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News Corp.’s Fox News Channel led the cable news networks in average viewership during 2008, according to Nielsen Media Research released Tuesday.

Fox News captured a daily average of 1.06 million viewers, compared to CNN, which averaged 695,000 viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by the network. MSNBC averaged 468,000 viewers.

Nielsen ended its year on Dec. 28, which is the last full week of 2008.

This is the seventh consecutive year Fox News has topped bitter rival CNN, owned by Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting System, the network said.

For the key prime-time slot — 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. — Fox News averaged 2.05 million viewers in 2008, compared to CNN, which averaged 1.29 million viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by CNN and Fox News.

Fox News also had a larger number of viewers in the 25-54 age group for prime time, averaging 494,000 viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by the networks. CNN averaged 455,000 viewers, and MSNBC averaged 364,000 viewers.

CNN topped Fox News in the prime-time category for viewers age 25-54 for the first quarter of 2008, briefly taking bragging rights in the category away from Fox News for the first time since 2001.

Fox News stays ahead of CNN in viewership | ajc.com
 

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Someone will come on here and tell you their overall viewer ship is dropping. :eek:
 

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Someone will come on here and tell you their overall viewer ship is dropping. :eek:
I don't know if that's true, but I wouldn't be surprised given the increase in cable outlets overall in the last seven years. Everyone who's been around that long will probably show a drop in total viewers, but the bottom line--in more ways than one--is, and always will be, who is winning the competition... Clearly, that is FOX--the fair and balanced network!
 

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CNN's getting desperate. I just channel surfed through Larry King interviewing some meathead from WWF.
 

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^^^ How did the New Years eve gig go for ya?
 

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CNN's getting desperate. I just channel surfed through Larry King interviewing some meathead from WWF.
You didn't like the UFO interviews?:confused:
I loved it when the guys ragged on the "Science Guy":D
what a douche:p
 

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Hey, thanks for asking. It went pretty well. They asked us to keep playing into the wee hours, so I guess we sound OK to drunks. Here's a few shots, the core band, the band with the drummer's kids adding horns, and assbabe with the band before we went on.
 

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Hey, thanks for asking. It went pretty well. They asked us to keep playing into the wee hours, so I guess we sound OK to drunks. Here's a few shots, the core band, the band with the drummer's kids adding horns, and assbabe with the band before we went on.
Sounds like a real crowd pleaser then!:thumbsup:
 

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I don't know if that's true, but I wouldn't be surprised given the increase in cable outlets overall in the last seven years. Everyone who's been around that long will probably show a drop in total viewers, but the bottom line--in more ways than one--is, and always will be, who is winning the competition... Clearly, that is FOX--the fair and balanced network!
You are correct that expanded cable options are drawing viewers to different outlets.

But the "Clearly, that is Fox...", not so true. NBC averages about 9.5 Million per newscast, ABC about 9 Million and CBS about 7 Million. At 1-2 Million viewers, Fox and CNN are still upstarts in the biz.

The survey you quoted also failed to count CNN's HLN in the mix as it is also a player in the field. When you add CNN and HLN together, they are about 85% of Fox's viewers, and they don't have what anyone would consider "obsessive" viewers that Fox has. BillO and Hannity, which make up much of the volume of Fox's Prime Time numbers have a "special" viewing audience that is very small, but very loyal.

Also, note that the new majority of folks are grabbing their news/views from right here on the net. It is that which has advertisers freaking as they can't control or meter results with any efficiency on net ads.



Where People Go Every Day for News

Dec 15, 2008

-By Mark Dolliver, Adweek

It has become an article of faith that 2008's presidential election aroused intense interest in the news. But you wouldn't guess it from a pair of Gallup surveys that tabulated the numbers of people who go to various media every day to get news. Comparing the current findings (gathered the first week of this month) to those of a December 2006 poll, Gallup found increases for news on the Internet and on cable news networks. The figure was up slightly for national newspapers as well, albeit from a very small base. But no other news media showed a significant gain since 2006, and several had significant declines.

In both polls, local TV news had the highest number of respondents saying they look to it every day. But the figure slid to 51 percent in the new poll from 55 percent in the earlier one. Local newspapers took a similar hit (44 percent then, 40 percent now). The numbers were nearly unchanged for the nightly network news shows (35 percent then, 34 percent now) and for the national morning news/interview shows (28 percent then, 29 percent now). Radio talk shows fell slightly (20 percent then, 18 percent now), as did National Public Radio (19 percent then, 18 percent now). The figure for national newspapers rose (from 7 percent), but remains in single digits (at 9 percent). The significant gains belonged to cable news networks (34 percent then, 40 percent now) and news on the Internet (22 percent then, 31 percent now).

A breakdown of the findings by age groups indicates that old folks are the most avid consumers of news, almost irrespective of media. Sixty-three percent of respondents age 65-plus said they look to local TV news every day, vs. 56 percent of the 50-64-year-olds, 48 percent of the 30-49s and 36 percent of the 18-29s. Fifty-six percent of the 65-plusers take a nightly look at the network nightly news, vs. 42 percent of 50-64s, 26 percent of 30-49s and 18 percent of 18-29s. The numbers aren't wildly different for cable network news, with 65-plusers the most likely to seek news there every day and the 18-29s least likely to do so (59 percent vs. 24 percent). Looking at the numbers for local newspapers, one is struck by how sharply the everyday-readership number falls from the 65-plus cohort (68 percent) to the 50-64 bracket (42 percent). Apparently 20somethings aren't the only ones shunning newsprint these days.

As you'd expect, young folks are more likely than old folks to go to Internet news sources every day. But the number of 18-29-year-olds doing so, 36 percent, isn't all that large. In fact, it lags behind the proportion of 30-49-year-olds who use the Internet for this purpose on a daily basis (42 percent).Twenty-seven percent of the 50-64s and 14 percent of the 65-plusers do so.

The survey also looked at a few once-a-week sources of news, and the trend here confirmed that weekly newsmagazines have big problems. The proportion of respondents saying they look to such magazines every week for news fell from an already lackluster 12 percent in 2006 to 8 percent this year. For that matter, the television newsmagazine shows suffered a dropoff in the number of people saying they watch every week, from 20 percent then to 17 percent now. TV's Sunday-morning news shows bucked the trend, with their every-week audience rising from 19 percent then to 21 percent now.

Where People Go Every Day for News
 

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Weren't we talking TV cable network news?
 

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Weren't we talking TV cable network news?
Cable News does not live in a vacuum. Since a very high majority of Americans subscribe to cable or sat [89%], and since broadcast news [ABC, NBC, CBS] are fed through the same settop box, there is no longer a discernible differential between services.

Unless a survey is looking at ALL news sources and the viewership of them, it completely misses the point of relevance. While FOX may be the number 1 cable news channel, that "number 1" status has no relevance when viewed from the perspective of the 40 million people who tune in for nightly news slices. And it pales when viewed with the total spectrum of Cable programming available.

To put Fox [or CNN for that matter] into perspective, here is a list of the top 100 shows for the week ending 12/21. Note that the ONLY news type show in the group belongs to 60 Minutes at #21.
Weekly Bdcst vs. Cable Primetime Ratings

So while the original article was about Cable News shows, its relevance is only important when looked at in relation with broadcast news, other news sources and the internet. It allows you to better understand that Fox is only number 1 in a subset, not in the superset.
 

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Somebody should let Nielsen Media Research know they got it wrong and don't know what they're doing when it comes to rating TV cable news.
 

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Somebody should let Nielsen Media Research know they got it wrong and don't know what they're doing when it comes to rating TV cable news.
Nielsen knows what they are doing. They are doing the survey they were PAID to do. But that has nothing to do with proper analysis of the raw data.

While Nielsen does their breakdown of the paid job correctly, they don't include ALL media because that was not in their contract and not in their trending. [It would be as if Nielsen was contracted to survey buying decisions for midsized American sedans [Chevy, Pontiac, Ford, Dodge]. A valid survey but not relevant to actual market decision making and strategic analysis]

If you want to understand what ALL media is doing you utilize aggregate surveys from neilsen, arbitron, adage and mediaweek. There is also a settop box stream that captures everything drawn from the top seven providers that gives 68% coverage and provides the most comprehensive analysis. It, however is not available to news media for publication. It is subscription to advertisers only with very annoying contractual restrictions.
 

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News Corp.’s Fox News Channel led the cable news networks in average viewership during 2008, according to Nielsen Media Research released Tuesday.

Fox News captured a daily average of 1.06 million viewers, compared to CNN, which averaged 695,000 viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by the network. MSNBC averaged 468,000 viewers.

Nielsen ended its year on Dec. 28, which is the last full week of 2008.

This is the seventh consecutive year Fox News has topped bitter rival CNN, owned by Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting System, the network said.

For the key prime-time slot — 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. — Fox News averaged 2.05 million viewers in 2008, compared to CNN, which averaged 1.29 million viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by CNN and Fox News.

Fox News also had a larger number of viewers in the 25-54 age group for prime time, averaging 494,000 viewers, according to Nielsen data supplied by the networks. CNN averaged 455,000 viewers, and MSNBC averaged 364,000 viewers.

CNN topped Fox News in the prime-time category for viewers age 25-54 for the first quarter of 2008, briefly taking bragging rights in the category away from Fox News for the first time since 2001.

Fox News stays ahead of CNN in viewership | ajc.com
Do the math, more people are watching CNN and MSNBC than are watching The Official Government And Party News Channel: the majority of viewers, and the majority of the nation, are tired of right wing crap and are getting their information somewhere else that bends left instead of right.

The demographic results are also not good news for Faux, while they are maintaining their large audience of Pissed Off White People, they are not attracting younger viewers in the numbers they need to maintain their lead. Also, they are about to lose their exclusive access to top admin officials, which will naturally lead to less viewship.
 

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Nielsen knows what they are doing. They are doing the survey they were PAID to do. But that has nothing to do with proper analysis of the raw data.

While Nielsen does their breakdown of the paid job correctly, they don't include ALL media because that was not in their contract and not in their trending. [It would be as if Nielsen was contracted to survey buying decisions for midsized American sedans [Chevy, Pontiac, Ford, Dodge]. A valid survey but not relevant to actual market decision making and strategic analysis]

If you want to understand what ALL media is doing you utilize aggregate surveys from neilsen, arbitron, adage and mediaweek. There is also a settop box stream that captures everything drawn from the top seven providers that gives 68% coverage and provides the most comprehensive analysis. It, however is not available to news media for publication. It is subscription to advertisers only with very annoying contractual restrictions.

I don't agree with your reasoning. ABC, NBC, CBS are not 24 hr news channels, it's an apple/orange comparision to lump them into the 24 hr news channels.
 
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