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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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So I've been thinking about this. The reason why rubber bushings weren't installed in the first place probably has to do with the nature of the hydraulic strut. If the strut were to leak, mineral oil will quickly deteriorate the rubber and you would have a tremendous problem on your hands. Replacing the steel heim joint with rubber could cause catastrophic failure and would be very dangerous. Furthermore, the tight tolerances in the hydraulic strut may not hold up to the forces transmitted from a flexible rubber joint.

From an engineering standpoint, this "fix" may get you by, but is of a lesser standard than originally designed.
 

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this "fix" may get you by, but is of a lesser standard than originally designed"
Valid conjecture. BUT,did anyone ever say that retrofitting the BMW bushing into the MB shock was meant to meet factory standards?

Let's face it. New SLS shock is $500. If the old one is NOT leaking and only bushing is gone, then, you have two options:
1. Replace the SLS shock altogether
2. Replace the bushing only

Option 1 is $500, option 2 is $30. When/if the SLS shock begins to leak, then, there are no other options but #1.

Good luck,
Steve

PS Oil doesn't "dissolve" rubber instantaneously, so the perceived danger from oil leak is slightly exaggerated, one could argue. There will be telltale signs that the rear suspension needs attention...
 

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1985 500 SEC EURO AMG/LORINSER; 1988 560SEL, 1995 S500 Sonderschutz
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Valid conjecture. BUT,did anyone ever say that retrofitting the BMW bushing into the MB shock was meant to meet factory standards?

Let's face it. New SLS shock is $500. If the old one is NOT leaking and only bushing is gone, then, you have two options:
1. Replace the SLS shock altogether
2. Replace the bushing only

Option 1 is $500, option 2 is $30. When/if the SLS shock begins to leak, then, there are no other options but #1.

Good luck,
Steve

PS Oil doesn't "dissolve" rubber instantaneously, so the perceived danger from oil leak is slightly exaggerated, one could argue. There will be telltale signs that the rear suspension needs attention...
Mostly I considered this other point of view to step inside why they chose the heim joint in the first place.

I'll need to really get under there and check things out. My car has 4 wheel ADS so I'm looking at the same cost for the front two shocks as well so ~$2200 for shocks... This is a tempting mod especially to just get you buy, I can always end up going with new shocks if this doesn't work out. I have quite a few other things to address so I hope you can understand my limbo and predicament.
 

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95 S500, 07 S550 AMG
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I have done mine by using a smaller bushing and cutting the edges, adding a washer to mkae the difference and then using the strut housing to close one end.

What you did seems to be very good but it appears it might slip out. I am not sure how you can close the end. I don't think a big enough washer on the end would hold...

From my experience, you need to find a median- between using a large enough bushing but thin enough you can close the strut end.

Perhaps showing some pics of my fix might help understand what I'm trying to say. It has been holding fine so far but I don't drive this car much anymore.
 

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I'll need to really get under there and check things out. My car has 4 wheel ADS so I'm looking at the same cost for the front two shocks as well so ~$2200 for shocks...
A small correction, if I may -- your wording is slightly misleading within the context of this thread.
The important detail is that the front shocks for the ADS cars are NOT hydraulic, although they are quite expensive too.

I am sure you know that, it is just for archiving purposes.

The fix we are discussing here is applicable ONLY to the rear hydraulic shocks. I do not recall seeing any posts dealing with bushing replacement for the fronts ADS shocks. They are either not known to cause problems are the rear ones or if the bushing is gone, standard bushing replacement procedure applies (I have to check WIS for that, I am almost sure MB calls for replacing the whole unit)

Good luck,
Steve

PS Removing the rear shocks from the car is not big of a deal. Doing the fix from post #1 will take perhaps 1/2 day for the first one and 2-3 hours for the second. The parts are inexpensive and IMHO, worth the try. Even if you get 5-10,000 miles afterwards, you will not regret it...
 

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'95 S600
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Discussion Starter #27
Steve well summed up nicely as to the why. Plenty of people\mechanics\technicians etc have done the same thing, documented or not, i just got lucky and found a bush that worked well and let others know.

As for the bushing slipping out - i don't see how is that possible when its a tight fit between the 2 metal tabs on the spring perch with a bolt going through it. Being rubber and having to cut it down means you can get as tight of a fit as you want when pressing it into the shock. All other dimension were near identical so no need for cutting, washers etc which was my goal. I've done about 1000km since i installed them.
 

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99 SL500, 88 560SL, 97 S500, 87 BMW 635 CSi
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I would love an update on the long term success of the bushing only replacement!
 

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'95 S600
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Discussion Starter #30
Car i did them on would have been lucky to have done 1000km since i did them, but no issues. Others like Joe-V12 should have a better idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
I agree, i would of done if i had known that as mine weren't clunking yet (opposite of most it seems)
 
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