Mercedes-Benz Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
1981 u1300L, 1998 s280
Joined
·
2,113 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sometime's neighbours never cease to amaze me.

My next door neighbour just blocked my drive way with a ford Ka. The only thing on the drive was a the mog :big laugh:

Took a few requests and a couple of hours but they've moved it. Shame, would have been a nice youtube video
 

·
Unimog Moderator
250GD Wolf
Joined
·
13,266 Posts
Its just a trencher, the mog isn't even armored by the looks of it, that trencher would become very dangerous shrapnel in the event it did strike a mine. Not to mention just the shock-wave from an anti-tank mine :eek:

I watched a video where they were doing armored testing of Hummers, they had one chained down and blew up a moderate sized mine underneath. It it had not been chained to the floor, it would have left the test site :cool:
 

·
Registered
1987 416 Doka
Joined
·
658 Posts
I can attest to the mines/IEDs and HMMWV's! It doesn't matter if there's armor or not in most cases. Bad guys are taking 6 or 8 105 shells and daisy chaining them to a remote detonator. When that kind of IED goes off, more than the vehicle suffers. Just as bad though, you can make shape charges and mount them off the ground so that the jet and projectile hit a "specific" target inside the vehicle. These too, are often built in packs and setup behind high cement walls so there is no visual warning. They are very accurate and easy to construct. I've seen trucks hit with them where the driver, vehicle commander, gunner, and general passenger compartment were all effectively targeted. It's quite the reality check for our vulnerabilities... I used 40# shape charges on tanks and punched 3-4" holes clean through them! When such charges detonate, the metal on the inside of the vehicle degrades and showers anyone inside with thousands of angry, sharp fragments; which combined with the concussion, usually is not survivable. But it all depends.

Most landmine ops are done with dozers and sacrificial attachments that blow off if a mine actually detonates. For IED's, we use special, one-man vehicles that have a long arm and a fork at the end, all of which is highly maneuverable. The arm has cameras so the controller can interigate any possible threat from a safe distance - it's pretty cool, but take a very long time, and that's time that troops are sitting on the "X".
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top