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some have left, some have center , but many are on the right as the rules are reversed for water navigation, and you pass on the left, able to talk to the other driver. Many drag boats are left drive, many fishing boats are center console
 

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some have left, some have center , but many are on the right as the rules are reversed for water navigation, and you pass on the left, able to talk to the other driver. Many drag boats are left drive, many fishing boats are center console
Boats do not pass on the left. Navigation rules require altering course to starboard to pass unless unsafe. Power boats usually have the controls on the left side of the boat because it's easier to run the control cables directly into the side on which they are located. The throttle/shift is usually on the right.
 

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Boats do not pass on the left. Navigation rules require altering course to starboard to pass unless unsafe. Power boats usually have the controls on the left side of the boat because it's easier to run the control cables directly into the side on which they are located. The throttle/shift is usually on the right.
I meant the controls are usually on the right, as in your pic.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
some have left, some have center , but many are on the right as the rules are reversed for water navigation, and you pass on the left, able to talk to the other driver. Many drag boats are left drive, many fishing boats are center console




Pass on left? I think you can pass on either side when overtaking. When two vessels are heading toward each other, each must reroute and pass to the right of the other. With steering on starboard (right) side, drivers are well away from each other. So that doesn't seem to explain it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Boats do not pass on the left. Navigation rules require altering course to starboard to pass unless unsafe. Power boats usually have the controls on the left side of the boat because it's easier to run the control cables directly into the side on which they are located. The throttle/shift is usually on the right.
Could just be a practical reason like that. But why would they choose to put the engine controls on the right (assuming an outboard here, but same applies to inboards)
 

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Could just be a practical reason like that. But why would they choose to put the engine controls on the right (assuming an outboard here, but same applies to inboards)
Most people are right handed, so shift and throttle with right hand. I've had bigger boats with split controls and shift was on the right and throttles on the left. I think Reggie Fountain (Fountain Powerboats) was left handed and the Fountains in th e1990s-2000s had the controls on the left side of the wheel. But the wheel was still on the right side of the boat. Weird...
 

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https://azureblob.faecdn.com/cdn/d/bex/i/nav_3.gif


Pass on left? I think you can pass on either side when overtaking. When two vessels are heading toward each other, each must reroute and pass to the right of the other. With steering on starboard (right) side, drivers are well away from each other. So that doesn't seem to explain it.
This forum is full of bullshitters

The boat on the left GIVES WAY, by going even more left
 

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Been here just 4 months eh? And you are insulting us? hmm.

Sorry I asked guys and even more sorry Steve Wyatt answered ;)
This forum is full of bullshitters

The boat on the left GIVES WAY, by going even more left
Where's our resident sailor @SteveGuilford at when you need him?

If i recall correctly Steve told me passing rules are similar to north American street rules. Two power boats coming head on should turn starboard (right) and pass each other port side (left).

The national maritime college seems to agree with me.
Rules to remember when two vessels meet
  • When two power vessels are approaching head on,both vessels should alter course to starboard to pass port-side to port-side.
  • When two power-driven vessels are in crossing situation on a collision course, give way to the vessel to starboard (right).The give way vessel must take early and obvious action to avoid a collision by either stopping or altering course to starboard.
  • If the give way vessel has another power-driven vessel from the Port (left) which does not take obvious action to give way, or alter course to starboard, then the Skipper of give-way (stand on) vessel must take evasive action by either stopping, or again, altering course to starboard.
  • Every vessel (power or sail) that is overtaking must keep well clear of the over taking vessel. You are overtaking if you are approaching another vessel anywhere in a 135 degree sector at its stern.
Channels and harbours

  • All vessels must keep to the starboard (right) side of any channel.
  • Inside a harbour (normally shown on the pilotage limit on the chart) you must keep out of the way of any ship over 500 tons. (which is about 50 metres in length)
  • Do not create a wake which causes unnecessary danger to other vessels or people.
  • You must not anchor in a channel.
  • All small craft must keep out of the way of larger vessels which are restricted by their draft to maintain passage and steering within the channel.
When power meets power
  • You must give way to another vessel on your starboard. (right)
  • If you meet head on, both vessels must turn to starboard. (right)

This all gets thrown out when power meets sail and then the rules are, "just GTFO of the way of a sailboat at all costs".

Handy dandy graphic too


I hope you mean , "going more left" from your perspective and not the perspective of the other boater. Because if that's the case, then you and that other boater are in for a bad time :p
 

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Because most people are right handed and the beer holder is on the right? :eek::devilish:
That may be very important in Oklahoma (you have boats there?). But in our part of the world, we are not allowed to drink while boating. Only time is in a boat that has a cabin with sleeping and galley facilities. And then only while anchored. We, of course, stick strictly to these rules :)

OKyb said:
Where's our resident sailor @SteveGuilford at when you need him?
I could qualify for that too? Sailing since I was a kid, but not much motorboating! One rule you missed, was the gross tonnage rule. With that one, while sailing, if the ship under power is bigger than you, you give way!
 

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That may be very important in Oklahoma (you have boats there?). But in our part of the world, we are not allowed to drink while boating. Only time is in a boat that has a cabin with sleeping and galley facilities. And then only while anchored. We, of course, stick strictly to these rules :)

OKyb said:

I could qualify for that too? Sailing since I was a kid, but not much motorboating! One rule you missed, was the gross tonnage rule. With that one, while sailing, if the ship under power is bigger than you, you give way!
Comeon chaps, you need to get back to the Vikings and Lief Erikson. Viking longboats had the rudder on the RHS of the back of the boat, Which was an important piece of kit, so to preserve it from impact, they always docked to a jetty on the LHS of the boat. This gave us Steuerbord as a name for the steering-board side of the boat, which became Starboard in English, and the prosaic Port for the left side. Just a very old tradition. Abd of course, it correctlly mimics the position of steering wheels in cars in the UK. where we make Sunseeker yachts, do we not? Nuff sed.
 

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No definitive answer to this question, but several possibilities to consider:
1) Historical placement of steering oar on starboard side of vessel.
2) Better visibility in crossing situations where vessel approaching from starboard forward position has right of way.
3) Weight of helmsman on starboard side to help counterbalance torque of single clockwise rotating propeller which tends to lift port side of vessel while making way.
Interesting non-W 107 discussion. Picture shows center helm position.
 

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This forum is full of bullshitters

The boat on the left GIVES WAY, by going even more left
It's been awhile since we had some not nice comment here.
I actually miss some drama.
But still....not nice.
 

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I have been boating here over 30 years. If you think this is confusing get on the water and see what a few beers can do to the drivers. Owning many boats I can't remember one with the throttle on the left and would feel awkward to me. The big names in outboards had most control boxes from 25hp up were screwed into the wall on the right. On center consoles screwed in the right side edge of the console leaving the steering wheel in the middle. Now most have helm controls cut in but on the right side of the wheel. My guess is outboard mfg's used the same design for the controls to place the driver not navigation. The red and green markers just give direction. We should be on the right side of the ditch like a road.

btw I do have beer holders. You can't sip and drive. You can stop and drink but can get a DUI on the water. More and more common now. In the old days we went to fish and drink beer or vice versa.
 
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