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1990 Arctic White 560 SEC and 1990 Smoke Silver Metallic 560 SEC (formerly Cascade's)
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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone here used a 'mityvac' before.
If you don't know what it is, it's just a vacuum that can suck fluids (engine oil, transmission fluid, coolant, etc) without having to get under your car and drain it. I have heard good things about it, and I want to know what you all think of it.
 

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1990 300SE
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1,466 Posts
I use what I assume is the same sort of thing. Just an electric pump for getting fluids out. I bought it at a marine supply place (ever try to change the oil in a boat from underneath?). Works great.
 

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1988 560SEL sold:
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4,717 Posts
I have Topsider MVP - it is a manual vacuum pump that can hold 8 quarts comfortably (amount of oil in my engine) and it comes in very handy for oil changes not just for the car but also for outdoor power equipment. MityVac or TOpsider, the fact that one does not have to get under the car for an oil change is a real plus (and the fact I don't have to tip over the lawnmower or a snowblower to drain oil is a definite plus).

It was about $35 and you can get it online or at marine supply stores.
 

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1991 300 SE
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I think I’ll get a topsider. This new-fangled 300 SE has got the big plastic cover under the engine, what a PITA – it takes me longer to remove and replace the cover than do the entire oil change. [:(]
 

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2000 ML320 / 1988 300SE / 1985 380SE / 1969 280SE
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Mityvac 7201 or Motive Power Bleeder 0109?

I am not 100% convinced yet after reading several posts about pros and cons of this Mityvac and Power Bleeder.

Can Mityvac suck all of the oil in the engine and can I use it for brake bleeding?
Some argue that it does not work 100% and some say that we need Motive Power Bleeder for brake bleeding.

Only a way to get them here in Australia is through ebay with rediculus postage of U$60.00.

Are there any other products which can do both jobs.
Thanks for your inputs.:bowdown::bowdown:

Anyone here used a 'mityvac' before.
If you don't know what it is, it's just a vacuum that can suck fluids (engine oil, transmission fluid, coolant, etc) without having to get under your car and drain it. I have heard good things about it, and I want to know what you all think of it.
 

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2013 MINI Copper S Clubman, '84 300CD-weekend car
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A Mity vac can be used as a fluid "sucker", but it would take a VERY long time, I don't recommend it for that, but as a diagnostic tool, can't be beat. Cost being an issue, just drain fluids from below.
 

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190E, SLK350
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Absolutely, get Motive to do the brake power bleeding, there is no way I would repeat that fiasco I went through trying to bleed my brakes by pumping the pedal. I got the Motive with different caps each for my cars.
As far as oil change, I can see a big plus in terms of avoiding damages to the drain hole thread but draining oil from below I think is much better than pumping it out from above.
 

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Absolutely, get Motive to do the brake power bleeding, there is no way I would repeat that fiasco I went through trying to bleed my brakes by pumping the pedal. I got the Motive with different caps each for my cars.
As far as oil change, I can see a big plus in terms of avoiding damages to the drain hole thread but draining oil from below I think is much better than pumping it out from above.
I've had a Mity-Vac for about, wow, 20 years, now, and it's amazing how it comes in handy. Mine cost about $25 way back when, but it was well worth it the first time I needed to bleed brakes.

I'm also a fan of draining oil from below, as that's the logical thing to do, getting any potential crud to run out with the almost-hot oil, but when I did my timing chain, which necessitated the first oil change I did on the 420, I found draining the pan left a solid 6-8 ounces of old oil in the pan based on the shape. I removed the pan after draining, looking for the missing old timing chain guides...never found any.

It appears sucking oil out would actually remove more of the used stuff, which kinda hacks me off, as if I did this with the Mity-Vac, it'd take a few hours....

If nothing else, when you need to prime the suction of something from a reservoir, you don't run the risk of tasting, or worse, injesting, whatever it is. I can tell you from personal experience, gasoline (leaded & unleaded), brake fluid (both DOT 3 & 4), diff oil (dino & synthetic), all taste really, really bad.

Wow, leaded gasoline...I'm gettin' old....

Even the fumes of this stuff can taste really nasty. I know, I know, you shouldn't do this...I'm not dead, yet.
 

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190E, SLK350
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^^
I had my suspicions about you, you seemed to have a few fried neurones ;)
 

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1993 300TE, 1995 E320 Wagon
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I think there's maybe some confusion about which type of Mityvac you'd use for an oil change. I've got one of the Mityvac 7201 units (see pic)-- it's great for a mess-free change (takes about 15 minutes to drain MOST of the oil). I did an experiment last time, and pulled the drain plug after the Mityvac had done its thing. I found that there was still about 1/2 to 3/4 liter in the pan, even though the Mityvac wasn't able to pull anything more out. I don't know if it's because I didn't get the hose all the way down (I couldn't force it any farther though) or what. In any case, it is a heck of a lot easier, and cleaner, than draining the whole lot from below (doesn't everyone get a handful of warm/hot oil on them just as the drain plug comes out, or do I have lousy technique?). This one could be used for a power bleed too, as it has a two-way valve. I'd use my smaller Mityvac (6820, second pic) for this purpose, though.
 

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I've found you must be both quick, and know when you're on the last thread when removing the plug.

Over the years, in spite of my petroluem-induced brain damage, :D, I have thought about how to lessen the mess and unpleasantness of being partially-bathed in hot oil.

When you're unscrewing the drain plug, push in on it gently, yet firmly, and when you have it undone to the final thread, you'll feel it ever-so-slightly go back in just a little bit because you're pushing on it.

The best way to get a feel for this is to grab a nut & bolt, thread the nut on three or four threads, then unscrew the bolt, pushing on the nut, and when you get to the end of the threads, you'll be able to both see & feel the 'jump' when the very beginning of the threads slip past each other.

This is helpful 'cause you know the bolt is loose enough to just quickly and smoothly either drop it, or like I try to do, pull it up out of the way. You'll still get a few drips on you, but nothing like a forearm rinse...hopefully.

Alternatively, and I've yet to look into this for the 126 or my wife's Lexus, but I have had one on our diesel pusher motorhome...'cause 4 gallons of used diesel oil is just something you don't want to touch...for a good while now. It's an oil drain plug which has a lever on it so you don't need to remove anything. Just turn a lever, which is spring-locked so it can't just move (more about this later), and your oil is draining.

I thought the slighlty-smaller-than-the-drain-hole diameter might hold back a goodly amount of the used stuff, but it seems no matter how you do it, suction or drain, there's gonna be some left. I'm not about to drop the pan every time to get the leavings....

I like it 'cause you can drain the oil when it's truly hot, yet not get burned. The one I have is made by Fumoto. The only risk I see is having some loser drain your oil when you're not looking, but they'd have to know it's there, or, if they see it, know what it is.

This said, I had one on an '85.5 Nissan 720 (softbody) pickup. This is back in '89, or so. Worked great, until one day, in the way remote regions of Idaho, while on a long, roaming trip from Dallas to Calgary and back, it opened. Turns out, the rocky, borderline off-road trail I was on, and this was a 2WD truck (lowered slightly, of course, 1.5 inches, maybe...this was 1989, after all), a rock managed to hit the lever just right, it turned, draining about 2.8 of the 4 quarts it held onto the dirt track I was driving. I hopped out as soon as I saw the oil pressure light flicker on, and immediately closed it, burned hands be damned. I was a solid 30 miles from civilization, and didn't want to hike out.

I had literally just crossed over a mountian pass, and it was downhill for a few miles, so I coasted. Nice to not have power brakes or steering!

I happened to roll to a stop, quite literally, in front of an obviously abandoned ranch. No intact windows in the buildings, doors open and swinging in the wind...it'd been empty a good while.

I poked around, after yelling for a while to make certain I wasn't going to piss anyone off, and in an old barn-like structure, I found the only thing of any value, to me, or anyone. One sole bottle of generic 10W-40 oil. Dusty, but unopened. I literally could not believe it, and looked around to see if it was a trick of some sort.

I hadn't seen anyone in a solid 12 hours, so it was also a bit of paranoia creeping in. It was truly rural, and darkness wasn't more than a couple of hours off. I did not want to be stuck here.

That one bottle of oil raised the level high enough so the oil pickup was immersed, so I drove, slowly, to Arco, ID, ironically named, where I was more than happy to buy two more quarts, topping the system off.

Never had another problem, and when I installed it, I intentionally oriented the lever in such a way so that I thought this could not happen. If there are enough randomly-flying rock, though...

That vehicle's oil drain was on the side of the pan, however, not the back, like on the 126. Still, there is a risk....

 

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2001 M-B E320 (W210)
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Anyone here used a 'mityvac' before.
If you don't know what it is, it's just a vacuum that can suck fluids (engine oil, transmission fluid, coolant, etc) without having to get under your car and drain it. I have heard good things about it, and I want to know what you all think of it.
Different brand but same principle; I bought one from Harbor-Freight that requires no hand-pumping, as it uses air from an air compressor. Here is a link using it for the first time doing an oil change on my 2001 E320.

Oil Change Using an Oil Extractor
 

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I use the oil extractor from Harbor Freight, it's the best $130 that I have spent for my garage. I also have the manual version "Topsider" for my boat. both work very well. If you have the air supply to run the extractor go and get it. I connect it to the dip stick tube on my S430 and while it is sucking the oil out I change the filter element. It takes me longer to pour the new oil back into the car than it did to suck the old oil out and change the filter. I use the Mity-Vac for bleeding brakes and checking vacuum supply lines and vacuum operated devices.
Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

Mike
 
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