98 S420 then 06 S500, now 11 S550. Best car I ever owned.
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Thank you for the reply. I am going to buy one of these kits now and try your procedure. :grin

"YES". Shop air is used to drive a "Vacuum Mechanism" in the tool, turning 'pressure' into 'vacuum'.
 

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2010 E350 P1/P2, 2008 S550 Designo, 2002 ML320
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G-AMG said:
"YES". Shop air is used to drive a "Vacuum Mechanism" in the tool, turning 'pressure' into 'vacuum'.
I did this over the weekend on my S550. It's the same procedure, same tools as for the W210, literally just used the same vacuum filling tool I've used on my E430 and ML320, just a different color coolant now.

It's amazing and a testament to your work G, 9 years later and this is still giving back to folks who like to get dirty with their Benz!:beerchugr:
 

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To reply to where to hook up the vacuum pump: it doesn't suck the coolant into the system from the other end, you simply apply vacuum to the entire system at the bottle, which removed all the air, leaving empty space in the system. You can connect the vacuum source anywhere it can suck air but not liquid.

(Mr. Wizard moment below)

When you apply vacuum to a filled system with air pockets in it, the air will expand, making it easier to get out. The larger bubbles partially button themselves out. Any small pockets will be carried out naturally by the coolant, once the system is mostly burped.

The best tools will have a T-fitting connected to the coolant bottle cap. You connect the bottle of coolant and the vacuum source to the fitting. Once all the air is evacuated, you shut off the valve to the vacuum and open the valve to the coolant. With no air in the system, the coolant is pushed into the system by atmospheric pressure, almost 15 psi.

Fancy tools and adaptors aren't really required, but do make the job faster, easier, and cleaner.
 

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2000 SL320, 2001 CLK320
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Another thing not mentioned here - when purging the old coolant out switch on the ignition and put the heater on highest heat setting, this switches on the electric coolant pump which will pump a fair amount of coolant out of the heater matrix.

Not necessary to vacuum pump, fill to normal level with ignition and heater on. Take it for a drive and the next day when cool fill up to correct level again.
 

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2010 ML350-4matic | 2012 BMW x3 x28i | 1997 E320 (junked @ 118K) | 1998 E320 (retired @ 233K)
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ILJ, it's due to the design of the block/water jackets. They act as separate reservoirs, if you will. So as G points out if you want to get all the residual out, you have to go this route.

Take care and enjoy the ride,
Greg
Hey if we go this route and drain also from the block, is the refill capacity still the same 10.6 qt?

Pin2
 

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'04 G55 '80 280GE '99 S420 '98 E320 2011 E350 2016 GLA250
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Discussion Starter #54
It's amazing and a testament to your work G, 9 years later and this is still giving back to folks who like to get dirty with their Benz!:beerchugr:

Bite your tongue, Man!!!

I *NEVER* touch my Benz's with 'Dirty' Hands!! haaa haa
 
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