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ML-320
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235 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone lately gas is killing me and I was wondering what can i do to get my MPG up. I've looked on ebay and seen cheap garbage that I wouldnt but near my ML. I'm thinking intake or exhaust.

And dont respond with DRIVE SLOWER
 

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E320/E250 Bluetec Ford F350 6.7l
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36,470 Posts
DRIVE SLOWER or get diesel :D
Those engines are pretty well tuned from the factory. You might get a chip that will give you few more HP, but don't think you can do much for fuel savings.
 

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2013 C250
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7,273 Posts
Drive less/fewer miles. Your vehicle will never get good gas mileage.
 

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99 ML430 - 13 328i
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1,112 Posts
Drive less/fewer miles. Your vehicle will never get good gas mileage.
agreed. lately the only reason to drive is either to take my brother to school or back home, or go out for like one night a week.

also, try to clean your MAF sensor with CRC MAF Sensor Cleaner. If the sensor is in bad shape and you clean it up it will do wonders. Good luck.

~Jake
 

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2001 ML430
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465 Posts
Yup. I agree with the above. That is why I only drive mine about 1 day a week. The rest of the time I am on my motorcycle. I can ride like a madman and get 45mpg.
 

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2000 ML-430 Polar White
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319 Posts
inflate your tires. I run mine at 40. exhaust helps some, maybe 1 mpg mixed and like 2 or 3 highway depending on the road. Otherwaise we have to keep our feet of the floor. I consistently get 20 mpg mixed. I have seen 23 mpg on a 250 mile trip several weeks ago.
 

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2002 ML55 AMG, 2005 Chrysler Crossfire Coupe Limited, 1999 C280
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4,714 Posts
Hey everyone lately gas is killing me and I was wondering what can i do to get my MPG up. I've looked on ebay and seen cheap garbage that I wouldnt but near my ML. I'm thinking intake or exhaust.

And dont respond with DRIVE SLOWER
Count yourself lucky my friend!

I average 8-9 miles per gallon in the city and 11-12 miles per gallon on the highway.

But then it does have a big V8 and an intoxicating growl to ease my pain and suffering:D
 

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2001 ML430, 1983 300SD, 2008 GL450
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904 Posts
Ditto on tire pressure. There can be a 5-10% loss due to improper inflation.

On the highway the throttle is what kills mileage. Remember air drag has a squared relationship to speed, not linear. Up to around 55mph air resistance is not material. Between 55-65 mph it becomes a material problem. Above 65mph air drag is substantial.

In city driving the problem is not the throttle but the brake. Every time you use them you have just thrown away all of the fuel you burned accelerating the vehicle. Leave space in front of you and coast to stops as much as possible. Your driving style can have a 25% difference in economy.

From my logs driving 80mph with improperly inflated tires give me about 16 mpg. Driving 60-65mph with properly inflated tires give me 20 mpg.

City driving taking it easy gives me 16 mpg. Using my normal driving style and going on very short trips give me 12 mpg.
 

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2008 Super Charged Range Rover, 2007 GL450, 2007 S65 Renntech'd
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197 Posts
I've got some excellent suggestions.

When you pull up to a stop light, turn your car off.

When you are on the freeway, put the car in neutral and coast, until you reach the minimum 45 mph.

Always coast downhill.

Never go uphill.

Don't race every car, like I do.

Don't drive against the wind. Always drive with the wind pushing you.

Don't carry any passengers.

Make your kids walk, to lighten the load.

Put an extra coat of wax on the hood of the car to help the wind go over the car faster.

Take the car to west coast customs and have them modify it to a 2 cylinder vehicle.

Any of these suggestions will save you a substantial amount on gas.
 

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ML-320
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235 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I've got some excellent suggestions.

When you pull up to a stop light, turn your car off.

When you are on the freeway, put the car in neutral and coast, until you reach the minimum 45 mph.

Always coast downhill.

Never go uphill.

Don't race every car, like I do.

Don't drive against the wind. Always drive with the wind pushing you.

Don't carry any passengers.

Make your kids walk, to lighten the load.

Put an extra coat of wax on the hood of the car to help the wind go over the car faster.

Take the car to west coast customs and have them modify it to a 2 cylinder vehicle.

Any of these suggestions will save you a substantial amount on gas.


And the award for THE BIGGEST DOOSH BAG on Benzworld goes to that guy
 

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1999 ML320
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24,029 Posts
Hey everyone lately gas is killing me and I was wondering what can i do to get my MPG up. I've looked on ebay and seen cheap garbage that I wouldnt but near my ML. I'm thinking intake or exhaust.

And dont respond with DRIVE SLOWER
This Guy Can Get 59 MPG in a Plain Old Accord. Beat That, Punk.

on a midsummer saturday in a sprawling wisconsin parking lot, about a dozen people are milling about a candy-apple red Honda Insight. They're watching Wayne Gerdes prepare for his run in Hybridfest's mpg Challenge, a 20-mile race through the streets of Madison. Wayne is the odds-on favorite to win the challenge, in which drivers compete to push the automotive limits not of speed and power—a desire those gathered here consider old-fashioned and wasteful—but for the unsexy title of Most Fuel-Efficient Driver in the World.

Wayne is believed to be that driver, but he's nervous, because all day long the hypermilers—the term Wayne invented to describe the band of brothers who push the limits of fuel efficiency—have been getting crazy-high miles-per-gallon readings, as much as 100 mpg. For the race, he's borrowed a buddy's Insight and, in order to decrease the car's mass, jettisoned everything that's not screwed down. Car detritus—a pillow, towels, cleaning supplies, a tool kit—sits neatly on a blanket on the macadam.

What can't be jettisoned is Wayne himself, who at 6 feet 1 inch and 210 pounds looks too big to fit into this tin can two-seater. ("I would love to lose 60 pounds," he tells me, "because it would help my mileage.") In Wayne's world, fuel efficiency is not about the car. It's about the driver. Wayne doesn't get high mpg marks by tinkering with engines or using funky fuels or even, most days, by driving a hybrid. He gets them by driving consciously—hyperconsciously. He takes out his wallet and his keys. Then he removes his sneakers. "We'll put them on eBay," cracks one of the onlookers. "He's speeding," someone says as Wayne exits the parking lot. "Look at him go." Wayne is doing no more than 15 miles per hour. Before he's out of sight, though, he turns a full loop on the exit road to slow himself down, so he doesn't have to brake at a traffic jam ahead. Wayne hates braking.

Forty-five minutes later, Wayne is still driving the bucolic 20-mile course when raindrops as big as marbles begin falling and winds send trash hurtling across the parking lot. Everyone runs for cover, and I jump into a Toyota Prius owned by one of Wayne's hypermiling buddies, Dave Bassage. Puddles and high winds are a hypermiler's nightmare. "Nature's putting on its own energy show," says Bassage, watching the blasts of lightning through his water-splattered windshield. "This pretty much screws Wayne."

two nights earlier, on a clammy 80-degree Chicago evening, I wait for Wayne at the curb at O'Hare International Airport. I first see his technique as the car he's driving, a 2006 Honda Civic Hybrid, pulls over to pick me up. Drifts over, actually, like a jellyfish. Around Wayne is madness in motion: Drivers in four lanes are accelerating hard, weaving erratically, or grinding to a halt. To Wayne, these are the driving habits of the ignorant and the wasteful—which is to say, nearly all of us. Wayne's car glides to a stop as if it has run out of gas. Wayne has stopped without braking.

The car is owned by his friend Terry Honaker, who, with his wife, Cathy, is along for the ride. Inside it's hotter and even more humid than outside. As we take off—or, more accurately, as the vehicle rolls forward really slowly—I notice that all four windows are closed and the AC is off. I'm sitting in one of the most technologically advanced cars in the world, and it feels like I'm trapped in a fanless tollbooth in Biloxi, Mississippi, in August. We take the interstate to Wayne's house. The speed limit is 55, and most of the traffic is zipping past at 75 or so, but Wayne hovers around 50 mph. He's riding the white line on the right side of the right-hand lane.

"Why are you doing that?" I ask from the backseat. "It's called ridge-riding," he explains, using another term he's invented. He ridge-rides to let people behind him know that he is moving slowly. I imagine it's also a way to avoid dying plastered to the grill of a semi. Ridge-riding, Wayne explains, saves gas in the rain, as it gets the wheels out of the puddly grooves in the road created by more, let's say, traditional drivers. "People are burning fuel to throw water in the air," he says, adding that you can hear if you're driving in the road's grooves or out of them. That's interesting, but I'm having a hard time concentrating, because my back and butt are beginning to stick to the seat. "Is anybody a little warm in here?" I ask.

I don't think Wayne hears me, because, as a Chevy Tahoe whizzes by, he notes, "I imagine that it's getting 10 to 13 miles per gallon climbing this hill. We're getting about 80. It'll drive you crazy." I'm thinking that hypermiling consists of driving like a 90-year-old in a mobile sweat lodge, but I'm about to find out I'm wrong. Really, really wrong.

"Buckle up tight, because this is the death turn," says Wayne. Death turn? We're moving at 50 mph. Wayne turns off the engine. He's bearing down on the exit, and as he turns the wheel sharply to the right, the tires squeal—which is what happens when you take a 25 mph turn going 50. Cathy, Terry's wife, who is sitting next to me in the backseat, grabs my leg. I grab the door handle. As we come out of the 270-degree turn, Cathy says, "I hope you have upholstery cleaner."

We glide for over a mile with the engine off, past a gas station, right at a green light, through another green light—Wayne is always timing his speed to land green lights—and around a mall, using momentum in a way that would have made Isaac Newton proud. "Are we going to attempt that at home?" Cathy asks Terry, a talkative man who has been stone silent since Wayne executed the death turn in his car. "Not in this lifetime," he shoots back.

Wayne is paying attention to the road, not the banter. He's had to turn the engine back on earlier than he usually does after taking the death turn. "I hit the turn at 50, 51," he says. "I should have hit it at 52."
 

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2005 ML500
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40 Posts
You should probably buy another vehicle because you will NEVER EVER get 25MPG in the city. You could get 70+ MPG free-wheeling downhill, but you will have to climb that hill going the other way. :D
 

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Premium Member
2013 C250
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7,273 Posts
walk more, a lot more.
 

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99 ML430 - 13 328i
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1,112 Posts
Take out all the passenger seats, door panels, dash board and carpet to lighten the load.
replace everything possible that can be changed with carbon fiber parts, remove all ac components, use lightweight wheels, replace drivers seat with a lightweight racing seat, remove center console, have no spare change anywhere in the car.
 

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Premium Member
2006 E55: 1999 ML430; 2002 E430 4matic; 1988 190E 2.3; 1993 XL883
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301 Posts
Install a clean air filter and clean the MAF. Make sure your plugs are clean. Have the injectors cleaned. Maintain proper tire pressure.

16 MPG is pretty good for a high performance Mercedes SUV
 
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