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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The "Carolina Squat" ... dumb dumb dumb.
I guess its done for the "look" ... I think it looks silly.
I would think trucks with the front end raised would steer and handle badly.
The first time I had taken note of this was when we were vacationing at an RV campground
a few weeks ago. Some were even towing travel trailers with "squatted" trucks.


ZZZ_2021_06-09_001.jpg
 

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1986 560SL with M120 V12 Engine, 1988 560SL Stock
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12,071 Posts
I'm too old to comment. But I'm sure my son loves it.
 

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2005 SLK350, 91 300SL with Pano Top, 04 S500, 2015 Tesla Model S
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2,121 Posts
By the title I expected a picture of Roncallo squatting beside his man cave. :D
 

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1983 380SL, ivory/dk brown, 46k miles, dual roller timing chain. 1986 560SL, red/white, 190K mile.
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8,051 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would think to "squat" at truck like that is going to require enough money justify it that makes the truck look appealing. I'm a Baby Boomer, perhaps its a Millennial thing.
 

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1999 E320, 2000 E320, 2003 E320 Wagon, 2005 C230K SS, 2010 Accord LX w Eibach & Koni FSD's
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3,945 Posts
LOL...........I saw one the other day, but not to that extreme. I just thought it was a bad suspension lowering job.
 

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1973 450 sl
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149 Posts
Back in the early 1960"s in the midwest US, that was called a "rake", or the car was "raked". Don't know where the term came from. It was done by raising the front.
 

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Cypress Green 1997 Mercedes E420 Sport
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81 Posts
The "Carolina Squat" ... dumb dumb dumb.
I guess its done for the "look" ... I think it looks silly.
I would think trucks with the front end raised would steer and handle badly.
The first time I had taken note of this was when we were vacationing at an RV campground
a few weeks ago. Some were even towing travel trailers with "squatted" trucks.


View attachment 2696018
Why?! Shaking my head at my computer screen in disgust. What a waste of money.
 
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1988 560SL Currently, 1972 350SL (RIP)
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403 Posts
I used to live in San Diego about 10 years ago and it was huge there with trucks. Always thought it was the dumbest thing ever and sad to see it spreading instead of dying like it should have many years ago.
 

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1989 560SL; 2014 E350
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1,586 Posts
Back in the 70s and 80s, many of the kids, including my son, raised their pick-ups so high that it seemed almost impossible to get into them. I never really understood why they did that. A couple of decades later, I can remember seeing cars that were lowered so much that the entire frame sat right on the road service.I was puzzled by all that as well, and this new(?) phase seems equally ridiculous. I'm waiting for someone to flip cars & trucks upside down so that the wheels are on the roof!
 

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1988 560SL Currently, 1972 350SL (RIP)
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403 Posts
It reads "Carolina" on my computer.
“The Carolina Squat actually began from southern California. It is also referred to as the California (Cali) Lean or the Tennessee lean. The trend is inspired by Baja racing, which was popular in the desert terrains of California. In racing, it actually has a function. Since the Baja is raced on a hilly surface, that means there are lots of jumps. The idea is, when a Baja truck hits a jump at a higher speed, to land its rear first, thus avoiding nose-dive, which could potentially total the truck and would mean the end of the race for that competitor”
 

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1986 560SL
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176 Posts
The idea is, when a Baja truck hits a jump at a higher speed, to land its rear first, thus avoiding nose-dive, which could potentially total the truck and would mean the end of the race for that competitor”
From what I understand, a vehicle leaving the ground while jumping a hill does so because the road and truck are separating from each other faster than gravity can keep them in contact. The curving top of the hill causes a forward rotation of the truck that continues while flying through the air, making landing on the front wheels the likely outcome, if the road has flattened out. Those raised trucks have a lot of suspension travel to deal with that. Motocross jumpers, on the other hand, have air drag on their bodies to counteract that rotation, so they usually land on the back wheel.
 
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